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2012 reviews: Blizzard Magnum 8.1 and Rossignol Experience 88

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I had a chance to ski both of these today, in good (but thin) snow conditions.  Mostly lumpy groomers, a few small bumps (more of a bobsleigh course than a true bump run, damn snowboarders....), some steeper off-piste grippy snow.  

 

About me: 5 foot 9, 155lbs, solid all-mountain skier, can ski most anything reasonably well, tend to like powerful frontside skis, and less powerful, more crud oriented big-mountain skis.  Ski 30-50 days a year. Fairly athletic, technically oriented style.  

 

2012 Blizzard 8.1 Magnum: new slight rockered tip for 2012, otherwise unchanged.  81mm underfoot, skied in 172cm.  2012 Rossignol Experience 88: skied in 170cm. 88mm underfoot, no metal, a slight rocker profile (supposedly; glancing at it, it looked pretty traditional).  

 

(other skis tested this day: ON3P Vicik, Rossi Exp. 98, Elan Apex, Volkl Kendo; reviews to follow)

 

Lumpy, soft groomers: both skis were an absolute blast to ski.  It was like running a bucking-bull slalom course on these in the rough snow: I could easily work the skis, let momentum carry me out of the old turn and down the fall line, and put my feet exactly where they needed to be to keep snow contact. Very powerful skis; not demanding, but high performance. I felt the 88 hooked up a bit earlier and more powerfully than the 8.1, but the 8.1 was stronger underfoot and more at home in medium radius and larger turns at speed. The Rossi wanted to be more fall-line; it stayed locked into the shorter radius turn more, and was hardier to vary the radius.  Also, the Rossi felt more on/off, whereas the 8.1 was a bit more easily feathered and pressured.  Both were a hoot to ski in those conditions: they aren't pure carvers, but close enough for western conditions, although I would want something narrower for ice and hard snow. The shorter lengths allowed me to work on some skill stuff as well, things I hadn't been able to do with my bigger, less responsive skis, stuff like the "dolphin turn" in the cruddy groomers, really aggressively releasing and attempting to be more dynamic.  If you want to improve as a skier, you owe it to yourself to get a high-end frontside all-mountain ski to work on skill building. It will pay off later in the year when skiing a hairy, steep, cruddy chute.  Both of these fit the bill. 

 

Longer turns on smoother snow: 8.1 has the slight edge. I felt I was a bit closer to overpowering the 88 at speed.  The 8.1 held up just a bit better, and tracked well in GS turns, certainly better than the 88.  I think the 88 would have been better in that longer length, but that is not really apples to apples.

 

Edge grip: hard to say, the snow was really soft.  Logic dictates the 8.1, with metal and being narrower, will be better, but I wasn't able to verify.

 

Bumps: both were nice here.  Fairly soft flex on the 88 is key.  I liked the smoother tail on the 8.1 though on the release; again, the 88 was more on/off in feel, a bit more aggressive. The 8.1 was butter in comparison: it is a really progressively engaging and releasing ski.  I liked it a bit better here, but if I was looking to actually "carve" the bumps (instead of more of a pivot flow, that is typical) the 88 may have been better.

 

Semi-Steep off-piste.  Again, very close. The 8.1 was a little easier to engage and release, the 88 was a touch more powerful.  If the snow was funkier, I would probably take the 8.1: for easier snow, the 88 was more exciting though, so probably better for the easy to ski stuff.  

 

Overall: I really enjoyed both skis. The lengths are tough: these are great for "carvers" but are less than ideal for skiing big GS arcs at speed, especially when snow gets pushed around.  I could size up on either, and they would ski much differently.  For skill building, working on what I have been focusing on (fore-aft movements) and slower-speed drills, one-footed release drills, and the like, this is a great length.  For guys like me, the high 170's can be a bit long (depending on the ski) for learning and refining movements; the skis can run away if you aren't careful.  Both of these 2 are technical skis, and very rewarding, so if you make "good" movements, you will be rewarded with a nice feeling, powerful turn.  Blizzard was a touch more progressive tip and tail, and a bit more stable and smooth; 88 had a slightly more aggressive feel, more bite early, slightly more aggressive release and more of a pre-determined turn shape, but overall, they are similar.  Probably the best turns of the year so far came on these.  They out-performed the other skis on this day, no doubt.  


