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2 1/2 Year Old - Teaching Recommendations

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

 

 

 

I'm so excited to get my 2 year old little girl on skis this winter and have been looking into various training aids out there.
 
Anyone have thoughts on the Lucky Bums leash/harness approach?
 
This looks like an interesting alternative:
 
And last, the handle for lift loading looks like a good idea:
 
Thanks in advance for your thoughts, recommendations, and experience.
Best,
Jeff

 

post #2 of 26

I like the harness, but to start keep her on the flats play with her and get her use to having fun and comfortable on the equipment. When you start her on the hill make it a very low slope. you can walk with her and talk to her and push her along with a hand at her back getting her use to gliding and then have her push the heal out one at a time while walking up and down the small slope.

After she gets use to this take her down a slightly larger slope and add the harness . get her pushing out 2 heals and make (Everyone say it!! ) a pizza.

Remember she is only 2 1/2 don't expect the world but be very positive in what she does do. when she wants to go up ,tell her as soon as we learn how to make big pizza and turn . I wouldn't take her up a large hill until she is well balanced and can stop by doing this....no need to scare her you want her to have fun.

 

LS and I taught both our kids at a young age, our oldest we took up too early and expected to much for his age ( 3) I think he still secretly harbors resentment for us from it.

The second we didn't take up the big hill until lots of days playing on a very little hill, he learned fast loved it and now resents us for totally different reasons then his brother.

 

Have fun!!

post #3 of 26

Wow that is young.  At 2 1/2 I took my son out in our yard on little play skis and also had him stand on my skis, again just in our yard.  Started him for real at 3 1/2. (each kid is different though) I think the most important thing is that they get comfortable moving around with skis attached.  As Old Boot says, spend a lot of time on the flats.  I used to play games with my son where  I would throw some snow at him then scoot out of his reach so he would have to move to catch me.  I also taught him how to throw snow from the tops of his skis by snapping the tail down.  Once she has learned some basics, lots of mileage on low angle slopes.  I learned to snowboard so I wouldn't be bored spending a day on novice runs.

post #4 of 26

At that age you aren't so much teaching her as helping her have fun.  If she learns something in the process that's a plus, but keep your expectations low.  She needs to enjoy the snow first and foremost.

 

And welcome to Epic.

post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 

Fun first, no question about that!

Thanks for the replies so far.

 

I think I'm going to play around with the Hookease (check out the video if you're curious) and give the Lucky Bums trainer as a gift so I get to try out both!  I'll keep you guys posted on how it turns out.

 

More thoughts are appreciated too!

post #6 of 26

yeah just try to keep it fun and playing games, anything they can do on skis is fine, they are learning plenty just standing, walking etc. One thing to keep in mind is that you will spend a lot of time getting ready, going up to the mountain, getting gear on etc and she might cry and be fussy with in minutes. Time to stop, go in get hot chocolate or some other treat, bag it for the day. Other times you might get a whole 1/2 hour, maybe an hour or two if she is really having FUN. If you have the chance and snow in the back yard just let her play around in her boots and skis there, if she is into it she'll want to put on her boots and maybe walk around in them and with skis in the house,( floors are cheap, life time love of skiing is priceless and you could get this developed at age 2) highly encourage this also. If you push too hard it could ingrain a sense of dread and no fun to her. Its all about playing with your kids. Warning if she develops this ski bug it is gonna cost you, but in my family it is the best $$ I've ever spent.

post #7 of 26

First, I'll be honest.  I do not have the skills to teach my kid how to ski.  I could teach an adult, but not a 3 year old.  I really struggled with that concept last year - a lot.  Once I accepted that, it got a lot more fun.   That said, he's taking lessons this year at 3 1/2 where he'll have other kids his age and an instructor who knows how to teach 3 year olds...

 

Gear:

I assume you will not get the Lucky Bum skis, and will invest in regular skis/boots.

