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So Colorado...

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 

how boney is it out there? 

 

18 " of base at Mid Vail usually means straddling small trees...

 

Viking

post #2 of 28

Verynonono2.gif

post #3 of 28

Went to Keystone on Sat. done a few NASTAR runs & played around in the easy park,......so sad.

post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 

Lotsa rocks?

 

post #5 of 28

Looks like the forecast calls for some chance of snow.  But who knows how much if it does hit.  Will visit Dillon area after the New Year...may consider rental skis, or alternative activities.

post #6 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by viking kaj View Post

Lotsa rocks?

 

No, man made snICE very few bare spots on the runs that are open,,but it's better than not skiing. 
 

 

post #7 of 28
Conditions here are "firm," but in many places, the coverage is excellent. Firm is an acquired taste, but at least as for me, I've absolutely enjoyed the challenge of it this early season. I had some free time this afternoon, and I skied fifteen runs off Copper Mountain's "Exelerator" lift on the top, working on my slalom turns.

We won't have much of the back country "off-piste" runs open--including the runs off Alpine and Resolution lifts, as well as Spaulding, Copper, and Jupiter Bowls--until we get a good bit more snow. But anyone who can't find great challenge on the front side runs either has not enough imagination, doesn't understand what a good turn is, or just doesn't care. As far as I'm concerned the skiing is--as all skiing is--great!

wink.gif

Best regards, and Merry Christmas!
Bob Barnes
post #8 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Conditions here are "firm," but in many places, the coverage is excellent. Firm is an acquired taste, but at least as for me, I've absolutely enjoyed the challenge of it this early season. I had some free time this afternoon, and I skied fifteen runs off Copper Mountain's "Exelerator" lift on the top, working on my slalom turns.
We won't have much of the back country "off-piste" runs open--including the runs off Alpine and Resolution lifts, as well as Spaulding, Copper, and Jupiter Bowls--until we get a good bit more snow. But anyone who can't find great challenge on the front side runs either has not enough imagination, doesn't understand what a good turn is, or just doesn't care. As far as I'm concerned the skiing is--as all skiing is--great!
wink.gif
Best regards, and Merry Christmas!
Bob Barnes

Agree ! 
 

 

post #9 of 28

Out visiting my daughter, SIL and baby Granddaughter in Northglenn for Christmas. Skied Eldora last Friday 12/23 and today 12/26.Not bad,especially considering how lousy things have been at home in Rochester NY.Eldora got about 15" last Thursday and the groomers were decent. No real bump runs and the trees were closed, but hey-it's skiing.If conditions were just a wee bit better I'd go to Loveland tomorrow, but with not a ton of terrain, I don't feel up to the holiday week crowd and the I-70 battle. Too bad-we got spoiled by our pre-XMas visit last year!

 

The kids are moving to SLC in January-nailing down the dates for a March visit shortly! In the meantime, back to Upstate NY on Wed. and the start of beer league/Master racing(if it gets cold enough to make snow) 

post #10 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Conditions here are "firm," but in many places, the coverage is excellent. Firm is an acquired taste, but at least as for me, I've absolutely enjoyed the challenge of it this early season. I had some free time this afternoon, and I skied fifteen runs off Copper Mountain's "Exelerator" lift on the top, working on my slalom turns.

We won't have much of the back country "off-piste" runs open--including the runs off Alpine and Resolution lifts, as well as Spaulding, Copper, and Jupiter Bowls--until we get a good bit more snow. But anyone who can't find great challenge on the front side runs either has not enough imagination, doesn't understand what a good turn is, or just doesn't care. As far as I'm concerned the skiing is--as all skiing is--great!

wink.gif

Best regards, and Merry Christmas!
Bob Barnes


 

Bob,

I like your positive attitude...the skiing isn't awful in comparison to many other areas but in comparison to last year it is not good.  I'll agree it is better than no skiing at all....

 

post #11 of 28
Depends on your perspective, I suppose, UGASkiDawg. As I said, I personally very much enjoy skiing on hard snow. Not only is it a special challenge, but when you get it right and make a decent turn, it's especially rewarding--with sensations I just cannot get in soft "easy" snow. Don't get me wrong--I love powder too, and I look forward to the day we get some. But I am not kidding when I say that I enjoy these firm conditions. I wouldn't have skied fifteen runs this afternoon if I didn't.

