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Went skiing for the first time today.

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

After months of anticipation and horrible weather, I finally got to go out for my first time ever skiing.

 

First of all I should mention that the conditions were absolutely terrible.  I think it was about as bad as you can get and still have the resort open.  The ski area had been getting a dusting of snow followed by a day of rain for a week or so, and they had been pumping out man made snow.  So I was skiing on the bunny hill, but it was just complete ice.  I don't know the names for the different types of snow, but it was so hard packed that when you went down your skis didn't actually make a new trail in the "snow", it just shifted around a little bit of loose (really wet and heavy) ice/snow stuff on top of really hard packed ice/snow.

 

So despite all that I had a pretty good outing.  I payed for a group lesson but was the only one there for a lesson so I got a private lesson for $20.  After 5 minutes of getting used to the skis at the bottom of the hill, the instructor said I was ready to go up to the top.  So we did the bunny hill for the entire lesson, mostly working on linking turns, which was not difficult at all.  My instructor said she wasn't trying to teach me too much about how to wedge because I seemed to be pretty good already (I'm pretty naturally athletic and coordinated).  I was getting my skis parallel during the portion of my turn that was across the slope, and keeping a wedge during the actual turn.  I feel like I am very comfortable with this style of skiing now, and I am definitely ready to move on to parallel skiing.

 

Here was my major problem: my uphill ski.  I swear I felt like most of the time having an uphill ski was a hindrance rather than a help.  I think a lot of it had to do with the type of "snow" I was skiing in, but I could not get my uphill ski to be parallel and skid like my downhill ski.  Most of my pressure was on the downhill ski, while the uphill ski was kind of just resting on the ground along for the ride, pretty much uncontrolled.  When I tried to move the front tip out of a wedge and into a parallel position, the edge just caught the snow and was like "lol nope".  I felt like no matter how hard I twisted my foot I couldn't get my uphill ski under control and parallel.  There were two ways I was trying to turn the ski to make it parallel; swinging the front tip out, or swinging the back tip in.  If I did the former, the outside edge would catch.  If I did the latter, my skis would start to separate and the back tips would start to cross, or they would get really close and I would be on my edges and be out of control.

 

The other problem I had was my stance.  I could not for the life of me figure out how I was supposed to be standing.  I know that I was supposed to be feeling pressure on my shins from my boots.  I did this by leaning forward.  But my instructor said I was sticking my butt out too far when I leaned forward like this.  But if I stood up straight and leaned forward to feel pressure on my shins, all my weight was centered close to the ball of my foot, and it just felt unnatural.  It was either keep my mass centered and be hunched over too much, or stand up straighter and have a weird center of gravity.  Sitting here now typing this I'm wondering why I couldn't just center my weight correctly, but on the slope it was much easier said than done.

 

So that is it.  I can't wait until I get some REAL snow to go out again.  It actually starting raining (well, it was more like a fine mist in the air) towards the end of the night.  I only stayed out there for 2 hours, one hour of that being a lesson, because I felt like I couldn't learn anything more on that snow.

 

I tried to thoroughly describe the way I perceived my problems above, because I feel like the more I describe it, the more you can guide me.  Any advice is appreciated.

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 27

Sounds like you had fun and that is the most important thing about skiing.

 

I have taught quite a few beginner lessons the past couple years and it sounds like you are having the common beginner problems so dont be discourage.  Your up hill ski (I'm assuming you mean the one that is uphill at the end of your turn) is a tricky little bugger to learn what to do with.  You say you tried pushing the tip out and pulling the tail in, did you try doing them both at the same time?  Pretend you have a pole going through the center of the top of your foot and out the bottom. Rotate your foot around this pole.  Practice that in just boots first.  If you do it in the snow you should have a little bowtie shape left in the snow when you move your foot.  Your toes and heel should move equal amounts at the same time.  To be able to do this you have to be in a good stance. Having your weight on the balls of your feet is a good thing.  To get the pressure between your boot and shins, its all about the ankles.  Get in a good balanced stance (think of a soccer goalie or someone waiting to receive a serve in tennis) then flex only your ankles.

 

Try these tips out. If it feels weird at first thats normal, you are just now trying something new. Once you find that good stance and have a little more control over turning that foot, you will naturally start finishing your turns parallel. Be patient and have fun!

post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 

Yeah I did have a lot of fun, I can't wait to get out there again.

 

I didn't realize that being on the balls of your feet was a good thing, that is helpful.