We got the harness - FAIL.  I have several friends who are instructors for kids and they ALL agree harnesses are not very useful because the kids are pulled which causes even more backseat skiing.  We stopped with the harness, and now he skis better than his buddy who is on a harness.  We just use very gentle slopes, and I ski behind him or switch in front of him. 

 

Other tips we've picked up on:

1. I watch a lot of ski porn, and would talk to my kid about some basic concepts like parts of a ski, clothes, goggles, and even some of the tricks.

2. We did a lot of skiing in the living room.  Put the boots on, walk around, click in skis, ski around the couch, click out, repeat.  It's really cool that my kid can take his skis on/off, and understands downhill ski first. Oh, and he can carry his own skis properly, too. THis really puts the icing on the cake when he walks by a 40 year old tourist :)

3. We even did side stepping up and down the stairs which has helped him be able to move up the hill.

4. We ski with friends his age.  This was key for us because he does much better seeing his friends doing it and being more social.

5. Bluebird days only. We really make sure we're out on sunny mild days.

 

Have fun!

 

 

post #8 of 26

I used the harness for both my kids, but turned it upside down and under the legs.  However, the design of the harness back then is different from the pic on your link and the newer design might not work they way I described.   I found that using the harness the way that it was designed to be used led to my kids pulling back.  With it attached the way I described, the two "control" straps are at hip  level and not mid back as you see in the picture.  This produced a more balanced stance for my kids.  It also allowed me to steer them, sort of like a stunt kite.  We weaned them from the harness as soon as possible, but the harness allowed us to get on the slopes earlier than otherwise and they had fun.  My son was independent on skis before he was fully out of diapers, but my daughter took longer.

 

In addition to the harness, I also used an Edgy Wedgy.

 

post #9 of 26

Another tip - carry some candy...nothing like a good sugar rush to get you kid down that last run of the afternoon.  They tend to go hard and run out of steam all at once.

 

 

 

post #10 of 26

Wow, I think this is the best advice I've ever seen on teaching very young children under 5.  All the exercises done at home will help them have fun in a warm environment, help build their muscles used for skiing and build an excitement for the sport in small spurts.  The advice to only go on blue bird days is just awesome.  The kids are so much happier when they don't have to contend with the cold along with learning to ski.  Knowing how to put on the skis and take them off... that's priceless.

 

Love you list.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by VoiceOfTheSnowboarder View Post

First, I'll be honest.  I do not have the skills to teach my kid how to ski.  I could teach an adult, but not a 3 year old.  I really struggled with that concept last year - a lot.  Once I accepted that, it got a lot more fun.   That said, he's taking lessons this year at 3 1/2 where he'll have other kids his age and an instructor who knows how to teach 3 year olds...

 

Gear:

I assume you will not get the Lucky Bum skis, and will invest in regular skis/boots.

We got the harness - FAIL.  I have several friends who are instructors for kids and they ALL agree harnesses are not very useful because the kids are pulled which causes even more backseat skiing.  We stopped with the harness, and now he skis better than his buddy who is on a harness.  We just use very gentle slopes, and I ski behind him or switch in front of him. 

 

Other tips we've picked up on:

1. I watch a lot of ski porn, and would talk to my kid about some basic concepts like parts of a ski, clothes, goggles, and even some of the tricks.

2. We did a lot of skiing in the living room.  Put the boots on, walk around, click in skis, ski around the couch, click out, repeat.  It's really cool that my kid can take his skis on/off, and understands downhill ski first. Oh, and he can carry his own skis properly, too. THis really puts the icing on the cake when he walks by a 40 year old tourist :)

3. We even did side stepping up and down the stairs which has helped him be able to move up the hill.

4. We ski with friends his age.  This was key for us because he does much better seeing his friends doing it and being more social.

5. Bluebird days only. We really make sure we're out on sunny mild days.

 

Have fun!

