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Which Western USA ski resorts don't have tree-wells?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Are there any Western USA ski resorts that have mostly (or completely) the big/long-trunked evergreen trees that don't create tree wells because the branch-less trunk is so tall that tree wells don't form?

post #2 of 23

Branches help make them worse, but any tree can technically create a tree well.

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Branches help make them worse, but any tree can technically create a tree well.



Very true... but maybe a tree with just the trunk at the bottom would make a well so small it wouldn't catch people.

 

 

I'm thinking big tall skinny evergreens... like loblolly pines, carolina pines, etc. (and I don't know all the names, I'm sure there are much more)

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

worthless.gif

 

 

 

Ok, these trees aren't gonna be creating many tree wells.

 

 

addform2.gif

 

north-carolina-state-tree-pine-tree.jpg

 

frogpond.jpg

 

 

PineBrook2.jpg

 

You get the idea.

 

 

 

I know Steamboat and Sun Valley have ample trunk-only glades, but those are with deciduous trees I believe.  The latter creates a different ambiance.


Edited by Vitamin Ski - 12/20/11 at 2:12pm
post #5 of 23
Find a resort above the tree line and you'll find a resort without tree wells
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Find a resort above the tree line and you'll find a resort without tree wells


Thank you for the advice.

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Find a resort above the tree line and you'll find a resort without tree wells


roflmao.gifGood one.

 

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Find a resort above the tree line and you'll find a resort without tree wells


OR....... a resort with poor snow coverage!  Which pretty much is the Sierras so far this season!

 

post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post


roflmao.gifGood one.

 



Well..........its true!!!eek.gif

post #10 of 23

I have skied the trees at Brighton a lot over the past 6 years.  Never saw a tree well, even after the big storms.  The lower branches of the evergreens are generally high off the ground and maybe the snow is light enough to blow around and fill the wells.

 

 

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mel2221 View Post

I have skied the trees at Brighton a lot over the past 6 years.  Never saw a tree well, even after the big storms.  The lower branches of the evergreens are generally high off the ground and maybe the snow is light enough to blow around and fill the wells.

 

 


UT seems to be relatively free from treewells in most resorts.  Snow-basin in particular.

 

Beaver Mt actually has many stands of Subalpine fir which create tree wells once the snow is deep. 

 

 

post #12 of 23

I WISH we had enough snow for treewells!!  

 

Really hurting here so far.

post #13 of 23



Pretty bad when we're hoping to see tree-wells..

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I WISH we had enough snow for treewells!!  

 

Really hurting here so far.



 

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Are there any Western USA ski resorts that have mostly (or completely) the big/long-trunked evergreen trees that don't create tree wells because the branch-less trunk is so tall that tree wells don't form?



treewells can also be caused by the heat that the trees cause from a. being living b. having a dark surface that reflects the sun energy.

 

with that said UT has less tree wells due to nearly constant snowfall.

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



 

with that said UT has less tree wells due to nearly constant snowfall.



Boy, don't let the trees at Mt. Baker know. Or Whistler. Or Crystal... or..... BW, it's constant snowfall that causes tree wells. smile.gif  If I recall, UT has more deciduous than evergreen trees, so probably fewer issues. West coast, more evergreens + loads of snow... = big well potential. SIS deaths last season nationwide in the US (Snow Immersion Suffocation including tree wells, landing upside down in drifts or hucking, etc...)  were 9 total. 

post #16 of 23

The PC resorts have mostly deciduous trees, except on the very tops of the mtns, maybe top 1/5th.  The Cottonwood resorts all have mostly conifers on the I would say the top 2/3rds.

But I always wondered why UT doesn't seem to have tree wells? 

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowbirdDevotee View Post

But I always wondered why UT doesn't seem to have tree wells? 


Maybe for the same reasons it doesn't really have beer?

 

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post


Maybe for the same reasons it doesn't really have beer?

 



Mormons won't allow tree wells?

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post



Mormons won't allow tree wells?


I did have the Polygamy Porter last time I was in UT and it was pretty damn good - maybe tree wells aren't far behind?

 

post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



tree wells can also be caused by the heat that the trees cause from a. being living b. having a dark surface that reflects the sun energy.

 

with that said UT has less tree wells due to nearly constant snowfall
 

 

My son found a tree well in UT, which prompted me to learn more about about the subject (http://www.treewelldeepsnowsafety.com/) and author a post. Avoiding any chance of falling into one is easy, but most of us just can't stay on groomed trails or ski Mt. Bachelor above the tree line. The next best option (I suppose) is to assume that "This can never happen to me!" will eventually happen. I now avoid being too close to individual evergreens, stick a whistle on my jacket (like I'll ever be able to reach it upside down with both hands pinned), avoid putting the pole straps around my wrists in trees, and never ski powder in tress alone.

post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

 

My son found a tree well in UT, which prompted me to learn more about about the subject (http://www.treewelldeepsnowsafety.com/) and author a post. Avoiding any chance of falling into one is easy, but most of us just can't stay on groomed trails or ski Mt. Bachelor above the tree line. The next best option (I suppose) is to assume that "This can never happen to me!" will eventually happen. I now avoid being too close to individual evergreens, stick a whistle on my jacket (like I'll ever be able to reach it upside down with both hands pinned), avoid putting the pole straps around my wrists in trees, and never ski powder in tress alone.


I think it depends very much on the trees, what species, what size etc... if you are skiing in a grove of mature doug fir or lodge pole, the trees are too large to produce tree wells. Subalpine or medium sized fir / spruce on the other hand...

 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Find a resort above the tree line and you'll find a resort without tree wells


Another time honored approach (at least this year) is to find a resort with no snow.  There won't be any tree wells there either.smile.gif
 

 

post #23 of 23

All of them right now :(

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