EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Does rubbing on wax wihout hot iron and scrape work?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Does rubbing on wax wihout hot iron and scrape work? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post


With an iron you need more wax, so you'd have to scrape too.
I'm kinda curious about the hair dryer technique though. Would you use it before you apply the wax or after?


How i do it. (crgildart: we do have a waxing table with a vise and outlets at our upper race shack)  When applying overlays, major heat is required to iron in hf and other overlays.  I heat up/ dry off the ski with a hair dryer, brass brush it, and rub on my overlay.  Now the ski base is warm and will absorb the wax better.  Because you are using convection instead of conduction, the chance of burning the base from not having enough wax down is not a problem.  Ok, back to the process.  Turn the hair dryer on high and hold the hair dryer about 1-2 inches away from the ski.(you will find that the hair dryer actually acts like a hovercraft and does not touch the ski base.)  Make slow lateral passes until you see the wax start to melt for a split second under the dryer.  You can now begin your trip down the ski.  After I reach the tail, i do a few passes over the length of the ski, and then cork like h@**.(if in shop i scrape with a 3 mm gently before corking)  Now for a cold overlay i use brass, nylon, felt, horsehair, and blue nylon.  If it is warm, skip brass.

post #32 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post



How i do it. (crgildart: we do have a waxing table with a vise and outlets at our upper race shack)  When applying overlays, major heat is required to iron in hf and other overlays.  I heat up/ dry off the ski with a hair dryer, brass brush it, and rub on my overlay.  Now the ski base is warm and will absorb the wax better.  Because you are using convection instead of conduction, the chance of burning the base from not having enough wax down is not a problem.  Ok, back to the process.  Turn the hair dryer on high and hold the hair dryer about 1-2 inches away from the ski.(you will find that the hair dryer actually acts like a hovercraft and does not touch the ski base.)  Make slow lateral passes until you see the wax start to melt for a split second under the dryer.  You can now begin your trip down the ski.  After I reach the tail, i do a few passes over the length of the ski, and then cork like h@**.(if in shop i scrape with a 3 mm gently before corking)  Now for a cold overlay i use brass, nylon, felt, horsehair, and blue nylon.  If it is warm, skip brass.


Why not just use a heat gun instead of a cheesy hair dryer?  It would be twice as fast and you have more accurate temp settings.

ski iron>regular iron

heat gun>hair dryer

^^^^right?

 

post #33 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


Why not just use a heat gun instead of a cheesy hair dryer?  It would be twice as fast and you have more accurate temp settings.

ski iron>regular iron

heat gun>hair dryer

^^^^right?

 



yeah........but our heat gun only has a low and a high and the high will easily melt p-tex and i think that even the low will smoke wax.  When applying race wax, it's all about low and slow.

post #34 of 41

 

Quote:

Milwaukee 8988-20 Variable Temperature Heat Gun

 

Technical Details

  • Ceramic encapsulated heating element for maximum tool life
  • LED Digital Readout Display shows present temperature in increments of 10º F
  • One hand operation with lightweight and easy grip handle
  • Upright stationary use with pads on back cap and lower handle
  • Limited warranty

 

Product Description

This variable temperature heat gun offers a range from 90 to 1050deg Fahrenheit. The LED digital readout display allows you to monitor the temperature via a digital display when precision control is needed. Three controlled air volumes, 7.06/8.83/15.89 cu.ft.min., allow you to match the air speed to your application. The first stage air volume does not include heat for cooling applications. Volts: 120 AC, Amps: 12.5, Required CFM: 7.06, 8.83, 15.89, Heat Settings: Variable, Temperature Capacity (deg F): 90 - 1,050, Case Included: No

 

 

You'd only need up to about 250 F (outside on a very cold day) for wax, but this is a much better and more reliable piece of equipment than a $15 hair dryer.  Higher temps might be handy for base welds.  I've only used fire and soldering irons for that, but the notion of well placed heat might be worth a look.  Regardless, if I was spending hundreds on files and stones, digital edge bevel measurement indicators, etc.  Why not go with this instead of a cheesy plastic hair dryer?