 

 



 

post #11 of 26

Go slow, make it fun, for the kid. As soon as it's not fun, find some. Videos of my 2 y o grand daughter. The 2nd is a few weeks after the first.

 

post #12 of 26

the obvious: only go out when the snow is really, really good. helps with a feel for sliding being fun. look at day one on great packed powder, about 25 degrees.

here I just touch his hips with a pincer grip when necessary, otherwise he's on his own, I'm actually following him around. this shot around 1994

 

Meadow chr. Alpine Meadows 94.jpg

post #13 of 26

First of all fantastic to get her started so young! I wouldn't think at all about anything remotely technical even like pizza just yet. It's actually a really complex mechanical movement pattern. She probably won't get it for a while yet. Play in the snow with skis on. She'll develop some moves of her own that work for her. My biggest piece of advice though is don't overdo it. Keep it in small segments. Go for a drink. Get warm. Don't let her get to a point where she associates skiing with being miserable, cold, bored etc.

 

I had our three kids skiing very young, the youngest before her 2nd birthday. We just had some fun. It's hard work and you won't get much skiing done yourself but it's so worthwhile. They're all in their 20s now and passionate about skiing and the mountains. My son has worked as a skipro for a number of years and the girls want to do some instructor training when their studies are finally over. You are developing a lifelong passion for your daughter. I'm sure she'll never stop thanking you for giving her the opportunity when she's older.

post #14 of 26

Sticking to your question regarding gear for a 2 yr old.  I couldn't check out the last link but I think that is the same handle we used on our girls (from applerise).  We only used it to help getting on/off the lift when they were 2 or 3 or helping them to get up from falls.  My oldest is only 6 yrs and my youngest 3.5 yrs so we are still using the handle for safety on lifts (mostly for piece of mind for us adults).  We really loved the handle and highly recommend it.  Although we purchased leashes too we never ended up using them.  Instead we invested in lessons which proved to be the best skiing investment we made.  Last winter our youngest was only 2.5 and could not sign up for group lessons so we did a private lesson (only one).  In one lesson our awesome teacher (Jane from Timberline) had her skiing down the bunny hill using the hula hoop as her teaching tool.  We continued to work on the skills (our instructor showed us what to do) and she skied another 6 times or so that season and was able to ski down the bunny hill (with us in front of her skiing backwards) doing pizza and some turns.  My oldest also did not use any ski devices and was skiing independently down all the beginner hills by 3.5 yrs.  Keep in mind we are only recreational skiers who ski maybe 10-15 times per season.  My oldest did group lessons only (but often they turned into private or semi-private due to her ability).  We also did many things others recommended (like skiing in our yard, practicing putting on skis in the house, sliding on the carpet in the house, staring with plastic skis and regular boots, etc..) to get our girls used to the equipment before heading to the slopes.   Good luck and let us know how it goes!

post #15 of 26

My opinion is that she shouldn't be on ANY kind of hill until she can control her movements and is old enough to understand the code.

 

Stay on the bunny slope or with instructors that can command safe areas of the slopes.

 

And if you need a "device" to ride the lift you're not ready to ride the lift.

 

I think I saw a hundred little kids at Sugarbush this week.

 

The kids with a parent as a teacher were to a kid in a wedge, in the backseat, staring at their ski tips and making random

and therefore unpredictable turns.

 

The Mini-Bears in ski school had hands and eyes forward, and were learning to foot-steer into turns. Even the 3year-olds were being

taught to stay french fires.

 

Having said that, perhaps some parents are awesome teachers. And yet, if leashing was a good instructional method, ski school would use it.

 

They don't.

 

Just my 2¢. And I am at the point in my life where I understand that even while I am certain that I am absolutely right does not mean other people are wrong.

 

Cheers.

 

@

post #16 of 26

you have to see Lloyd Browns 3 year old ski the pipe, kidstoke thread, or wooley's granddaughter ripping the hill (in this thread) and then consider the notion of limiting them in any way.  I cannot watch the tiny kids on the hill without laughing out loud in pure joy.