Yes, it is an acquired taste, and I know it. Others' mileage may, and certainly does, vary!

And even though I insist that I like these conditions as much as any other, I do look forward to the variety of conditions and terrain that will come with more snow. I do suffer from moguls withdrawal (we have a few small ones, but the coverage is fairly thin). I look forward to skiing the steeps, bowls, and glades that are not currently skiable (at least not without accepting significant risk of ski damage or worse). But really, as great as last season was, I actually missed the chance to challenge myself on hard snow. So I relish this opportunity now. The snow will come....

wink.gif

For those who do not enjoy skiing hard snow--or any other condition--sometimes it just takes a conscious shift in your perspective. I know I can't make as good a turn, certainly as consistently, on these conditions, but that's not what I'm looking for. There are conditions where even the best can't buy three good turns in a row. But once you realize that there are other things for sale there, it can become a great experience. It's not powder--which is great also, of course. But if we stop comparing it to other conditions, and accept it simply for what it is, rather than wishing for what it isn't, a whole new world of enjoyment and reward awaits! (But do tune your skis!)

All right--enough zen! I know, I'm weird to like hard snow. I understand those who don't. I'll go now....

Best regards,
Bob
post #12 of 28

^^^^We have continued to have a blast at the early Winter Park season.  Funny to hear the almost apologetic tone for enjoying perfectly good conditions on the frontside. ski.gif

post #13 of 28

"Groomed packed powder" is what we had at Eldora yesterday-just like what we ski on frequently back east. Conditions would have been great for racing!

Too bad my quiver of race skis was 3000 miles away-slaloms and cheater GS skis would have been perfect.

post #14 of 28

In CO, it's pretty good early in the morning, from 8:30-10:30, before the corduroy is scraped off and the ice emerges. If you're sick of the ice, it's fun to lap runs with a shallower pitch. IMO, hard snow conditions are a great opportunity to work on finding the sweet spot of your skis, and pressuring the tips. The edge doesn't lie; it either holds or it doesn't. These conditions may not be a blast, but they are useful.

 

But I admit, if I weren't a passholder, and I was planning an expensive trip to a great area, I'd be pretty ticked off with the conditions. Luckily, I can be patient. wink.gif

post #15 of 28

Certainly subscribe to getting as much in first thing in the morning . I was just lookin at the Mid Vail Mtn. Cam and traffic looked very light for Christmas week at 9:20 AM. I have to assume people sleep in except it to soften up later etc. But with a 19 in base, I'd bet that after the courdoury is skied off, it's pretty slick the rest of the day.

 

I was out at Vail for 4 days the first week of Dec. We enjoyed it and it did snow (fortunately) the last two days. Didn't mind the "hard snow" as it still was probably as good as what we would call pretty decent here at home. I was a little concerned with the traffic on the limited runs that were open.

 

Kind of got the feeling after a few hours that I was beginning to press my luck a bit. Nothing really against snowboarders OK, but the loud scraping sounds on firm conditions makes me a bit ancy.

 

 

post #16 of 28

I've gotten out a few times this year, and am going up this coming weekend.  It's nice out.  There is enough man made snow to cover everything, and it's fast out there.  I'm a powder hound and yes, I'm praying for snow like no other, but I'm happy to be out there.  It's been sunny, not too crowded except for Avanti lift from what I've seen, and I find myself making much longer runs.  I usually visit vista bahn once each day, to get to the rest of the mountain, but now I'm skiing from mountaintop to vista bahn all the time.  Each time I've gone I've found the snow conditions are best on berries and pickeroon.  I also spent almost all of last year in BSB, so it's been kinda nice to get to know more of the front side of the mountain and Game Creek Bowl.  It's been a nice warm up to what is going to be my biggest season to date. 