 

 

post #35 of 41

I have a nice electronic heat gun and fan tip which works well for melting pastes, rub ons and liquids. I use it mainly for patterned based skis to get better durability out of the wax on the scales/patterned areas. After messing around with it on flat base sections which works fine, I find roto corking easier and as effective as using hot air. (The combination of both is ideal.) It's pretty impressive how much heat you can generate and the roto-corking 'presses' the wax into the base and spreads it better.

 

Either hot air or roto corking (or ironing and  base repairs, for that matter) are more effective the warmer the skis are as a whole, ie inside at room temperature vs outside in the cold. The hot air or friction heat source needs to be hotter, the colder the ambient air.


Edited by Alpinord - 2/2/12 at 7:43am
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

You'd only need up to about 250 F (outside on a very cold day) for wax, but this is a much better and more reliable piece of equipment than a $15 hair dryer.  Higher temps might be handy for base welds.  I've only used fire and soldering irons for that, but the notion of well placed heat might be worth a look.  Regardless, if I was spending hundreds on files and stones, digital edge bevel measurement indicators, etc.  Why not go with this instead of a cheesy plastic hair dryer?

 

 


well im not spending that much on edge bevelers etc., but you have a very good product there.

 

post #37 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

I have a nice electronic heat gun and fan tip which works well for melting pastes, rub ons and liquids. I use it mainly for patterned based skis to get better durability out of the wax on the scales/patterned areas. After messing around with it on flat base sections which works fine, I find roto corking easier and as effective as using hot air. (The combination of both is ideal.) It's pretty impressive how much heat you can generate and the roto-corking 'presses' the wax into the base and spreads it better.

 

Either hot air or roto corking (or ironing and  base repairs, for that matter) are more effective the warmer the skis are as a whole, ie inside at room temperature vs outside in the cold. The hot air or friction heat source needs to be hotter, the colder the ambient air.



yep, but after heating up the base, you don't need to roto cork as well.  a regular cork works just fine.

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post



yep, but after heating up the base, you don't need to roto cork as well.  a regular cork works just fine.


True.....especially if you don't have a roto-cork. The main point above was that a roto-cork can replace the heat gun or hair dryer and just might be faster and more convenient.

 

 

post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

 

You'd only need up to about 250 F (outside on a very cold day) for wax, but this is a much better and more reliable piece of equipment than a $15 hair dryer.  Higher temps might be handy for base welds.  I've only used fire and soldering irons for that, but the notion of well placed heat might be worth a look.  Regardless, if I was spending hundreds on files and stones, digital edge bevel measurement indicators, etc.  Why not go with this instead of a cheesy plastic hair dryer?

 

 


Some of the electronic heat guns are pretty versatile and capable. You can plastic weld, sweat pipes and solder with them. I've been plastic welding base repairs with mine as well. I haven't pushed it because I can see where the base can get toasted quickly if someone isn't paying attention. The wire feed attachment issues aren't worked out with mine yet, but I think it could be the ticket with hot air welding with heat guns.

 

 

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post


well im not spending that much on edge bevelers etc., but you have a very good product there.

 



I don't have one but used some nice ones back when I used to work in a formica furniture studio so I'm familiar with their potential.

 

I'm more of a do the best with what you can afford kind of guy.  Save the extra money for lift tickets and gas.  But, it you're going to be a nit picker or require near perfection it is prudent to go with the best tools and techniques available. If a hair dryer is what you got and it's working well then party on!yahoo.gif   When away from an actual tuning bench, I'd NEVER go to the trouble of trying to use a hair dryer when a cork (or motel irondevil.gif) is within reach.  But, I'm only skiing for fun and an occasional NASTAR medal these daysbiggrin.gif

post #41 of 41

One point of caution: all companies warn that fluorinated compounds should not come to contact with electric heaters because toxic gases will be generated. I am not certain how close to the heating element of the heat gun the waxes get, but fluorocarbons have a tendency to sublime (change from solid to gas without going through a liquid state).  So it should somehow be ensured that wax vapor does not come in contact with the heating element if the heat gun is used with any sort of fluoro.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Tuning, Maintenance and Repairs › Does rubbing on wax wihout hot iron and scrape work?