 

some parents are instructors or coaches also.

 

The other day I overheard my son talking to his ski buddies: my dad taught me so I got the sh&t. I was so happy to hear him say that. The bonding of teaching your kid is the best stuff. 'Course, you have to teach well and right. I gave him some group lessons cause he liked hangin' with kids his age also and the natural competition between kids is a great driving force for growth.

 

Often I see a parent teaching and things are going poorly. The kid is rotating. Then I see the parent ski: rotating. Very bad to teach your incorrect technique. Very, very bad. So be honest with yourself: do you want your child to ski better than you someday? Are you good enough to teach?

 

post #17 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Allison Matura View Post

My opinion is that she shouldn't be on ANY kind of hill until she can control her movements and is old enough to understand the code.

 

Stay on the bunny slope or with instructors that can command safe areas of the slopes.

 

And if you need a "device" to ride the lift you're not ready to ride the lift.

 

I think I saw a hundred little kids at Sugarbush this week.

 

The kids with a parent as a teacher were to a kid in a wedge, in the backseat, staring at their ski tips and making random

and therefore unpredictable turns.

 

The Mini-Bears in ski school had hands and eyes forward, and were learning to foot-steer into turns. Even the 3year-olds were being

taught to stay french fires.

 

Having said that, perhaps some parents are awesome teachers. And yet, if leashing was a good instructional method, ski school would use it.

 

They don't.

 

Just my 2¢. And I am at the point in my life where I understand that even while I am certain that I am absolutely right does not mean other people are wrong.

 

Cheers.

 

@




quote for tons of truth.

 

Leasing is not a good method! If the kids need to be leashed you are on to steep of a hill!

 

I am simply appauled by some of the things I hear parents tell children while 'teaching" them.

 

Today I over heard a dad on 200cm straights telling his 6 year old soon that his legs will be less tired if he goes straighter........ in a massive power wedge down a Blue that has pitches over 25 degrees on it. who ever gets to teach that kid in actual ski lesson I feel sorry for!

 

 

post #18 of 26

Ehhh......I'll be the Grumpy Lady here. And I know my grumpiness has to do with insufferable parents who outfit their 2 year olds in top-to-bottom Arc', or HH,

leash up their kids, then push them down the hill and call a long, straight slow-bomb "skiing". Your kid is not skiing. They are sliding slowly. Their turns are an effect of

terrain, not purposeful intention. One ski got bumped and during the reverse arm-windmill they quite by accident unweighted one ski. They fall down. You pick them up.

They cry. They are cold. You gave them poles? You could remove the entire front of their boot and it wouldn't matter, because their shins never actually touch it.

 

Their parents are always named Madeline and Spencer. Or Hunter Leigh and Spencer.

Spencer is always skiing switch so he can GoPro the Darling. Spencer nails a nice kid practicing

what he learned in school that morning. Spencer tells the kids' parents that the code doesn't apply when you're switch.

 

Maddy and Spencer give ski school instructors haughty stares when ski school gets to "cut the line" at the lift.

 

Hunter Leigh and Spencer don't care that their leash just Sesame Street garrotted 5 kids in ski school when Darling made a

sudden and unpredictable traverse through the line of skiers.

 

Maddy and Spencer and Darling head for the quad. The quad??? Maddy and Darling bolt the line and turn their quad ride into a double.

No strangers, please! Spencer bolts the line and turns the quad into a single because he has to safeguard three backpacks, poles and the completely unnecessary

CamelBak that Darling dropped.

 

They take Darling to a blue. Darling has a screaming @#$& attack so Spencer picks up Darling and attempts to ski

Darling down. Spencer gives patrol an earful when they tell him if he's going to carry Darling, he's got to walk it skis-off.

 

I hate Spencer and his wives. I love the instructors because they teach skiing and fun. They have a love of the game and know when to call it

quits and go in for Lego time and hot chocolate.