post #17 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Depends on your perspective, I suppose, UGASkiDawg. As I said, I personally very much enjoy skiing on hard snow. Not only is it a special challenge, but when you get it right and make a decent turn, it's especially rewarding--with sensations I just cannot get in soft "easy" snow. Don't get me wrong--I love powder too, and I look forward to the day we get some. But I am not kidding when I say that I enjoy these firm conditions. I wouldn't have skied fifteen runs this afternoon if I didn't.
Yes, it is an acquired taste, and I know it. Others' mileage may, and certainly does, vary!
And even though I insist that I like these conditions as much as any other, I do look forward to the variety of conditions and terrain that will come with more snow. I do suffer from moguls withdrawal (we have a few small ones, but the coverage is fairly thin). I look forward to skiing the steeps, bowls, and glades that are not currently skiable (at least not without accepting significant risk of ski damage or worse). But really, as great as last season was, I actually missed the chance to challenge myself on hard snow. So I relish this opportunity now. The snow will come....
wink.gif
For those who do not enjoy skiing hard snow--or any other condition--sometimes it just takes a conscious shift in your perspective. I know I can't make as good a turn, certainly as consistently, on these conditions, but that's not what I'm looking for. There are conditions where even the best can't buy three good turns in a row. But once you realize that there are other things for sale there, it can become a great experience. It's not powder--which is great also, of course. But if we stop comparing it to other conditions, and accept it simply for what it is, rather than wishing for what it isn't, a whole new world of enjoyment and reward awaits! (But do tune your skis!)
All right--enough zen! I know, I'm weird to like hard snow. I understand those who don't. I'll go now....
Best regards,
Bob


Sounds like you're doing some New England skiing, Bob.   "Firm" is an understatement, perhaps?  Are you skiing under thaw/freeze conditions?

 

post #18 of 28
Quote:
Are you skiing under thaw/freeze conditions?

Actually no, LiquidFeet. We've had very little snow, but we've also had very little warm weather. The past few days have been sunny and beautiful, but not overly warm--not above freezing. Conditions in Colorado (except in the south) are mainly manmade firm snow, still bulletproof in some places, but not glare ice.

Best regards,
Bob
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Quote:
Are you skiing under thaw/freeze conditions?
Actually no, LiquidFeet. We've had very little snow, but we've also had very little warm weather. The past few days have been sunny and beautiful, but not overly warm--not above freezing. Conditions in Colorado (except in the south) are mainly manmade firm snow, still bulletproof in some places, but not glare ice.
Best regards,
Bob

 

Bulletproof I am all-too familiar with.  It's odd to be skiing pretty regularly on firm man-made snow, then reading on Epic about trying something then looking back to see your tracks.  When you can't penetrate the "snow" with your pole no matter how hard you smash it into the surface, you're not going to be able to see your tracks.

 

When lots of people crowd up on this firm stuff and ski off the corduroy ribs, what's left I call frozen suede.   I think of the loose granules collecting at the side of the trail as salt.  If it's warm enough for the suede to melt a bit and refreeze, thus getting too smooth to be suede any more, it's formica.  Salt on formica has been common here so far this season.   
 

 

post #20 of 28
Great description, LiquidFeet. I wouldn't say we've had "salt on formica" here, but "salt on frozen suede" describes it pretty well!

But I submit that it is possible to make complete turns with visible tracks on even the smoothest, hardest ice. Possible--not easy, of course! Very sharp edges, and very clean technique, will do it. Those tracks won't be "ruts," but more like the fine, sharp lines ice skates will inscribe on a hockey rink. If you can stand on it, it's possible to turn on it--and with superlative technique, it's possible to turn even on ice you cannot stand still on. It may not be easy, and it may not bring consistent success, but it's great training simply to try!

----

But please don't let me scare anyone away. We do not have that "pond ice" hockey-rink surface here in Colorado (yet), or anything really close to it. Conditions really are not that "good for you"--they're actually pretty good. Particularly, as others have suggested, early in the morning before the corduroy ridges get scraped off to form loose "salt."

And there is at least a reasonable chance for a little snow tomorrow and tomorrow night in the forecast!

Best regards,
Bob
post #21 of 28

I had better sharpen my edges before my business+ski trip out there in two weeks! Conditions sound just right for my one-ski quiver (Volkl AC30).

 

post #22 of 28
Yes, Jeff--tune 'em up!

On the other hand, we did get a little snow out of the windy storm that passed through in last couple days. Only a couple inches, but it was enough to drastically change the surface conditions. Not nearly enough, of course, to open the bowls and steeps and other off-piste runs, but I heard a whole lot of comments about how much better the snow was with that little bit of snow.