Edited by dawgcatching - 12/18/11 at 11:54am

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post #2 of 25

How did the Kendo compare to both of these. Do you think the kendo would be better for a skier planning to do most skiing on crisp cold groomers?

post #3 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnySide View Post

How did the Kendo compare to both of these. Do you think the kendo would be better for a skier planning to do most skiing on crisp cold groomers?



I'm sure Scott will have an opinion too, but my $0.02 is that the Kendo can be fairly compared to the Rossi but it is just not in the same league as the Blizzard Magnum (either 8.1 or 8.7) for the "crisp, cold groomers". The Kendo is overly stiff and under-damped so, while the grip is good, the ride is harsh and unforgiving.

 

SJ

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post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnySide View Post

How did the Kendo compare to both of these. Do you think the kendo would be better for a skier planning to do most skiing on crisp cold groomers?



I skied the Kendo on the same day, a few runs later.  As a carver, the 88 was a bit better, and the 8.1 was better yet.  The difference was in feel: the release and engagement of both the 88 and the 8.1 were more powerful, quicker, and a lot more fun. The release actually took you airborne if skied aggressively, whereas the Kendo didn't have that kind of energy.  The 8.1 had the best turn variation: it allowed me to work the ski more. The 88 was a fun carver on edge, but not quite as refined as the 8.1, and a bit more locked into a turn shape.  The Kendo is more of a long-turn ski: solid, stable, but not a lot of energy, and as SJ mentioned, underdamped. That makes it feel a little unwieldy; you need to stay on top of it, as it can be a rough ride.  It isn't really a "carver" as much as a "narrower all-mountain ski". As a carver/groomer ski, I would vastly prefer the 8.1.  I also skied the Elan Apex that day, which had the same character as the Kendo, but was smoother, and therefore a bit more fun. I could work the ski better than the Kendo, which was pretty aggressive: fun when I nailed a turn, but could get away from me in a hurry. 

 

To answer your question directly: no.  The RTM84 is the Volkl you want to go for as carver.  Kendo is a solid groomer ski, not really a carver, though. That 8.1 is as good as anything, though, check it out.  If you want some thing a little smoother, the Peak 78 or 84  from Head is also superb,  

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post #5 of 25

How do these skis compare to  Kastle MX88?

post #6 of 25

Quote:

Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post



I skied the Kendo on the same day, a few runs later.  As a carver, the 88 was a bit better, and the 8.1 was better yet.  The difference was in feel: the release and engagement of both the 88 and the 8.1 were more powerful, quicker, and a lot more fun. The release actually took you airborne if skied aggressively, whereas the Kendo didn't have that kind of energy.  The 8.1 had the best turn variation: it allowed me to work the ski more. The 88 was a fun carver on edge, but not quite as refined as the 8.1, and a bit more locked into a turn shape.  The Kendo is more of a long-turn ski: solid, stable, but not a lot of energy, and as SJ mentioned, underdamped. That makes it feel a little unwieldy; you need to stay on top of it, as it can be a rough ride.  It isn't really a "carver" as much as a "narrower all-mountain ski". As a carver/groomer ski, I would vastly prefer the 8.1.  I also skied the Elan Apex that day, which had the same character as the Kendo, but was smoother, and therefore a bit more fun. I could work the ski better than the Kendo, which was pretty aggressive: fun when I nailed a turn, but could get away from me in a hurry. 

