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Five minute micro review: Rossi E98 !!!

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Just took it out today for the first time. A crisp and cold morning, I was able to get out alone on empty slopes. The Rossignol E98 held fresh groomers like a hockey skate. I'm 6'"2 @ am at fighting weight at 185lbs.

The 180 (Radius 20m) I thought would be undersized, but after running into Mr. Peters, who assured assured me I was in the rght size, I knew he was right. I thought the tail was soft when flexing the ski, by tracked well. The forefoot rocker is not excessive. Of course in today's conditions it didn't matter. I felt stable at speed. The E 98 could be stopped very fast- effortlessly accepting edge.

One of our rental guys did the tune- it was plenty sharp for the groomers. Off trail, 98mm under foot was a nice change from my usual 192 Atomic Atlas @ 125mm underfoot.

The ski is torsionally rigid and skied great in a variety of conditions. I loved it! Great job Rossi!

5 minute review, done!
post #2 of 15

Did you get a chance to take them through some moguls? How did they do?

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
In general, I try to avoid the bumps whenever possible.

But... The Rossignol E 98 did great. Most skis with forefoot rocker do pretty well in the bumps. This ski was no exception. I got to ski some bumps under the Expert Chutes and over towards Casper lift. In JH, at some point, you'll have to ski the bumps. Lots of entrances and exits to popular runs- even in a snowy year- and you'll have to ski some bumps.

Powder > Corduroy > Bumps
post #4 of 15

I love this ski. I told TPJ, that he also would be happy with the E98 in a 180.

post #5 of 15

I have a pair in 180's sitting in my garage waiting for some good local snow, or for my trip to Mammoth at the end of January.  Can't wait to try them out.  I am glad to hear they work well in bumps as I tend to find myself in bumps even when I am not looking for them. 

 

Were you able to try them out in any deeper untracked?  If so, how do they float?  Even though these are not a dedicated powder ski, for an eastern guy like myself, I bought these to be my western soft and deep snow ski for my couple of trips out west this year.

 

Thanks for the mini review.

 

Rick G

post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 

No deep pow.  I did however, get to ski them in some really nice gunpowder.  Snow guns work great- at the right temps.  Yesterday morning's magic mix of low temps, the right ambient humidity and proper snow gun nozzle choice made for some excellent conditions along the skiers left of Casper lift. 

 

I skied several laps of textbook gunpowder- about 8 inches worth.  Very fun!  I would think this ski would handle great in the deep stuff.  At speed it floated nicely and the tip was great.  As with snowmaking, there were plenty of ice chunks laying around to surprise me underfoot- I though the tip was rigid enough to not deflect in cruddy conditions.

 

From gunpowder, icy crud, death cookies, dust on crust, steep bumps and pristine groomers- I'll be taking this ski out again.

post #7 of 15

I got it in a 180 and do love it.  I'm saving it for a little more snow.  I don't mind trashing a ski, but don't want to do it all at once at the beginning of the seasonredface.gif.  I've been using them if I know I will be staying on AV or Casper.  I haven't had a chance to ski any real bumps, but feel like it shouldn't be a problem.  I have always liked a stiff ski and preferred skis with metal.  The one exception that comes to mind is the S7 I was riding last year.  I still have them because I wouldn't give them back at the end of the season, but I haven't seen the need to bring them out yet.  Once the snow arrives and the season starts for real my 2 ski quiver will be the 188 S7 and the 180 E98.

 

BTW Phil I think you told me to go to 172.  This seems very short to me, but I will demo it after the rush is over.  I didn't notice a lot of difference between the 178 and the 186 E88 as far as one being harder to ski than the other.  So I am still wanting to try the 188 E98, but am very happy with the 180.  IMO the E98 is a far better ski than the E88 and I did enjoy the E88.

 

For those who have never met me, I'm 5'10" 175 lbs.  Skiing in Jackson and Bob Peters are both bigger guys than me.  I think Stephan would probably enjoy the 188 E98 if we had it for demo.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

I love this ski. I told TPJ, that he also would be happy with the E98 in a 180.