 

There. I feel a bit better.

 

So....if a child cannot yet run up the stairs without holding the rail, they lack the proprioception to actually ski.

Anything before that is akin to tossing drunken goats into a pool. Call it what you want, but it isn't "competitive swimming".

The goats may very well like it. When sober, they may develop a taste for that Sports Illustrated with Phelps on the cover. Delicious!

They may peer into the window to watch the summer Olympics. All well and good! They still aren't "swimming".

 

But those same-age-as-Darling kids over there who are having a blast with M.A. or J.Lynn in ski school will be skiing way before your kid is.

 

Of course there are preternaturally gifted kids. They are only slightly more common than prodigy level musicians.

Of course there are some parents who are awesome instructors. But think long and hard about how you're teaching your kid to ski.

 

Then watch quality professional instructors. Do what they do. Better yet, let them do it and you go ski.

 

And if you see Spencer, Maddy or Hunter Leigh in the lodge, spill some vegetarian chili down the back of their $750 Arc's

for me. The gods of karma will thank you for your help.

 

Herein endeth my crabbiness.

 

Cheers!

 

@

post #19 of 26

wow, you're kinda' like May West and Gilda Radner wrapped into one. nice.

 

BWPA said the most damning thing about leashing. that should pretty much end it. slope too steep.

 

or I could hear people say that they have to go down the mountain run to go home and it's steeper, or that the terrain they have doesn't offer the appropriate angle slope.

 

that's why good conditions and the perfect slope are so important with the little guys. That's the part the parent can put in place.

 

I've seen people on the mountain run, following their kids, watch in horror as their 5 year old just keeps accelerating onto the steep part of the hill in front of them. That's dangerous to the kid no matter the parent's reason for it. If you're not a good enough skier/instructor to prevent that, you have no option but to put him in a class.

 

 

 

But Allison, tell me, what did you think of those two films of 3 year olds. unbelievable. the one on this page, the thing is, someone gets in her way and she makes a very assertive and purposeful turn around him, clearly in command of her edges. really cute stuff.

post #20 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

wow, you're kinda' like May West and Gilda Radner wrapped into one. nice.

 

BWPA said the most damning thing about leashing. that should pretty much end it. slope too steep.

 

or I could hear people say that they have to go down the mountain run to go home and it's steeper, or that the terrain they have doesn't offer the appropriate angle slope.

 

that's why good conditions and the perfect slope are so important with the little guys. That's the part the parent can put in place.

 

I've seen people on the mountain run, following their kids, watch in horror as their 5 year old just keeps accelerating onto the steep part of the hill in front of them. That's dangerous to the kid no matter the parent's reason for it. If you're not a good enough skier/instructor to prevent that, you have no option but to put him in a class.

 

 

 

But Allison, tell me, what did you think of those two films of 3 year olds. unbelievable. the one on this page, the thing is, someone gets in her way and she makes a very assertive and purposeful turn around him, clearly in command of her edges. really cute stuff.


 

I see people leashing kids all the time here on stuff that isnt our easiest runs. they probaly say the same thing.

post #21 of 26

Jeff,

 

My younger son was going up the chair before 3.  Some ideas:

 

1) Edgie Wedgies.  These devices that connect the skis are controversial by some that post on EPICSKI, but they worked for the little guy until his legs were stronger.  At least he was skiing while most kids were still sitting in day care pooping in their pants.

 

2) Day care with an hour of "Magic Carpet" per day seemed to be perfect, at least for him.   Some resorts have such a program, with an instructor taking the little kids on the mountain to see what they can do (walking with skis, trying the Magic Carpet, etc.).   One day our little guy said he was the only kid sitting on the bench instead of standing on the Magic Carpet.  Later we figured out the "bench" was the chairlift on the beginners hill.  Needless to say I brought a camera to film him the next day (and gave a generous tip to his instructor).