 

To answer your question directly: no.  The RTM84 is the Volkl you want to go for as carver.  Kendo is a solid groomer ski, not really a carver, though. That 8.1 is as good as anything, though, check it out.  If you want some thing a little smoother, the Peak 78 or 84  from Head is also superb,  


Ah ok. Because I am coming from Fischer RC4's and some Fischer Progressors as well and I was looking buy something a little fatter in the 88mm range.  I really the way my progressors ski, so quick edge to edge and they grip so well..I just love them. And my problem is that even when I try or demo wider skis I still ski the same way, very agressive, short to medium turns. In the 88mm range I was looking at Rossi 88, Bushwackers, Kendo or mx88..so I guess my question is which one of these skis would be closest to my fisher progressors? I ask this because eventhough I am buying wider skis for more snow, being in the north east I know I will end up using them for cold hard packs most of the time.
 

 

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnySide View Post

Quote:


Ah ok. Because I am coming from Fischer RC4's and some Fischer Progressors as well and I was looking buy something a little fatter in the 88mm range.  I really the way my progressors ski, so quick edge to edge and they grip so well..I just love them. And my problem is that even when I try or demo wider skis I still ski the same way, very agressive, short to medium turns. In the 88mm range I was looking at Rossi 88, Bushwackers, Kendo or mx88..so I guess my question is which one of these skis would be closest to my fisher progressors? I ask this because eventhough I am buying wider skis for more snow, being in the north east I know I will end up using them for cold hard packs most of the time.
 

 

Well, you can eliminate the Bushwacker straight away. I skied today on manmade concrete (some of the hardest snow I have ever seen here: it got warm yesterday, the manmade stuff melted, and froze hard last night.  To give you an idea: my Kastle RX12's weren't even that great.  Slalom race skis would have been much better. The BW was not a good choice; hard to get the ski to bite anywhere but underfoot, and not much edge grip (no metal, pretty soft ski). It really doesn't belong in that group though: the 8.7 Magnum from Blizzard does.  I was riding up the lift with a guy demoing the Black Pearl (he was a short guy, but it is the same ski as the BW, just women's sizing) and he was saying the same thing; not much edge grip, just wanted to pivot around. Having skied that several times, I really like it when the groomers are soft (like a couple of days after a storm) and it is fun in any soft snow off-piste condition. Since you were asking about hard snow though, I would not recommend it. 

 

Among the others, the MX88 is going to be the clear hands-down winner on hard snow.  It has the best grip of any 88mm ski I have ever tried. The Experience 88 isn't bad, but without metal, you can overpower it in hard conditions.  It seems like plenty for typical western soft-snow groomers.  That ski will take more edge to really get cranking and grip well, especially in a short radius turn.  The nice thing is that you can stay on top of it: it isn't a hard ski to drive. The Kendo has grip, but likes to run, and can be a bit stiff in the tail for hard snow conditions when you are trying to stay on top of the ski.  A decent choice.  

 

Check out the Blizzard Magnum 8.7.  It is a really good choice; almost as much grip as the MX88. I don't think it is as versatile (like in bumps, it can be stiff) but as a carver, it is not quite as grippy, but has more energy, and is a very good ski. I love that ski on groomers.  A real powerhouse. 

 

The other ski I tried again today (got a cargo box full of skis right now) was the Peak 84 from Head. It actually had really good grip, and was easier to stay on top of than the RX12 in the demanding conditions.  I was skiing it in 177cm, and the tip had a lot of bite, but I was able to work the ski more than on my RX12's.  If you are looking for more of a versatile ride that is a very good carver, that Peak 84 deserves serious consideration.  FWIW, it was Realskier's ski of the year (overall). Those ratings don't mean too much, but as their tests are mostly generated by shop people at the industry shows, and revenue comes from subscriptions, I tend to put a little more stock in them than those in print publications (which rely on advertising from tested brands to pay the bills).  That Peak may be as well rounded as any ski I sell, at least at my weight (which is why I ordered some to sell).  
 

Coming off of Progressors (I know that ski well, owned both a 170 and 175, and have a P900 in 175cm due next week); you need something with metal and bite. From a pure "feel" perspective, the MX88 is easily the closest.  Similar race-stock layup and feel, dampness is quite close to the Fischer Progressor/RC4 lineup.  