 

post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I got it in a 180 and do love it.  I'm saving it for a little more snow.  I don't mind trashing a ski, but don't want to do it all at once at the beginning of the seasonredface.gif.  I've been using them if I know I will be staying on AV or Casper.  I haven't had a chance to ski any real bumps, but feel like it shouldn't be a problem.  I have always liked a stiff ski and preferred skis with metal.  The one exception that comes to mind is the S7 I was riding last year.  I still have them because I wouldn't give them back at the end of the season, but I haven't seen the need to bring them out yet.  Once the snow arrives and the season starts for real my 2 ski quiver will be the 188 S7 and the 180 E98.

 

BTW Phil I think you told me to go to 172.  This seems very short to me, but I will demo it after the rush is over.  I didn't notice a lot of difference between the 178 and the 186 E88 as far as one being harder to ski than the other.  So I am still wanting to try the 188 E98, but am very happy with the 180.  IMO the E98 is a far better ski than the E88 and I did enjoy the E88.

 

For those who have never met me, I'm 5'10" 175 lbs.  Skiing in Jackson and Bob Peters are both bigger guys than me.  I think Stephan would probably enjoy the 188 E98 if we had it for demo.
 

 

 

From my PM to you...

 

 

...The ski skis fantastic and I am trying to justify getting a pair for myself too. Ski the 180 and 188..I hope I am wrong, but I think the 180 is the choice...especially if it used in a quiver and you have a big ski to of with it....

 

post #9 of 15

Hey Phil,

 

Still waiting to try mine.  Berkshire East is supposed to open on Monday.  I'll take them up, but will probably ski an old set of slalom skis until I'm sure I won't destroy them on the first day.  I'll post a review of the '98 at some point this week assuming I get to ski them.  I'm looking forward to it.

 

I'm 50yo 6'2". 210 pounds (should be about 200 pounds a month into ski season).  I ski patrol and like to ski pretty much everything but groomers.  I mean a day in the groomers beats a day at work, but it's not my first choice.

 

John

post #10 of 15

I've just picked up some E98s in the 180 length, 6 months before our season kicks off so I'm pretty stoked and excited while having to be incredibly patient. I've read great things about this ski including this thread and think they will be great for the conditions here in NZ. I've also been reading that they are an 'expert' ski which I'm clearly not. Any thoughts whether they might be too much ski for an advancing hard intermediate(ish) skier?

post #11 of 15

I've had the S3's for a year now and have found them to be an excellent all around ski. Find it very good in the bumps, crud, and 8"powder. Pretty good in the steeps and groomed.

 

I figure the E98 would be better in the groomed? Any other big differences?

post #12 of 15

My quick review after 2 days skiing it in 180 length on what is euphemistically called 'eastern packed powder'.  Very easy to ski.  Shmears easily, will carve if there is a layer of snow, does not hold on ice as well as race skis (big surprise there!).  Very easy to initiate, feels very playful for a ski this large.  There are enough people around on the slopes that I haven't really tried them at full speed but no red flags in the skiing so far.  I have been in some really small bumps, and they do fine and are very maneuverable in these bumps, but this is nothing like trying to ski a zipperline mid winter. 

 

To me this ski doesn't seem to be demanding at all, and should be a lot of fun when we get some real snow!  Until then, I'll probably take the Fischer Slaloms back out until we get some soft stuff.  Oh, and for ski patrolling, they seem to work well for most of the S&T skills.  They sideslip well, are grabby enough without being too grabby, and snowplow fine.  I did a couple of tail ropes on my slalom skis earlier in the week, and didn't really like the excessive grab of the slaloms. 

post #13 of 15

After a 15" dump I couldn't stand it any longer and grabbed my new 98's (180cm) to take to Holiday Valley in Western NY this past Saturday.  By the time I got there conditions were cut up and broken snow over top of frozen crud, most of which which wasn't groomed the night before, so the crud was very rough.  Perhaps not the best conditions to try out a new ski, not to mention a new category of ski for me.