 

3) The harness mentioned in above posts is great for helping the little ones onto the chairlift.  I viewed it as a safety device and used it as such, not as a ski trainer.  Some resorts have low chairlifts that make it easy to the little kids to sit on.  Some resorts do not.  Some lift operators will always slow a lift for a tiny skiers (like at the Canyons).  Other resorts have lift attendants who seem to be constantly oblivious to the needs of children.  The harness helps the little ones on relatively high seating and fast chair lifts.

 

4) Little legs tire easily.  Keep your child on the snow for a short time and make sure she quits before getting cold or tired.  The idea is to get the little ones wanting to come back for more.  If your daughter is mad at you for quitting too soon, that is a good thing.  A couple of runs down the hill may be all she can handle.

 

5) Both my kids were in the back seat until they were five.  So what?  Some little kids aren't strong enough for proper balance until they are a bit older.  When they are strong enough to get forward, they will get in balance.

 

6)  Kids that young don't know what a helmet or goggle is supposed to feel like.  They don't know that snow isn't supposed to go into their gloves.  Keep asking them questions and make sure they are comfortable.  At that age the idea is to have fun...and more fun.

 

7)  I know this will upset some instructors, but the older ones were far superior with my kids than the younger ones.  Why?  I am not sure.  Perhaps the guys and gals with lots of gray hair figured out how to make things simple and (therefore) fun for the kids.

 

8)  I wrote a post once about saving money while skiing with little kids.  There is a ton of good used equipment out there.  Buying used equipment is cheaper than renting.  Take care of your equipment and  it should be in much better condition  than what is used for rentals at many ski hills (I tune and wax the family skis).  As with adults, good fitting boots is paramount.  Boots for your daughter's age are built for comfort and warmth.

 

9) Finding good mittens for little kids is a pain.  Most are too flimsy or not warm enough.  Just spend the money for quality mittens and be glad you did.  You can by great mittens (like HESTRA) in the off season for at least 50% off.  I'd stock up when the price is right so you are ready as she grows.

 

10)  If she isn't ready to ski yet (leg strength or whatever) don't worry.  There is always next year.   

 

11)  Safety first!  Keep reminding the little ones to "look uphill" before they start, etc.  Always ski behind them once they are skiing (too many idiots out there). 

 

12)  If she has the balance and is skiing by 4, consider martial arts in the off season.  Martial arts is the absolute nuts for cross training at any age.  Most martial arts schools will teach kids (that will listen) at 4 or 5 years old.  Her additional strength and flexibility will have her skiing black diamonds in a few years, well ahead of most peers.

 

13)  Once your kid grows and calls you a wimp for not skiing a bump run non-stop, remember how cute she looked when she began to ski.  It will ease the pain.

 


Edited by quant2325 - 1/1/12 at 8:25pm
post #22 of 26

why do I doubt that?   th_dunno-1[1].gif   roflmao.gif
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Allison Matura View Post

snip...

 

 

Herein endeth my crabbiness.

 

Cheers!

 

@



 

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

Jeff,

 

My younger son was going up the chair before 3.  Some ideas:

 

1) Edgie Wedgies.  These devices that connect the skis are controversial by some that post on EPICSKI, but they worked for the little guy until his legs were stronger.  At least he was skiing while most kids were still sitting in day care pooping in their pants.

 

2) Day care with an hour of "Magic Carpet" per day seemed to be perfect, at least for him.   Some resorts have such a program, with an instructor taking the little kids on the mountain to see what they can do (walking with skis, trying the Magic Carpet, etc.).   One day our little guy said he was the only kid sitting on the bench instead of standing on the Magic Carpet.  Later we figured out the "bench" was the chairlift on the beginners hill.  Needless to say I brought a camera to film him the next day (and gave a generous tip to his instructor).