 

I did try to rotate both at the same time, but it felt like I was throwing my ski around in a really quick turn instead of a nice long smooth turn.  I think I need to be letting the shape of the ski guide my turn more, but it didn't want to cooperate.  I will try visualizing what you described next time though.

post #4 of 27

Dont over think it,   your doing the right thing starting with lessons dont risk getting confused with to much head junk!

 

plenty of learning to do before your are really parallel, but first part of the learning curve is quick to execute with lessons and working on the drills you are given.

 

and free ski just let it go for a few runs and get the feeling of fun gliding not overly thinking technique.  (in control of course)

 

Richo

post #5 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Levi101288 View Post
To get the pressure between your boot and shins, its all about the ankles.  Get in a good balanced stance (think of a soccer goalie or someone waiting to receive a serve in tennis) then flex only your ankles.

That's the key. Once you're ankles are flexed, things will begin to happen. You want to pressure forward not "lean". Knees bent, ankles bent, body almost upright (and the rest). At this point, the more pressure you can get on the shins, the better you're going to be.

 

Don't focus too much on your feet. It'll just confuse and distract you when you're skiing. That is pretty advanced stuff for a beginner.
 

 

post #6 of 27

Ykes!  slow down.

 

You do not want to have the weight on the balls of your feet.  Stand on your foot.

 

You do not want to have pressure on your shins.  You should be neutral or more upright.

 

You need to take another lesson.  It would really help.  Get a recommendation for a certified instructor.  What mountain are you skiing?

 

I am not an instructor, but hopefully we can hear from those who are.

post #7 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post

That's the key. Once you're ankles are flexed, things will begin to happen. You want to pressure forward not "lean". Knees bent, ankles bent, body almost upright (and the rest). At this point, the more pressure you can get on the shins, the better you're going to be.

 

Don't focus too much on your feet. It'll just confuse and distract you when you're skiing. That is pretty advanced stuff for a beginner.
 

 


I emphatically disagree with just about everything said here.  Taking two points in particular:

  • The more pressure you get on your shins, the less pressure you'll have on your ski tails.  This leads to "turns" that simply involve letting the tails slide back-and-forth.  This will work to a certain degree, but it is very limiting.  I strive for fairly equal pressure distribution across my foot, but effectively, you want a pressure distribution on your foot that allows the whole ski to turn.  Next time you're on snow, lean hard into the front of your boots and try "turning" your ski (just standing on flat snow at the base).  The tip will stay put and the tails will slide.  Then lead back hard and try turning; you should find the opposite occurring (i.e., the tips will swing and the tails will stay put).  As mentioned above, you want the whole ski to move; i.e., as the tips move, the tails move.  As you get on a slope and start picking up speed, you will find that you have to constantly flex your ankles in order to keep that pressure distribution constant.  That is, maintaining constant ski pressure distribution involves constant moving on your part.
  • As for focusing on your feet.  Skiing starts there.  Focusing higher up (i.e., knees, hips, shoulders, etc.) leads to very gross movements that are likely to overpower your skis.  It is very possible to turn your hips, or push your knees around, or turn your shoulders and not have your skis move at all.  It is not possible to turn your feet without having your skis move.

 

 

post #8 of 27

It just like walking! Stay balanced and look where you going.ski.gif

post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 

So... should I feel like I am actively leaning down the hill?  Sorry, this all seems so simple in theory but when I get on an incline my stance and center of gravity is much harder to figure out.

post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 

(not sure why I can't edit my post)

 

I'm not sure if I'm just out of shape for skiing or if generally feeling the burn just being in my regular stance means I'm doing it wrong.  Should I be more relaxed?

post #11 of 27


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post


I emphatically disagree with just about everything said here.  Taking two points in particular:

  • The more pressure you get on your shins, the less pressure you'll have on your ski tails.  This leads to "turns" that simply involve letting the tails slide back-and-forth.  This will work to a certain degree, but it is very limiting.  I strive for fairly equal pressure distribution across my foot, but effectively, you want a pressure distribution on your foot that allows the whole ski to turn.  Next time you're on snow, lean hard into the front of your boots and try "turning" your ski (just standing on flat snow at the base).  The tip will stay put and the tails will slide.  Then lead back hard and try turning; you should find the opposite occurring (i.e., the tips will swing and the tails will stay put).  As mentioned above, you want the whole ski to move; i.e., as the tips move, the tails move.  As you get on a slope and start picking up speed, you will find that you have to constantly flex your ankles in order to keep that pressure distribution constant.  That is, maintaining constant ski pressure distribution involves constant moving on your part.
  • As for focusing on your feet.  Skiing starts there.  Focusing higher up (i.e., knees, hips, shoulders, etc.) leads to very gross movements that are likely to overpower your skis.  It is very possible to turn your hips, or push your knees around, or turn your shoulders and not have your skis move at all.  It is not possible to turn your feet without having your skis move.