 

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post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post

How do these skis compare to  Kastle MX88?



See post just above. 

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post #9 of 25

I'm wondering how theses skis and especially the Blizzard to the Élan Amphibio 82Xti skis?  I think I saw a mention from Dawg that he has skied  those. 

post #10 of 25

Dawg

 

thanks

 

post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skinnydog View Post

I'm wondering how theses skis and especially the Blizzard to the Élan Amphibio 82Xti skis?  I think I saw a mention from Dawg that he has skied  those. 



Which Blizzard? 

 

The 82Xti Amphibio is a hell of a ski; grip is out of this world on groomers. I skied it on boilerplate and it had tons of power.  It is a pretty stout ski; probably better for bigger skiers.  I would compare it to the 8.1 as perhaps a bit stronger, a bit more powerful, a bit more stable, and a bit more ski to handle. I skied it in 176, and it skis long in this length; it is not a bad idea to size down if you aren't venturing into super deep snow.  Also, the Amphibio design does work; it tracks well on the inside ski (which is early rise) and has tons of grip on the outside ski (which is traditional camber).  Small, but noticeable.  Because it is stiff, I found it to be a handful off-piste in bumps, but bigger skiers seem to be happy on it. I do wish they made an 82ti still, something a little softer for us lightweights.

 

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post #12 of 25

Thanks, I did mean the 8.1 and I did suspect the 82Xti would be a little stiff for me as I'm 5'9" and weigh in the low 160s. 

post #13 of 25

2012 Blizzard Magnum 8.1ti

Length Tested: 172

Environment & Conditions:

In a word: lousy!  Tested at Copper Mountain.  Snow has been very sparse this season.  2” of new had fallen three days prior.  Constant heavy winds blowing ever since.  Blowing so hard on my demo day that the Super B was closed most of the morning.  Hardpack to glare ice in places with dense windblown snow along the edges.  Groomed runs were firm ridged corduroy.  In short, probably the worst conditions to try to test a ski that is targeted as a slightly backside biased all-mountain skiing.

Me:

Age:53.

Height/Weight: 5'-11”, 195

Level 8 or so, more finesse than aggressive, but like to push toward fast GS type skiing.  Ski the whole mountain, blue groomers to back bowls, except for the big moguls.

Review:

Conclusion: If you ski a ski in the worst conditions possible for that ski and it performs poorly, does that mean that the ski is a bad ski or did just what it should have done under the circumstances?  While I would, overall, give the ski good marks, it didn't rise above the poor skiing conditions and I remain a bit skeptical on early rise tips when skiing the front side.

 

Expertskier.com calls this ski “a Western ski with Eastern ice prowess”.  While I can see where this comment is coming from, I can’t recommend this ski for real boilerplate work. Three times when I laid the skis over and got my feet out from under me, the skis just broke away from me.  However, when there was a bit of softer snow for the tips and edges to grab, the skis did a great job of arcing across the fall line, nicely laying down GS turns.  I was expecting the ski to be a bit quicker side to side, but I could vary the turn shape as needed.  I’d also give it good marks for its willingness to skid without bucking or grabbing.  I did notice a bit more tip vibration when running straight than I’d like to see in a ski rated for up to race speeds.  It wasn’t overly “poppy”, but gave a nice rebound turn to turn, damp without being dead, i.e. good snow feel without being nervous or choppy.

 

I also wonder if the 172 length is just a bit too short for me.  Would have preferred to demo this in the 179 length, but it was not available.

 

Pros: Good solid ski in many respects.  When the snow was soft enough for the ski to bite, it handles very well.  Would loved to have seen how the early rise tip worked with a bit of deeper snow, but was non-existent on my demo day.  For an all-mountain go anywhere type of ski, I’m guessing that it would cover a good 70-80% of the conditions that one might face

 

Cons: Get it outside of its comfort zone and it doesn’t work well.

post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tag View Post

2012 Blizzard Magnum 8.1ti

Length Tested: 172

Environment & Conditions:

In a word: lousy!  Tested at Copper Mountain.  Snow has been very sparse this season.  2” of new had fallen three days prior.  Constant heavy winds blowing ever since.  Blowing so hard on my demo day that the Super B was closed most of the morning.  Hardpack to glare ice in places with dense windblown snow along the edges.  Groomed runs were firm ridged corduroy.  In short, probably the worst conditions to try to test a ski that is targeted as a slightly backside biased all-mountain skiing.

