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How much do new skis help?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

 

 

  So first ski day of the year I was very rusty and had a hard time skiing the crud and powder so I thought new skis would be a good fix. I have skied a lot since then and I am now better at crud and powder but I still feel like my skiing has weak spots. I feel like there are plenty of jumps or drops I want to hit that are often times natural features but the run-out is cruddy and steep and I am afraid I will lose it skiing away at those speeds on my skis, I am getting better at skiing in crud when I try to stay centered and have my skis doing less sideways motion and more pointing in the direction they are sliding by keeping more edge angle. I feel like my biggest problem is after a lot of snow when it gets really deep, I have a hard time staying balanced especially on flatter terrain, my tips dive and catch and it's hard for me to stay balanced and not fall on my face. when the same snow gets skied out I also have problems with forward and backward balance. I can tell I am getting better and I was going to get new skis but now I am wondering if I should. I don't want to be the bad skier who skis on really nice skis. I would rather be better on cheaper skis.

 

I will eventually get new skis but I don't know if I should wait. I know the latest I would get new skis would be like in March.

 

 

I have a lot of room for improvement in my skiing and I don't know if it is in part my skis being too short or not wide enough. I am 15 135 lbs and 5'7 about. These skis are Rossi S7.pro 160cm long and 90mm underfoot with reg camber. The skis I am looking at are Atomic Blogs 177cm 110mm underfoot rockered. I ski at Alta too.

 

Should I just wait till I get better and then get new skis?

 

I am not going to get new skis until I can do smoothe 360's as well. I don't know how long that may take.

 

Thanks

post #2 of 11

First, try not to give a damn what anyone else thinks about your skis in relation to your ability.  Ski on whatever you want because you want to and if some Alta Bro Brah has a problem they're probably not as good as they think they are (because anyone who is wouldn't give a crap).

 

Second, longer skis will give you more stability and possibly more confidence as a result.  But I can't comment on the Blogs.

post #3 of 11

If you don't have boots that fit your feet the way they should, new skis will be a waste of money.  Been there and done that too many times.

post #4 of 11

Can different skis make a difference?  Yes.  Will they definitely help what you've described?  No, not necessarily.  In general, skills and technique are worth way more than new skis.

 

You've posted up a lot of threads wondering about how X or Y will help your skiing.  If you can, pony up $50 and demo skis for a day.  It will answer a *lot* of your questions.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Yeah I know longer fatter skis won't help me throw bigger tricks and completely change my skiing. But could it possibly give me at least noticabely more stability at speed through crud so that the hits that have choppy steep run-puts I could actually consider? At Alta, if you know Baldy Shoulder, keep traversing until you get to the orange Avalanche ropes with the gate, plenty of stuff I want to hit possibly in there later in the season and stuff I have already hit but some of the run-outs are highspeed and after 18 inches of snow tracked out or next day, that would be impossible on my skis (or any skis maybe) when there is more snow but it is pretty tight and sort of steep in there... But Maybe those Blogs it could help my balance in powder (well not help me balance but make it easier). I just want to know what part of it is my skill and what part is my skis. I honestly think I am coming a long way and my skiing is improving very fast. I understand edging and leaning down the slope and when I imply those things, my skiing improves. I believe I just need time on skis. I can only get better.

 

I will try to demo skis but $50 is that much more I need to save for skis. I'll do my best though.

 

Thanks

post #6 of 11


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by drainbamage View Post

Yeah I know longer fatter skis won't help me throw bigger tricks and completely change my skiing.leas But could it possibly give me at t noticabely more stability at speed through crud so that the hits that have choppy steep run-puts I could actually consider? At Alta, if you know Baldy Shoulder, keep traversing until you get to the orange Avalanche ropes with the gate, plenty of stuff I want to hit possibly in there later in the season and stuff I have already hit but some of the run-outs are highspeed and after 18 inches of snow tracked out or next day, that would be impossible on my skis (or any skis maybe) when there is more snow but it is pretty tight and sort of steep in there... But Maybe those Blogs it could help my balance in powder (well not help me balance but make it easier). I just want to know what part of it is my skill and what part is my skis. I honestly think I am coming a long way and my skiing is improving very fast. I understand edging and leaning down the slope and when I imply those things, my skiing improves. I believe I just need time on skis. I can only get better.

 

I will try to demo skis but $50 is that much more I need to save for skis. I'll do my best though.

 

Thanks


Yes.

 

post #7 of 11

Quote:
Originally Posted by drainbamage View Post

Yeah I know longer fatter skis won't help me throw bigger tricks and completely change my skiing. But could it possibly give me at least noticabely more stability at speed through crud so that the hits that have choppy steep run-puts I could actually consider?


Yes, it definitely could and probably would.  But will it be enough to make you feel comfortable in those conditions?  Maybe, maybe not.

 

You have 3 choices here:

1. Don't go buy new skis.

2. Go buy new skis.

3. Go demo skis to get a sense of what new skis would offer you (and then go back to either #1 or 2 depending on the results).

 

Take your pick.  When you're on a tight budget, $50 to demo may be tough to swing.  But it's far cheaper than new skis that still don't let you ski the way you want because the problems are more technique based.  I think you'd learn a lot doing it, especially if you do it on-mountain and have a chance to try more than one pair of skis on the same day (I probably wouldn't bother with more than 2 pairs, eats up too much time in the day going down and swapping skis IMO).  Even if you don't end up being able to demo the skis you want to buy, you'd still learn a lot about how different skis feel and react.

post #8 of 11
New skis help, not as much as a good fitting boot.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am going with fitted boots probably next year. But I will try to demo skis on a day with fresh snow and see how they perform compared to my old ones in the conditions where I want to be better.

 

And now off I go skiing.,

post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 

My skis are fine for the conditions we have been having for the past like 15 days I have been skiing but it was the first day this year when we were skiing powder and thick crud where I had problems going fast but I know I am a better skier now and it probably won't be such a bad problem. I'll demo those Blogs though.

post #11 of 11

Listen to everybody, boots before skis, I didnt know what a difference boots made untill I took these guys advice and got some fitted boots. A big burly powder ski is going to get away from you if you dont have the boots to keep them in line.

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