 

3) The harness mentioned in above posts is great for helping the little ones onto the chairlift.  I viewed it as a safety device and used it as such, not as a ski trainer.  Some resorts have low chairlifts that make it easy to the little kids to sit on.  Some resorts do not.  Some lift operators will always slow a lift for a tiny skiers (like at the Canyons).  Other resorts have lift attendants who seem to be constantly oblivious to the needs of children.  The harness helps the little ones on relatively high seating and fast chair lifts.

 

4) Little legs tire easily.  Keep your child on the snow for a short time and make sure she quits before getting cold or tired.  The idea is to get the little ones wanting to come back for more.  If your daughter is mad at you for quitting too soon, that is a good thing.  A couple of runs down the hill may be all she can handle.

 

5) Both my kids were in the back seat until they were five.  So what?  Some little kids aren't strong enough for proper balance until they are a bit older.  When they are strong enough to get forward, they will get in balance.

 

6)  Kids that young don't know what a helmet or goggle is supposed to feel like.  They don't know that snow isn't supposed to go into their gloves.  Keep asking them questions and make sure they are comfortable.  At that age the idea is to have fun...and more fun.

 

7)  I know this will upset some instructors, but the older ones were far superior with my kids than the younger ones.  Why?  I am not sure.  Perhaps the guys and gals with lots of gray hair figured out how to make things simple and (therefore) fun for the kids.

 

8)  I wrote a post once about saving money while skiing with little kids.  There is a ton of good used equipment out there.  Buying used equipment is cheaper than renting.  Take care of your equipment and  it should be in much better condition  than what is used for rentals at many ski hills (I tune and wax the family skis).  As with adults, good fitting boots is paramount.  Boots for your daughter's age are built for comfort and warmth.

 

9) Finding good mittens for little kids is a pain.  Most are too flimsy or not warm enough.  Just spend the money for quality mittens and be glad you did.  You can by great mittens (like HESTRA) in the off season for at least 50% off.  I'd stock up when the price is right so you are ready as she grows.

 

10)  If she isn't ready to ski yet (leg strength or whatever) don't worry.  There is always next year.   

 

11)  Safety first!  Keep reminding the little ones to "look uphill" before they start, etc.  Always ski behind them once they are skiing (too many idiots out there). 

 

12)  If she has the balance and is skiing by 4, consider martial arts in the off season.  Martial arts is the absolute nuts for cross training at any age.  Most martial arts schools will teach kids (that will listen) at 4 or 5 years old.  Her additional strength and flexibility will have her skiing black diamonds in a few years, well ahead of most peers.

 

13)  Once your kid grows and calls you a wimp for not skiing a bump run non-stop, remember how cute she looked when she began to ski.  It will ease the pain.

 


Excellent post I really like #13 but it will ease my pain  when they are grown up and they take me heli skiing, then I know I did a good jobsmile.gif

 

post #24 of 26

cal february.jpg

 

 

Hulla Hoop at 2.5, this is how we started. then to the harness but for just a few days.

 

now we are here. 1 year later

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/108542/kid-stoke

 

 

good luck. it's a wonderful journey!

 

 

post #25 of 26

Oh man, you gotta stop, un-bear-ably cute, you're killin' me. Laughing with your fun. Thanks.

 

I just noticed, he even has a narrow baffle puffy. Bet he thinks that's the kine.

 

 

Snowbowler: exactly right. I can't wait to tell my son what I just read in #13. ha. I just saw his first POV edit, and that's what I thought: I guess I taught him well. Well, I also thought: watch out for that tree! don't ski past that cliff sign! That drop is too big, no one's spotting you! 

post #26 of 26

I love Mae West and Gilda Radner was a neighbor when I lived in Stamford, so thanks for that.

 

Also, your woodwork is spectacular.

 

Them little ones are adorable. And because neither of their parents have The Bad Names,

then they are probably being taught correctly.

 

Heh.

 

Cheers.

 

@lli

 

 

"I used to be Snow White, but I drifted." ~ Mae West

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