 

 

I've been out of instruction for a long while now (say 6-7 years) so maybe what I said was outdated from a PSIA viewpoint. I taught mostly greens to blues back then so I definitely don't qualify to counter with certainty at any level. FWIW, I do observe that USSA coaches do still use similar techniques to lower level racers as I described. And, so do other ski schools as I saw it 3 years or so ago.

For me, Kevin, what you have described is very good stuff? But, IMHO it's effective only for the more advanced. Skiing by feet sensation (unless you're only talking about the toes) is very hard to execute for a beginner.  We used to do at clinics and I can say not everyone was comfortable with that concept (we're not just talking about pointing our toes here).

To teach anyone at the OP's level, I prefer the simpler the drill the better. KISS. If the OP is focusing on his feet to the extent as you have described, where do you think his hands and butt are going to be? Remember, at this time, the chances are he's still adapting to the hill and the movement on snow. He's likely not thinking about how to refine his skills while he's moving. The upright body will help him center while exerting pressure on the shins. It also alleviates over-pressuring the tips as he can only push so hard in that position. If he's not perfectly centered, so what if he skids a little as long as his stance is good (although flailing is bad). I don't think it's realistic to expect perfect carved turns at this time.

post #12 of 27

Stay off the shins.  It's one thing that I have learned over the years here at EPIC.  That's not to say that I am good at it.  But teaching someone to pressure the shin is teaching bad habits IMHO.

 

I wish we could get a few of the more qualified instructors to chime in.

 

When I ski a do use the shin, but it's quick and brief and my goal is to stay centered.

post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 

Ok, well I went skiing for the second time yesterday and I feel a lot better about where I am now.  The conditions got upgraded from "man made ice" to "man made slush", which was a big improvement.  I'm less concerned about my stance now, and I think I am standing better (at least it felt better).  I really just needed to get out and ski some more.  Two hours on ice was not enough to really teach me what I needed to learn.

 

This time like I said, it was slush, and an hour in it started to pour rain on us.  So I only got to do a ~3 hours total, but it was enough to boost my confidence.  I was skiing mostly parallel by the end.  Now we are finally getting some snow dumped on us so tomorrow I am going to be going out and buying a lesson to ski on some fresh, non man-made snow for the first time.

 

One thing I know I need to work on is my movement during turns.  I know that they should be smoother "S" shapes, while I feel like my body is moving around too much and my "S" is too jagged.  This is something that I know will get better with another lesson. 

 

I also tend to lean back sometimes when I start to go too fast, which makes me very unsteady.  But I recognize this and am working on it.  I also like to go kind of fast.  I went with my girlfriend who skis and she said she was having trouble keeping up with me at some points.  It's weird; I feel almost out of control, but at the same time like I am not in danger of crossing the line from in control to out of control.  The faster I go (to a point) the easier it seems to be to ski parallel and keep a good turn shape.

 

The big breakthrough came with adjusting my stance and putting more weight on the downhill ski.  Before I was trying to do a 60/40 type situation, but it really is closer to 80/20.  Taking some of the weight off the uphill ski makes it a lot easier to let it fall into line parallel with the other ski. 

 

Overall I think I am doing quite well for the conditions I have been faced with.  First time out was a lesson and two hours on ice.  Second time was two weeks later, teaching myself, and I got from a wedge to basically (very sloppy) parallel skiing on slush.  Both times was skiing in the rain on man made crap.  I think from here on out lessons will become even more productive as I get into actually learning how to parallel ski and move away from super beginner stuff.

 

I'll update again tomorrow after I get home.

post #14 of 27

 

Quote:
Two hours on ice was not enough to really teach me what I needed to learn.

 

I've been skiing for ~20 years now, and I still get an education every time I encounter ice.  Not meant to be depressing; more to realize that your skiing will be constantly evolving as you learn (either through mileage or through lessons).

 

 

Quote:
I also tend to lean back sometimes when I start to go too fast

 

Most people do this.  Get going "too fast" and some form of survival instinct starts to kick in.  I know my skiing technique is pretty much gone when I hit my "too fast" threshold.  The key is to realize that it's happening (i.e., "too fast" and "good technique" are rarely used in the same sentence).  Your speed threshold will increase with mileage.

