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How many different languages have you heard on the lift in one day?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Yesterday was a somewhat surreal day in Oslo Winterpark. It was not very busy there, and for some hours I was skiing on my own. Being impatient, I always get on the lift asap, and not being very shy I always try to start a conversation with the other occupants of the chair.

 

Yesterday must've been some kind of record, at least it was for me. I spoke with people from : Norway, Sweden, Denmark ( those are a given ), Russia, Finland, England, Ireland, Brazil, France, Canada, Holland, Slovenia, Poland, Slovakia, Estonia, Lithuania and Italy.

 

OW is not a big resort, and as of now we only have one slope open ( working hard on opening more ). There was most likely other nationalities there as well, but these are the ones I met. Can anybody top this?

post #2 of 12
Can't even come close to topping that.

In Summit County it is pretty common to hear 3 different languages spoken on the bus (English, Spanish and one of the following- French, Russian or Polish). Pretty common to also run into Aussies and Brits.

At the Chamonix Club Med in 2004, I was the only native English speaker in my English lesson ski class- the instructor was local French but also spoke some Italian and German in addition to teaching in English while the students were Dutch, German and Swiss.
post #3 of 12

You will find that at Deer Valley quite often.

post #4 of 12

So Cal Bro

New Yawkin

Bahstonish

Joysey

Texan Y'all

Mayine

Minesootin

 

post #5 of 12

We get a lot of pacific rim folks from way out of town. However one of my most fun lessons was a French family of four with one who spoke a little english . I know about five words in French but we had a great time and found ways to communicate. 

 

It's cool the snow brings out the adventurous in a worldly manner. Another bridge to bring us closer.

post #6 of 12
Does redneck and drunkenese count?
post #7 of 12

When I was at Tremblant, it was exciting to hear "real" French spoken.  I had taken French in high school, but the real thing is on a whole different level.

 

I also heard french at Whiteface in the gondi.

 

 

 

As far as locally, I have heard quite a bit of Asian (assuming it was Chinese), and some un-identifiable European languages.  I've ridden the lift with some Aussies, but they don't speak a foreign language.  I've also hear heavy Canadian accents.

 

 

 

But nowhere near to MadMads's cultural explosion in Norway.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

When I was at Tremblant, it was exciting to hear "real" French spoken.  I had taken French in high school, but the real thing is on a whole different level.

 



Québécois is the only french that matters!  wink.gif

 

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post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



Québécois is the only french that matters!  wink.gif

 

untitled.png


The Canadienne (sp?) I met was from Québec but spoke English fluently with a very charming accent, almost as charming as the two french ladies did ( I did a pole sprint to get on both those chairs biggrin.gif ). I also spoke with a Kiwi, but he's a colleague and as I didn't ride a chair with him he doesn't count in this tally. The sales manager for the resort is an American, and we frequently hear many US dialects slopeside, just not that day. I also work with a Belgian lady - she mainly works with our ski school bookings and is fluent in Norwegian. 

 

post #10 of 12

Purely through coincidence, I was in St. Anton last January the same week they had some big conference, so there were groups from all over the world. I heard

 

German

French

English

Japanese

Hungarian

Russian

Croatian

Finnish

Swedish (probably Norwegian and Danish as well, but I don't know enough to distinguish them)

Polish (maybe Slovakian and Czech as well, but again I can't distinguish them)

Italian

Spanish

and I think Portugese, but I can't remember for certain on that one.

 

Luckily, the groups there for the conference had various matching outfits with the name of the country on the back or at least a flag on the chest or shoulder, so that made it easy. But, there were plenty of normal tourists as well from all over, so some of those were a bit more difficult to distinguish the language.

 

post #11 of 12

In the Arlberg last March I heard the following:

 

British

Irish

Scotish

Aussie

Kiwi

Texan

Queens, NY (Not to be mistaken with the Queens English)

Canadian

 

Along with a host of slavic languages, Germanic, scandanavian, and even arabic. Too many to count actually.

 

 

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

When I was at Tremblant, it was exciting to hear "real" French spoken.  I had taken French in high school, but the real thing is on a whole different level.

 

I also heard french at Whiteface in the gondi.

 

 

 

As far as locally, I have heard quite a bit of Asian (assuming it was Chinese), and some un-identifiable European languages.  I've ridden the lift with some Aussies, but they don't speak a foreign language.  I've also hear heavy Canadian accents.

 

 

 

But nowhere near to MadMads's cultural explosion in Norway.


One of the most interesting conversations I heard a few years back on my local hill was two teens speaking. One in english, and one in french. Quite funny to listen to one teen speak english, and then his buddy would answer in French. Occassionally the French teen would say something in english, like "powder", or "cool". And the American teen would say something in French, like, "oui", or "quoi?"
 

 

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