 

Anyway, the first couple of runs were not what I would call a success.  I struggled a bit to find the sweet spot on the ski as I was being tossed around by the mixed snow conditions.  It felt like the tips were hooky and I was too far forward.  I was even wondering if I had made a mistake, going too wide and too long without demoing them first, but I know that sometimes skis take a bit of getting use to before they begin to shine, especially if they are significantly different than what you are currently skiing.  To top it off, my new boots were bothering me for the first time this season so I decided to take a break to readjust.  During my break, I decided to play around with the Marker Griffon Schizo binding I had chosen for this ski.  I had read a few reviews during my research that a few testers liked the ski better in rough snow when the binding was set back 1-2 cms.  The Schizo allows this type of adjustment, so I grabbed my trusty Victorinox and set the binding back 1 cm and took some emory cloth to the tips to detune them a bit.  The next couple or runs felt much better, but I still felt as if I was too far forward, so at my next break, I set them back an additional 1/2cm.  Soon after, a closed slope that I had been eyeing with lots of fresh and soft snow was opened and I got a chance to really try them in some relatively nice snow.  They felt great going through it.  I was gaining confidence on them and was feeling like I was in the sweet spot of the ski.  I was able to ski them down the fall line and into some smaller bumps with gusto.  They held well on the scrape and by the end of the day I felt as if I had some success.

 

Now these skis were not bought for around where I live, but for the trips out west that I take, so right now I am cautiously optomistic that I made the right ski choice.  I leave for Mammoth on the 27th, but unless some snow falls there real soon, I may be leaving these at homes and taking my Racetigers or AC30's instead.  Hopefully by the time I get to Big Sky in March, Momma Nature will have woken up and realized this is winter.

 

Rick G

post #14 of 15

OK, I just got back from Mammoth where I spent 6 sun filled days of skiing.  As most places out west, Dec and Jan were a bit dry.  But at the last minute, Mother Nature dumped 4 feet of snow over 3-4 days right before our arrival.  That opened up the mountain a bit, and gave us some off trail excursions that we would not have had otherwise.  However by the time we got there, the only freshies to be had was unskied frozen crud in the areas that still had plenty of rock showing.  So most of the week was skiing fresh groomers in the morning giving way to lots of scrape piles in the afternoon.  Off trail conditions ranged from dirt, windpack, packed powder, hardpack, bumps, rocks to the occasional pocket where some soft snow blew in.  And I must say that the E98's performed admirably in all of them, including the dirt and rocks from the look of my bases. 

 

On the fresh groomers in the morning, they were outrageous!  I was able to lay down some serious RR tracks with ease.  Later in the day as the groomers got scraped, the 98's barely noticed.  Off trail they handled hard bumps with ease as well as broken crud.  Wind pack and hardpack not a problem as long as you set an edge, which is fairly easy to do. I also liked the way they felt in the occasional soft snow which left me longing for a big dump to try some powder out, but not on this trip.   At speed, I don't think I have skied a more stable platform.  My cousin had the Mammoth app downloaded to his iPhone which tracked where we were and gave, vertical, top speed etc for each run.  I borrowed it for a steep groomed run off the top of Chair 3 and apparently hit 61 MPH without really trying hard.  When you have this ski on edge, you feel like you are on rails and invincible.  Very, very stable.  It always amazes me that a ski this big and wide can be so quick edge to edge allowing you to make quick tight turns to avoid rocks and boulders.  Yet they weren't a chore when you needed to go slower where approrpriate.   By the end of the week, I was really liking this ski and looking forward to trying it in some softer snow and some trees, hopefully in March when I go to Big Sky.

 

About me, 57 year old mountain master (I prefer that decsription to "expert"), 5' 9" 190 lbs.  Rossi E98 180cm mounted with Marker Jester Schizo bindings set 1.5cm (15mm) behind the mfg mark.  Lange RX 130 boots, Leki Trigger 1 poles.

 

Hope this helps someone.

 

Rick G

post #15 of 15

I sold my E98's earlier this season - thought I would post the comments of the buyer, who was skiing them at Steamboat before there was much snow there.  Personally I struggled with them in the bumps (still looking for the ideal ski there that still has good crud and groomer capability), but agree with his assessment of them.  They are 180cm.

 

 

"~I have been skiing here for 4 days. Unfortunately there has been no new snow yet, but the groomers are as good as they get. I skied my Soul 7's the first morning, then tried the 98's. I just love them, have been on them every day. They are like a GS ski on steroids. They just level everything out, totally unflappable. They have turned the steep blacks into blues. I am surprised at how quick they are, given their size. They will be my go to skis when there are no freshies. I have read that next year they will also have the air tip. That should make them even quicker. I never cease to be amazed at the technology improvements in skis."

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