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CSIA Level 2 Ski Suggestions

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I completed my CSIA level 1 this past March and am working toward my level 2 in the next year. I am presently skiing on an all mountian ski but it was suggested that I acquire an on piste ski for my level two. I have been looking at the head magnum but do not want to spend $800.00 at this time if it is not necessary.

 

 I was wondering if anyone had any comments or a suggestion regarding a brand and model that I should be looking at.
 

post #2 of 17

When I did my Level 2 there were a couple of guys skiing on twin tips so I guess with a waist around 80 to 85 as it was afew years ago. The majority of people skied real frontside skis with 65 to 72 waist. I bought some Fischer RX8 for the job as I was concerned about my short turns being good enough. As I say this is a few years back.

 

I'm working towards my Level 3 and ski mainly on Salomon Tornados with a 79 waist. They do the job just fine and I'll present myself with something like these.

 

I wouldn't particularly mention any one ski as almost everything out there is good nowadays. The Heads are certainly a great ski but like you say it's a lot of money. I wouldn't ski too much above 80mm though. My son did his Level 3 a couple of years back and one of the guys turned up on a pair of Seths. He was told to go and change them.

 

Hope that helps!

post #3 of 17

You can pass on anything really.  But there is no question that certain skis will make that easier then others.  A narrower ski will make picking up the edge easier to do, and to learn to do if that is an area you are still working on.  However if you can tip a wide ski over and make it perform to standard there wont be an issue.  But I suspect the advice you got was given to you specifically to aid in your development of edging skills and generating ski performance.

 

Where are you located, and where are you planning on taking your exams?

post #4 of 17

Yeah it can be tough shelling out that kind of money for skis. I used the head Magnums but not only till my 4s. If you're worried that you might fail just because of your current skis, I highly doubt so. But Skidude72 is right when a smaller waist will help you develop more refined edging skills. So just depends where you are financially. Personally, if I was going to buy a ski, I would buy a good one like the Head (or many others just as good or better). If not, just stay on your current one and save up the money.

post #5 of 17

First off, have a great time on your level 2 course! It's sure to be a great experience. 

 

In my level 2, people were on anything from 68mm up to around 88mm (on a twintip). Consider the expectations for the level 2 and choose a ski that balances your ability to ski the following:

  • Terrain: green/blue/black groomers and some bumps
  • all turn shapes (small, medium, long)
  • low to moderate speeds (may be encouraged to "ski fast" at times)
  • skill demonstrations (wedge, garlands, sideslips, one foot, javelin turns, etc as decided by conductor)

 

so factor that into your ski choice. "all mountain" is such a broad banner--my all mountain ski for the course was a 70% groomer ski with a 72mm waist and 14.9m turn radius. A friend of mine used a Peak 82 to pass last season - he was a strong skier though relative to the standard. Like skidude said, it depends on your strengths and development opportunities. I'd avoid skis primarily intended for off-piste. But hey, if you can ski it to the standards required, it'll work. 

 

If you can ski to this standard on your gear, you'll pass the ski portion: 

 

 

Keep in mind these are level 4s skiing at the speed and "performance" of a level 2. If you go to a clinic/PDP session, it'd be worth asking your clinician based on your individual situation. (you probably already know this, but PDPs are free for members!)

post #6 of 17

An all mountain ski should be fine for your level 2. As Skidude and Gigatoh mention, a narrower ski will be easier to roll onto edge but is certainly not necessary. My only suggestion is to go with a ski that doesn't have too much side cut. I see a lot of people ski on a slalom or other carving skis with a tonne of shape thinking it will give them an advantage... but when a ski has that much of a self steering effect people tend to rely on it rather than develop the steering skills (ie: pivoting, edging, pressure control) that you want to demonstrate on a CSIA course. Somewhere between a 15m -19m is probably ideal.

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice. I am located in the Okanagan and hope to tackle the level two cert before the end of the season.

post #8 of 17

Okanagen eh? Best skiing is at the Silverstar for sure....

Skis - Anything that is shaped (not twin tipped), waist between 70-80, radius 14-19 and you'll be fine...

 

Good luck!

post #9 of 17

Silver Star's a great place for your level 2. I did both the 1+2 there - Robyn Beaudry did my level 1, and Janice Morgan did my level 2. Really incredible conductors, both of them.