But I'm still amazed how so many people equate "good" with "easy." A little mindset adjustment is all it takes to enjoy challenging conditions--especially when you know how much it will help your skiing in more user-friendly snow, and everywhere else. I like "good" conditions as much as anyone else. But I'd get bored quickly if that was all there was.

Do hard things! (But do keep your skis sharp.)

And consider subscribing to the REAL skier's magazine (no more of that sissy-easy soft powder fluff!):

600

cool.gif

Best regards,
Bob
post #23 of 28
For what it's worth, I did catch a long-range weather forecast for Colorado's northern and central mountains (Summit County, Vail, Winter Park, Steamboat, Aspen, etc.) today. Apparently, they're forecasting a continuation of the high pressure system here that's been sending the Jet Stream (and all the snow) either north or south of us, for a while. Then, in late January and February, they're forecasting a big change, with a strong possibility of above-average snowfall in the northern and central mountains.

I don't know who "they" are that made this forecast (heard it on the radio as I was driving), and I'll believe it when I see it. But it sounds encouraging, at least.

Best regards,
Bob
post #24 of 28

 

Sounds better than the dust-on-glass conditions out here.  Took my skis in for a tune; had them dial up the edge angles.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

For what it's worth, I did catch a long-range weather forecast for Colorado's northern and central mountains (Summit County, Vail, Winter Park, Steamboat, Aspen, etc.) today. Apparently, they're forecasting a continuation of the high pressure system here that's been sending the Jet Stream (and all the snow) either north or south of us, for a while. Then, in late January and February, they're forecasting a big change, with a strong possibility of above-average snowfall in the northern and central mountains.
I don't know who "they" are that made this forecast (heard it on the radio as I was driving), and I'll believe it when I see it. But it sounds encouraging, at least.
Best regards,
Bob


Well, I'm flying out to Colorado in late January, so I'd appreciate it if "they" could make it change before then.  I don't need to fly 2000 miles to ski dust-on-crust.  smile.gif

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

For what it's worth, I did catch a long-range weather forecast for Colorado's northern and central mountains (Summit County, Vail, Winter Park, Steamboat, Aspen, etc.) today. Apparently, they're forecasting a continuation of the high pressure system here that's been sending the Jet Stream (and all the snow) either north or south of us, for a while. Then, in late January and February, they're forecasting a big change, with a strong possibility of above-average snowfall in the northern and central mountains.
I don't know who "they" are that made this forecast (heard it on the radio as I was driving), and I'll believe it when I see it. But it sounds encouraging, at least.
Best regards,
Bob


This "forecast" was probably a long-range outlook from the Climate Prediction Center, part of the National Weather Service (NWS) at the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). See http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/

 

Note that these long-range outlooks are very coarse (large area) and should be thought of as highly-educated guesses -- these are not considered actual forecasts. You'll notice the maps just suggest whether temperature and precipitation are likely to be above normal, below normal or equal to normal compared to past long-term climate averages.

 

post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Conditions here are "firm," but in many places, the coverage is excellent. Firm is an acquired taste, but at least as for me, I've absolutely enjoyed the challenge of it this early season. I had some free time this afternoon, and I skied fifteen runs off Copper Mountain's "Exelerator" lift on the top, working on my slalom turns.
We won't have much of the back country "off-piste" runs open--including the runs off Alpine and Resolution lifts, as well as Spaulding, Copper, and Jupiter Bowls--until we get a good bit more snow. But anyone who can't find great challenge on the front side runs either has not enough imagination, doesn't understand what a good turn is, or just doesn't care. As far as I'm concerned the skiing is--as all skiing is--great!
wink.gif
Best regards, and Merry Christmas!
Bob Barnes


several years ago we were in copper during a time with little recent snow and firm conditions, while in a lesson the instructor ask me if i was from the east coast, said i was the only one in his group that wasn't skidding around and bitchin about the snow, took that as a compliment!!
 

 

post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

I like "good" conditions as much as anyone else. But I'd get bored quickly if that was all there was.
 


Man, I understand the optimism but come on.smile.gif    I've been at Copper every week this month...had the most fun scraping my skis on Mine Dump and even enjoyed that little stretch of upper Triple Treat.  Other than that it's groomer calisthenics and avoiding the mad bombers.

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