 

 

Quote:
I also like to go kind of fast

 

This is a common sentiment.  Be aware though that many people say this because they can't ski slowly.  Speed makes things easier (to a point), but it can also hide a lot of technique flaws.

 

 

Quote:
Both times was skiing in the rain on man made crap

 

As has been said around here many times, there are only two kinds of conditions:  "good" and "good for you".  You've had two days of "good for you".  Don't discount how "good for you" the "good for you" days can be; the mountain is the best teacher there is.

 

post #15 of 27

Logic,

 

"Tony Knows How to Ski" or "Toe Knee Nose = how to ski"

 

Use a vertical line from your toes to your knees to your nose as a reference line for where you want to be "on average". To get into this position you need an appropriate blend of ankle, knee and hip bending. If you bend in a joint too much or too little, "symptoms" will appear. For example if you are bending your hips too much this will cause your butt to stick out. To fix that you need to bend your hips less (stand taller) and bend your knees and ankles more (aka Bend Zee Knees - Five Dollars please!).

 

Standing in ski boots, there should be some shin contact with the front of the boot. Efficient skiing involves moving "forward" at some points in the turn to increase shin contact and "backwards" at other points in the turn to reduce shin contact. That's one of the things I meant by where you want to be "on average". There should be a lot of body parts moving in a ski turn. A balanced position is a result of a specific blend of hip, knee and ankle flex. When you are standing still, if you change the flex of one joint without changing at least one other joint, you will get "out of balance" or "out of center" (e.g. feeling the weight over the balls of your feet instead of your arches). When you start moving, the acceleration creates an out of balance condition. You can either move one joint a lot to compensate or all three joints a little. It's a lot easier to think about (and learn to adjust by) moving one joint, but with experience it can be become automatic to move all three joints without thinking. In skiing, we are constantly speeding up and slowing down but we use turns to make the average speed down the hill a constant. It's very hard to get bending of only one joint to match these changes in speed. Even if you could, it would be a lot of work.  But it's also hard to consciously move all three joints simultaneously and match the change in acceleration. This is why we start skiing on the bunny hill and do it very slowly. With practice, the movements can be made unconsciously, you get better and can increase the speed and increase the steepness.

 

If you start skiing with my friend "Tony", that uphill ski will start to behave and you'll be able to think about where you want to go instead of how you are standing.

 

post #16 of 27
Thread Starter 

Ok, another update.  I went last night, and it was indeed real snow for once.  The only problem was that it was night time and they were making snow as well.  So at some points I was skiing into man made whiteouts which was scary to me.  But overall I liked the snow and had a lot of fun.  I took another lesson but it wasn't very helpful.  They put me in the "level 2" lesson which a bunch of little kids also got added to and it ended up with the little kids getting all the attention and we stayed on the bunny hill which was BORING.  Next time I would definitely say something if this happens again. 

 

Then I went up on my first real run ever.  The green I had done before was at  small resort and it took like 20 seconds to ski down.  Now finally I got on a 1 mile green run.  What I took away from it is that I think I'm doing something wrong because it was exhausting.  My legs were burning so much by time I got to the bottom. 

 

I still have some problems staying completely parallel.  Especially in the point of the turn where I am switching directions from across the hill to down the hill.  Many times, my skis would get too close together and almost cross or the uphill ski would catch an edge and almost make me fall (because the downhill ski was skidding at the uphill ski was just zooming downhill more quickly on an edge).

 

I just need to practice a lot more.  And take another lesson where we are doing actual runs so they can tell me if I am doing something that would make skiing seem so exhausting.

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Ok, another update.  I went last night, and it was indeed real snow for once.  The only problem was that it was night time and they were making snow as well.  So at some points I was skiing into man made whiteouts which was scary to me.  But overall I liked the snow and had a lot of fun.  I took another lesson but it wasn't very helpful.  They put me in the "level 2" lesson which a bunch of little kids also got added to and it ended up with the little kids getting all the attention and we stayed on the bunny hill which was BORING.  Next time I would definitely say something if this happens again. 

 

Then I went up on my first real run ever.  The green I had done before was at  small resort and it took like 20 seconds to ski down.  Now finally I got on a 1 mile green run.  What I took away from it is that I think I'm doing something wrong because it was exhausting.  My legs were burning so much by time I got to the bottom. 