Me:

Age:53.

Height/Weight: 5'-11”, 195

Level 8 or so, more finesse than aggressive, but like to push toward fast GS type skiing.  Ski the whole mountain, blue groomers to back bowls, except for the big moguls.

Review:

Conclusion: If you ski a ski in the worst conditions possible for that ski and it performs poorly, does that mean that the ski is a bad ski or did just what it should have done under the circumstances?  While I would, overall, give the ski good marks, it didn't rise above the poor skiing conditions and I remain a bit skeptical on early rise tips when skiing the front side.

 

Expertskier.com calls this ski “a Western ski with Eastern ice prowess”.  While I can see where this comment is coming from, I can’t recommend this ski for real boilerplate work. Three times when I laid the skis over and got my feet out from under me, the skis just broke away from me.  However, when there was a bit of softer snow for the tips and edges to grab, the skis did a great job of arcing across the fall line, nicely laying down GS turns.  I was expecting the ski to be a bit quicker side to side, but I could vary the turn shape as needed.  I’d also give it good marks for its willingness to skid without bucking or grabbing.  I did notice a bit more tip vibration when running straight than I’d like to see in a ski rated for up to race speeds.  It wasn’t overly “poppy”, but gave a nice rebound turn to turn, damp without being dead, i.e. good snow feel without being nervous or choppy.

 

I also wonder if the 172 length is just a bit too short for me.  Would have preferred to demo this in the 179 length, but it was not available.

 

Pros: Good solid ski in many respects.  When the snow was soft enough for the ski to bite, it handles very well.  Would loved to have seen how the early rise tip worked with a bit of deeper snow, but was non-existent on my demo day.  For an all-mountain go anywhere type of ski, I’m guessing that it would cover a good 70-80% of the conditions that one might face

 

Cons: Get it outside of its comfort zone and it doesn’t work well.


Yeah 179 would have been the better size for sure, especially if you like to make longer radius turns.  Did you get the skis from a shop or was

it a manufacturers demo? 

 

I just wonder about the  "boiler plate" reccomendation as I've skied all off the Blizzards and the 8.1 has by far the best hard snow performance out of any of the

and is usually pretty high up there for it's category.  Yes there might be skis that are better but I doubt you would find someone that has skied a well tuned

8.1 that thought it was bad on hard snow.  I'm bigger and heavier than you and grew up ski racing and have never once had a complaint about edge

grip on hard snow on the 8.1, 8.7, or M-power.

 

Did you check the tune?  Unless you tuned the skis yourself or know that they are relatively new out of the wrapper it's pretty hard to evaluate a skis hard snow

performance if it's just a random demo ski out of a shop.  Some shops are great at maintaining their fleet but most can't keep up especially around the holidays,

and especially this year when the cover is thin and the demos are getting HAMMERED!!! And once a ski gets sent through "the machine" at the shop you really

have no idea if the tune is close to what the manufacturer reccomends.  Even one small burr can ruin a skis performance on hard snow.   Really it's hard to review

skis if you're just taking demos out of a shop, especially mid season, as they could be pretty haggard and really won't perform as well as intended.  Some shops

are good at tuning, and some just arent.  Whether they lack the machinery, man power, know how, etc.  There is really only one shop here in UT that I would

completely trust to replicate the factory tune (or even improve on it).  There are two others that could get the skis pretty close but I would never send a consumer

out on them without having to modify the tune slightly. 