 

Yeah, a versatile all mountain ski should be great--I wonder why you were advised to get an on-piste ski? (eg is there a development opportunity there?) It'd be worth asking that person for more insight as they're more in tune with your skiing situation than anyone here.

post #10 of 17

Here's my experience.  When I passed my L2 PSIA, there were 4 passes out of 14 candidates.  All who passed were on slalom/carver skis.  But that doesn't mean that if any of the other candidates picked a slalom ski for the day, they'd pass.  I think that if your daily driver of choice is a slalom ski, you're more likely to ski at the level to pass CSIA/PSIA level 2 (I think at that level the standards are fairly similar).

 

The saying in PSIA is that each level requires a higher level of precision in the tasks.  On the other hand, the wider skis are designed to be more forgiving, so they make it easier to get away with an error, and don't kick you back when you screw up.  This limits the feedback you get from the ski.  Slalom skis require precision - cruising is not an option.  The reward is that they constantly give you feedback on your technique.

 

 

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the advice to all the those who responded to my post. I am new to epic ski. What a great community.

post #12 of 17

I did my level 2 at Silverstar as well. Pretty sure I was skiing on an all mountain ski, although it was so 10 years ago so I don't actually remember what ski I was on. Silverstar would be a great place to do it - the conditions there are so sweet. I miss that place!

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by incognito View Post

Here's my experience.  When I passed my L2 PSIA, there were 4 passes out of 14 candidates.  All who passed were on slalom/carver skis.  But that doesn't mean that if any of the other candidates picked a slalom ski for the day, they'd pass.  I think that if your daily driver of choice is a slalom ski, you're more likely to ski at the level to pass CSIA/PSIA level 2 (I think at that level the standards are fairly similar).

 

The saying in PSIA is that each level requires a higher level of precision in the tasks.  On the other hand, the wider skis are designed to be more forgiving, so they make it easier to get away with an error, and don't kick you back when you screw up.  This limits the feedback you get from the ski.  Slalom skis require precision - cruising is not an option.  The reward is that they constantly give you feedback on your technique.

 

 


for the record I passed all me exams on twin tips.Level 1(1260) Level 2(line Chronic) and Level 3(public Enemy) on twin tips. My level 3 was taken on 85mm, 179cm, 21 meter radius with early rise before people knew what early rise was at an east coast mountain.

 

I know someone who I now work with that has tried L3 3 times including his first with me every time on short SL skis. He would be benefited greatly by learning how to ski a bigger ski in passing since he park and rides everything.

 

 

 

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post


for the record I passed all me exams on twin tips.Level 1(1260) Level 2(line Chronic) and Level 3(public Enemy) on twin tips. My level 3 was taken on 85mm, 179cm, 21 meter radius with early rise before people knew what early rise was at an east coast mountain.

 

I know someone who I now work with that has tried L3 3 times including his first with me every time on short SL skis. He would be benefited greatly by learning how to ski a bigger ski in passing since he park and rides everything.

 

 

 


The K2 Public Enemy/ Extreme is one of the most versatile, durable skis ever made.  It did everything well (including skiing switch and park/ pipe use).  And if bumps are on your CSIA lvl 2, a ski like this cannot be beat.   I always tell people looking for a very versatile, excellent ski, try to find this discontinued model on line for cheap...it's worth owning a pair.    Yeah, why wouldn't a Twin-Tip work for an exam...afraid of spraying a rooster tail on your examiners? 

 

SkiNerd, what is an all mountain ski to you?  In your very excellent Section 8 videos, it looks like you are on a 78mm waisted elan...that's practically a narrow carver these days.

 

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post

 

SkiNerd, what is an all mountain ski to you?  In your very excellent Section 8 videos, it looks like you are on a 78mm waisted elan...that's practically a narrow carver these days.

 



I switched to Rossi last season and mostly skied an Avenger 82 in 178cm (for teaching etc) which I consider to be an all mountain carver. This year I'm skiing an Experience 88 in a 186cm as my 'all mountain' do everything/teaching kind of ski.... yes getting a bit fatter every year! Technology is getting so good that wider skis are now carving well even on fairly hard snow. The 88's are really turny for a ski that wide so I decided to go a bit longer for the extra versatility. I would not hesitate to use them in an exam... at any level. You could certainly get away with wider than that for a level 2 course but it might not be optimal.

 

post #16 of 17

Here is my 2 cents: OP should rent a carving ski for the level 2 course.

post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liam View Post


Dude, really?  I hope the mods are onto this guerrilla marketing already.  

 



We are watching. If you use the alert capability we watch closer. If the thread self polices itself, then sometimes it gets messy, sometimes it works out.

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