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How to grip ski poles - Page 3

post #61 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Instructor View Post

Bullcrap!   "Ripped your thumb off" - I don't believe it. If you want to get a point across, ok.....but don't bother inventing injuries that did not happen...  I once ripped my head off when I put my skis on backwards and crashed into a donut stand......


Really? That's your first post?

post #62 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Instructor View Post

Bullcrap!   "Ripped your thumb off" - I don't believe it. If you want to get a point across, ok.....but don't bother inventing injuries that did not happen...  I once ripped my head off when I put my skis on backwards and crashed into a donut stand......

 I bet your eyes were all glazed over after that accident. It would have been prevented if you ahd been skiing twin tips. I personally like some things strapless but ski poles are not on that list.

post #63 of 71

Using the poles to self arrest is an important capability, so the only time I ski without the straps would be negotiating a specific icy no fall zone with obstacles.

 

Said this years ago, there is no tree skiing as distinct from any off piste skiing in the Sierra. The mountains have trees and you ski them along with everything else. So setting up gear for trees, or determining a grip because there are trees on the mountain makes no sense to me.

 

Personal experience about a pole plant with the classic grip. I was skiing something mild, fooled around with the pole plant, put some "music" into it, a little "rhythm" just for fun, and WHAM the pole pushed back at me and sprained the thumb, at the base. I mean, I was only dicking around for a few seconds and got punished. lesson learned.

 

Sample size for pole strap use: I ski with a group of guys, none of whom remove their straps, ever, and no one has ever hooked a basket on a tree branch, this in 10 years X 8 guys. That's a lot of "tree" laps, about 16,000 plus.

post #64 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Several people in this thread suggested keeping poles on when skiing steeps, in order to self arrest. The correct way to self arrest is to grip one pole above the basket with both hands, bring the hands under the chest and put as much weight on the tip as possible. Tough to do if you're using the straps. (Good luck successfully arresting without a lot of practice but that's another story.) Presumably the theory behind using the straps on the steeps is so you don't lose a pole, but think about it--if you fall and let go of your poles and your poles are now flailing around attached to you only by the straps, what are your chances of getting a grip on one? No straps for me, except for a long skate, and to hang the poles when I rack my skis for lunch./


 

 

wink.gif

 

FWIW, my straps have break a way clips in the handles.  Strap can suddenly be strapless whenever I want it to be..

post #65 of 71

Well DL, I have caught a pole in brush below the surface, and more than once.... Haven't skied with staps in years, and I'm not about to start. I don't want them on for tree wells either.* But how many pages and how much anger and ire can be raised about how we hold our poles? Let's see!

 

* Like many things, this is a personal preference. I don't hold others accountable to mine, nor do I think they're deficient if they do things differently.

post #66 of 71

First question should always be .. did you have your poles properly calibrated by a professional pole fitter?

post #67 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Instructor View Post

Bullcrap!   "Ripped your thumb off" - I don't believe it. If you want to get a point across, ok.....but don't bother inventing injuries that did not happen...  I once ripped my head off when I put my skis on backwards and crashed into a donut stand......

 

What post are you referencing...the one where someone FELT like they'd ripped their thumb off? 

post #68 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post





wink.gif

FWIW, my straps have break a way clips in the handles.  Strap can suddenly be strapless whenever I want it to be..

That's how I self-arrest, too.

I don't have a deathgrip on my poles when skiing so my breakaway straps are nice for the times I'm skiing and my pole catches on something in the trees. Most times, I just pull the pole back on the fly and keep on going thus preventing an unnecessary climb back for a pole. When the pole needs to stay behind the breakaway strap releases and I am not injured. Yay.
post #69 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Well DL, I have caught a pole in brush below the surface, and more than once.... Haven't skied with staps in years, and I'm not about to start. I don't want them on for tree wells either.* But how many pages and how much anger and ire can be raised about how we hold our poles? Let's see!

 

* Like many things, this is a personal preference. I don't hold others accountable to mine, nor do I think they're deficient if they do things differently.


That certainly is a different experience than mine, which is totally cool. I HAVE skied at my area for 40 years, and so I know virtually every tree and bush by name, so giving them some space may be key for my approach. The guys I ski with have been skiing with straps for even longer than I have at Squaw. Thanks for granting us some latitude. Every person has their methods and every mountain has it's own personality (and resident snow snakes).  Example: early season, low snow levels, all the small trees and bushes are visible. You ski elsewhere mostly. When a little snow covers them, I still ski the same lines I did when I was avoiding them. Later with fat coverage, skiing opens up in the areas once snaggy.  natural tactics if you can follow the snowpack through the season.

post #70 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Instructor View Post

I once ripped my head off when I put my skis on backwards and crashed into a donut stand......

 

That's hysterical! You seem to have recovered fairly well. When you put the skis on backwards, did they start racing uphill?

post #71 of 71

Holly snail poop!  Three pages on pole straps?

 

As a race coach, we are pole strap nazis - but only because blasting out of the starting gate with one pole is not particularly fast and mentally distracting.

 

Conventional strap grip should have the strap laying in your palm as several posters here have described.  Debate over.  Thumbs survive.  yaaaaaaaaay!!!

 

That said, I RARELY use pole straps except in deep powder (RARE in NE).  I do not have a big issue dropping my poles though I have one set with an extra long point that likes to stick in too deep and pulls the pole out of my hand making look like a cool guy.  (Usually happens on a long traverse just as I am getting skate-speed up to an efficient level. Du-oh!)

 

As for the "death grips" mentioned here.  I say "huh?" 

 

Pole straps on the lift?  That is a gaper move.  Stick em under your butt like the cool kids.

 

All that said, I usually grab mismatched poles out of the recycling bin at the end of the season and cut to length.  Spray paint black and decorate with some cool duct tape - racer checkerboard, leopard, carbon fiber etc.  I had two pairs of these junk poles stolen.  Enjoy and may Karma greet you in a tree well.

 

I WISH I could find some of the  plastic molded handle poles.  You can just hang these on the safety bar. :)

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