 

post #15 of 25

I got these from a shop in Frisco.  Always a risk that the shop won't have a good tune on the skis; however, it wasn't a particularly busy day and there didn't seem to be much of a demand for these skis, so I would hope that they had them in good shape when I picked them up.  All three times that the ski "let go", I was driving into a turn, just starting to build up pressure on the ski/edge and suddenly the ski just wasn't there.  It felt to me that the tip let go.  Again, maybe in the longer length with more of a running surface edge before the early rise, this wouldn't be an issue.  Thankfully, the ski has a strong tail, so when the tip/edge gave out, I had something to push against to get back upright.

post #16 of 25

Dawg,

 

You say 'They out-performed the other skis on this day', I notice that day you also skied the Elan Apex which you seem to rate very highly in another of your reviews, would this mean that you would rate the Blizzard 8.1 over the Elan Apex?

 

Many thanks

post #17 of 25

What is the shop in UT? What edge angles do you recommend for the Blizz Magnum 7.4?

post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beejay View Post

Dawg,

 

You say 'They out-performed the other skis on this day', I notice that day you also skied the Elan Apex which you seem to rate very highly in another of your reviews, would this mean that you would rate the Blizzard 8.1 over the Elan Apex?

 

Many thanks



Hi,

 

It really depends. For frontside use, skill building, powerful groomers, and hardpack, I would rather be on the 8.1.  For mixed conditions, but not much new snow (say up to 8"), the Apex is probably the better bet. The 8.1 is by far the better carver, just as good in bumps.  Apex is smoother off-piste in crud.  Plus, it is softer in the tip and tail, and absorbs terrain better.  I can ski that in 177cm easily, whereas the equivalent length (comparing running surface) to the 8.1, it would be the 179 8.1.  The 179cm is a great length, but a lot more work than the Apex 177. 172cm is too short for crud at speed.

 

Long story short; if I was going for more of a GS and crud busting feel with versatility, the Apex is the choice.  More zing on the groomers yet still versatile, the 8.1 would be the choice.  I could find the speed limit on the 172 pretty easily, though. 

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post #19 of 25

Thankyou! A quick question/thread hijack if I may (apologies). Living in London the Stockli skis are starting to make a name for themselves here in Europe.

 

I currently have the Laser SC (brilliant on skiedout icy conditions) and the Laser SX (brilliant everywhere, 70 underfoot) . But I am trying to see what the latest and greatest are for 2012 and whether I need a slightly wider ski to add to my quiver? (78-81 underfoort?).

 

I'm looking at the Kastle MX78 (160 or 168) or the 8.1 (165),  and maybe the Apex (159 or 168) (but its 88 underfoot)

I’m 38, 5'8", being skiing 30 yrs, 20days a yr, ability 8.5/10, ski 90% on groomed slopes and occasionally veer off into untracked slopes but only up to say 6", love going fast down slopes but also like v v steep tricky runs and slopes).

 

I'd be very grateful for your recommendation (or does the SX cover me at the moment?)

 

Also the MX78 seems to be twice the price of the elan, and 50% more than the 8.1, is it really that good?

 

Many thanks

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by beejay View Post

Thankyou! A quick question/thread hijack if I may (apologies). Living in London the Stockli skis are starting to make a name for themselves here in Europe.

 

I currently have the Laser SC (brilliant on skiedout icy conditions) and the Laser SX (brilliant everywhere, 70 underfoot) . But I am trying to see what the latest and greatest are for 2012 and whether I need a slightly wider ski to add to my quiver? (78-81 underfoort?).

 

I'm looking at the Kastle MX78 (160 or 168) or the 8.1 (165),  and maybe the Apex (159 or 168) (but its 88 underfoot)

I’m 38, 5'8", being skiing 30 yrs, 20days a yr, ability 8.5/10, ski 90% on groomed slopes and occasionally veer off into untracked slopes but only up to say 6", love going fast down slopes but also like v v steep tricky runs and slopes).

 

I'd be very grateful for your recommendation (or does the SX cover me at the moment?)

 

Also the MX78 seems to be twice the price of the elan, and 50% more than the 8.1, is it really that good?

 

Many thanks

Simply. Yes. 
 