 

I still have some problems staying completely parallel.  Especially in the point of the turn where I am switching directions from across the hill to down the hill.  Many times, my skis would get too close together and almost cross or the uphill ski would catch an edge and almost make me fall (because the downhill ski was skidding at the uphill ski was just zooming downhill more quickly on an edge).

 

I just need to practice a lot more.  And take another lesson where we are doing actual runs so they can tell me if I am doing something that would make skiing seem so exhausting.


It's impossible to tell "for sure" without seeing a video, but your complaints about your legs burning and having difficulty in keeping your skis parallel throughout the turn make it sound like you're trying to ski by pushing your outside ski out (like an outrigger), match the other ski to be parallel to it, and complete the turn in that fashion.  But like I said, that's just a guess.

 

Can your girlfriend join you next time and take a camera along?  Most cameras have some sort of video option.  Post it up somewhere (i.e., YouTube) and let the crowd here give you some feedback?

post #18 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post


It's impossible to tell "for sure" without seeing a video, but your complaints about your legs burning and having difficulty in keeping your skis parallel throughout the turn make it sound like you're trying to ski by pushing your outside ski out (like an outrigger), match the other ski to be parallel to it, and complete the turn in that fashion.  But like I said, that's just a guess.

 

Can your girlfriend join you next time and take a camera along?  Most cameras have some sort of video option.  Post it up somewhere (i.e., YouTube) and let the crowd here give you some feedback?



Yeah this sort of sounds like what I do.  What should I be doing instead?

 

My GF won't be in town for a couple more weeks but I'll see if I can get a camera when she gets back.

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post



Yeah this sort of sounds like what I do.  What should I be doing instead?



Read this:  http://www.epicski.com/t/8328/how-do-you-make-a-perfect-turn#post_97925

 

:)

 

post #20 of 27

LogicX,

 

If your quads are burning, you are most likely holding a squat as you ski.  Stand up taller to relieve those quads.  Practice what Bob Barnes describes in that perfect turn post, but do it standing taller.  

 

Work on standing tall on the most boring beginner terrain at first so you won't have to worry about speed.  Move your hips up and forward.  This can feel very insecure at first; thus the beginner terrain.  The magic trick to making this work will involve bending your ankles forward inside your boots.  The smallest little forward bend of the ankles will help a LOT.  

 

Once you are comfortable skiing taller on the beginner slope, you can take it to the mile long run to work on those turns without the quad stress.  

 

 

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 

Went again today.  Really focused on my turns and everything feels like it is coming together.  I tried to really focus on the advice in Bob's article.  I kept repeating "offensive!" in my head or "drive with the tips!"  I still have a lot to work on but the "offensive" mentality is helping.

 

Something else that really helped me was trying to make sure my chest and body was a little more steady and pointed more downhill at all times.  And I worked on standing up a little straighter as well.  I think the combination of standing up and less body movement helped a lot.  Also, not relying solely on the skid portion of my turn to slow made my legs burn less because it meant I didn't have to really dig my legs into the ground to slow myself down.  I tried to think of the turn as not being my only source of speed control.  Although by the end of 4 hours straight my legs were burning, but it felt more like general fatigue than a technique problem.

 

I still have some wobble every now and then in my turns, especially when I accidentally start skiing in the back seat.  So I still crossed my tips a couple times which is always scary.  But realizing that my stance was too narrow at some points and trying to widen it a bit is helping with that.

 

I think at this point I think I am a solid intermediate.  I ski parallel pretty much all the time, however sloppy it may be to some of the pros here.  I went down a blue run and it wasn't too bad.  I didn't have to snowplow or anything, but I still have trouble controlling my speed in steep sections without reverting to an uglier, more "Z" shaped turn.  Honestly, going fast on a blue is less tiring than going slow on a green.  I just need to figure out how to not be out of control in steep sections.

 

Thanks for the advice everyone.

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

 

I think at this point I think I am a solid intermediate. 



wooo down tiger,   Ive been sking over 20 years and think carefully at the question asked before making a claim of solid imtermediate.

 

Its great you are enjoying your sking thats what its all about for you, me and most of us, we arent trying to make a living out of it..  Sounds like the tips you are getting are also helping.

 

Heres one to help you keep your feet on the ground and understand there is a long road of learning and enjoyment ahead.