 

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by wasatchback View Post

Yeah 179 would have been the better size for sure, especially if you like to make longer radius turns.  Did you get the skis from a shop or was

it a manufacturers demo? 

 

I just wonder about the  "boiler plate" reccomendation as I've skied all off the Blizzards and the 8.1 has by far the best hard snow performance out of any of the

and is usually pretty high up there for it's category.  Yes there might be skis that are better but I doubt you would find someone that has skied a well tuned

8.1 that thought it was bad on hard snow.  I'm bigger and heavier than you and grew up ski racing and have never once had a complaint about edge

grip on hard snow on the 8.1, 8.7, or M-power.

 

Did you check the tune?  Unless you tuned the skis yourself or know that they are relatively new out of the wrapper it's pretty hard to evaluate a skis hard snow

performance if it's just a random demo ski out of a shop.  Some shops are great at maintaining their fleet but most can't keep up especially around the holidays,

and especially this year when the cover is thin and the demos are getting HAMMERED!!! And once a ski gets sent through "the machine" at the shop you really

have no idea if the tune is close to what the manufacturer reccomends.  Even one small burr can ruin a skis performance on hard snow.   Really it's hard to review

skis if you're just taking demos out of a shop, especially mid season, as they could be pretty haggard and really won't perform as well as intended.  Some shops

are good at tuning, and some just arent.  Whether they lack the machinery, man power, know how, etc.  There is really only one shop here in UT that I would

completely trust to replicate the factory tune (or even improve on it).  There are two others that could get the skis pretty close but I would never send a consumer

out on them without having to modify the tune slightly. 

 



I've yet to find a ski that was close to very good out of the wrapper.......nonono2.gif

 

post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beejay View Post

Thankyou! A quick question/thread hijack if I may (apologies). Living in London the Stockli skis are starting to make a name for themselves here in Europe.

 

I currently have the Laser SC (brilliant on skiedout icy conditions) and the Laser SX (brilliant everywhere, 70 underfoot) . But I am trying to see what the latest and greatest are for 2012 and whether I need a slightly wider ski to add to my quiver? (78-81 underfoort?).

 

I'm looking at the Kastle MX78 (160 or 168) or the 8.1 (165),  and maybe the Apex (159 or 168) (but its 88 underfoot)

I’m 38, 5'8", being skiing 30 yrs, 20days a yr, ability 8.5/10, ski 90% on groomed slopes and occasionally veer off into untracked slopes but only up to say 6", love going fast down slopes but also like v v steep tricky runs and slopes).

 

I'd be very grateful for your recommendation (or does the SX cover me at the moment?)

 

Also the MX78 seems to be twice the price of the elan, and 50% more than the 8.1, is it really that good?

 

Many thanks


Depends on what it is worth to you, but the MX78 is simply sublime in how versatile and powerful it is, for such an easy ride.  But I hear you, they aren't cheap, but it is a classic example of getting what you pay for.  If you are a fan of Stockli, then the Kastles are that kind of quality and feel.  MX78 is much more versatile than the Laser SX or the Cross SX (having owned or at least skied both quite a bit).  You won't give up much, if anything, on hard snow, and get more all-mountain versatility than you ever expected. 

 

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post #23 of 25

What shop in PArk City do you recommend for tuning??

post #24 of 25

Colesport if you want a good tune done quickly at a good price.   Podium if you want the ultimate tune.  The turn around is a bit longer but they do an amazing job!  This is where a lot of the companies based in UT have their skis ground and prepped for the Mag tests as well as the early testing at trade fairs, etc.  Run by two guys that used to tune on the World Cup.

post #25 of 25

Thanks. Colesport is a really well laid out, first class shop in PCMR. We're heading there next week and trying to decide which ride to take: Blizz Mag 7.4, Blizz Sonic or Dynastar Contact Groove.  Only skied 7.4 at Mammoth and the bottoms got trashed in two hours on the hill last month. No matter which I take, I'll be wishing the others were along for a ride.

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