 We all have to walk and jog a bit before we start telling Carl Lewis we can run fast!  Right now I'm guessing your at an adventerous crawl, which is just as exiting as any part of the learning curve once your hooked.ski.gif

 

 

Richo

 

 

 

 

post #23 of 27

Funny how a skiers ability level changes with conditions and terrain.  Get on a steep Icy face and there goes your confidence.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richo View Post



wooo down tiger,   Ive been sking over 20 years and think carefully at the question asked before making a claim of solid imtermediate.

 

Its great you are enjoying your sking thats what its all about for you, me and most of us, we arent trying to make a living out of it..  Sounds like the tips you are getting are also helping.

 

Heres one to help you keep your feet on the ground and understand there is a long road of learning and enjoyment ahead.

 We all have to walk and jog a bit before we start telling Carl Lewis we can run fast!  Right now I'm guessing your at an adventerous crawl, which is just as exiting as any part of the learning curve once your hooked.ski.gif

 

 

Richo

 

 

 

 



 

post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post

Stay off the shins.  It's one thing that I have learned over the years here at EPIC.  That's not to say that I am good at it.  But teaching someone to pressure the shin is teaching bad habits IMHO.

 

I wish we could get a few of the more qualified instructors to chime in.

 

When I ski a do use the shin, but it's quick and brief and my goal is to stay centered.



Funny thing.... my wife and I are talking last week ( Both certified CSIA, I'm dirt but she is good). What we chatted about on the chair was what we hear and understand as we are told, we can both be on session and come away with understanding it differently. Please do not get confused by all the input you get here (it is hard to understand the terminology and the expectations with very little to base it on.) I think you should continue with what you are doing and take another lesson in the near future is a great answer.

I am not trying to say that the folks here arn't telling you things that will help , I am saying I would find it hard to understand what I was reading when I am so new at the sport.

I have been working on an item with my skiing for a few years and although everyone said I was doing it correctly I was not ( I just made it look right). UL said a simple thing to me last year and all of a sudden it made sense. Then people said yes that's what we said.. not to me they didn't.

All I am saying is don't try to get too much from reading here until you have a little more experience under your belt.

 

For sure have fun and carry on with what you are doing.

 

post #25 of 27
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
Stay off the shins.  It's one thing that I have learned over the years here at EPIC.  That's not to say that I am good at it.  But teaching someone to pressure the shin is teaching bad habits IMHO.

I wish we could get a few of the more qualified instructors to chime in.

When I ski a do use the shin, but it's quick and brief and my goal is to stay centered.



LogicX,

People disagree about this shin-tongue thing.  It all depends.  Trial and error will tell you what works for you.  Get to where you can do both, skiing with shin pressure, and skiing without it.  In both situatitons, keep your butt up, don't drop it and sit half way down.  Then you decide what is working best for your physiology and boot/binding/ski set-up.

post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 

Ok I'll hold off on any level classifications for a while biggrin.gif.  I was just going by this http://skiing.about.com/od/downhillskiing/a/abilitylevels.htm where I seem to be a level 5 but even I thought that this list made the jump to intermediate rather quickly.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richo View Post



wooo down tiger,   Ive been sking over 20 years and think carefully at the question asked before making a claim of solid imtermediate.

 

Its great you are enjoying your sking thats what its all about for you, me and most of us, we arent trying to make a living out of it..  Sounds like the tips you are getting are also helping.

 

Heres one to help you keep your feet on the ground and understand there is a long road of learning and enjoyment ahead.

 We all have to walk and jog a bit before we start telling Carl Lewis we can run fast!  Right now I'm guessing your at an adventerous crawl, which is just as exiting as any part of the learning curve once your hooked.ski.gif

 

 

Richo

 

 

 

 



 

post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by LogicX View Post

Ok I'll hold off on any level classifications for a while biggrin.gif.  I was just going by this http://skiing.about.com/od/downhillskiing/a/abilitylevels.htm where I seem to be a level 5 but even I thought that this list made the jump to intermediate rather quickly.
 



 


Ah yes, the infamous "ski levels" grouping.  There has been some endless discussion on here regarding the skier levels.  The skier levels chart that you reference was designed to separate skiers into similar ability levels for the purposes of ski school group lessons.  i.e., you can say you're a level 5, other people will say they're level 5 (or 6, or 3 or whatever), and it provides some initial method of grouping skiers into like abilities.

 

The skier levels do allow for a fairly rapid progression through the initial levels, as the vast majority of ski school lessons are for the beginning / lower intermediate skier, so those groups get some extra refinement in the initial splits created by the "skier level" chart.  The jumps between the upper levels on the chart get bigger and bigger and take more and more time (and devotion on the student's part) to overcome.

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