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Utah: The greatest snow on Earth, but the worst terrain in Northern America

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

I was out riding around looking for a place to ski in the backcountry a few days ago. In fact, I'm leaving in a bit to go ski a nice looking hill with a few chutes.

 

I would like to add that after my 3-hour long ride I found one (1) place to ski. The snow quality was wonderful, the weather was great, and because the locals are pu****s I literally have the ENTIRE backcountry to me, my skis, the deer, and some friendly (hopefully not trigger happy) hunters... That said, my #1 complaint about skiing in Utah (central to be more specific) is that you really can't just start walking any direction and find a perfect spot - unlike dirt bikes.

 

 

First off, most of the central and southern part of the state is engulfed in redrock and sandstone hills, which not only are really good heat conductors, but also are usually too low to get *that* much snow.

Secondly, the mountains that do have a good 30" of powpow are completely covered in these evergreens-without-trunks, which means you can't use that mountain if there's too many, they're just too big.

And thirdly, if you do happen to find a mountain, that has no rocks, no weird evergreen shrubs, and has enough snow on it, chances are it's WAY too steep to do anything on!

 

 

So that's my little complaint about Utah, as I said, greatest snow on Earth, worst terrain in North America.

 

 

 

What are your thoughts on Utah's backcountry?

post #2 of 26

Really?  Your probably right, there is no good terrain in Utah.  Your probably better served scoping out the good stuff in Ohio or maybe Pennsylvania.

 

I tend to stick inbounds, but the one time I went back country; off the Supreme lift at Alta was wicked great!

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kermit88 View Post

Really?  Your probably right, there is no good terrain in Utah.  Your probably better served scoping out the good stuff in Ohio or maybe Pennsylvania.

 

I tend to stick inbounds, but the one time I went back country; off the Supreme lift at Alta was wicked great!


 

Yeah Alta's pretty sick, but keep in mind that "backcountry" was still basically the resort tongue.gif

post #4 of 26

It sucks don't come here. The mountains are way to steep for skiing. Total effing disaster. etc...


Edited by tromano - 12/17/11 at 7:37am
post #5 of 26

Utah, worst terrain in N. America.  Wow.  I'll have to try Saskatchewan, North and South Dakota, Nebraska, Minnesota, Kansas...

post #6 of 26

I would agree that the scrub oak crap (moose food), makes access at the lower elevations pretty difficult at times.  I have multiple slash marks on all my ski clothing from shinning & ducking that sh!t.

 

Cutler Ridgte 010.JPG

 

JF

post #7 of 26

Backcountry sucks here. Powder too. Stay home.

post #8 of 26

Nobody mentioned the snakes?  Lots of snakes there, too. 

 

One of the great parts of driving thru UT is in fact looking at the terrain.  But, it's one of those states where snake aversion training is a good idea for your BC pooch.  For Fido's sake if nothing else, CO may be a better bet.

 

 

 

 

post #9 of 26

This is why I live in New Jersey! 

post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post

Nobody mentioned the snakes?  Lots of snakes there, too. 

 

One of the great parts of driving thru UT is in fact looking at the terrain.  But, it's one of those states where snake aversion training is a good idea for your BC pooch.  For Fido's sake if nothing else, CO may be a better bet.

 

 

 

 



Okay I'ma have to call this one out, of all the problems with Utah and skiing in Utah, why snakes? I mean, yes Utah has snakes, and according to Bear Grylls we have the top 12 most poisonous snakes in North America (?). But why snakes? I mean, the last thing on my mind while skiing is the fear of snakes jumping out at me eek.gif

But now you have me worried :P

post #11 of 26

The worst and deadliest are the white ones that give no warning found in exactly the area where you were skiiing, and year round! eek.gif   

post #12 of 26
Kind of early in the season to complain isn't it?
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

The worst and deadliest are the white ones that give no warning found in exactly the area where you were skiiing, and year round! eek.gif   



Snow snakes! Yikes!

post #14 of 26

twistedkeys you are a clueless gaper that is  going to kill yourself, or a a troll. If you do not know what troll is then you are a clueless gaper that is going to kill themselves.

 

If snow is sticking to something and you say 'its to steep to ski(for you)" it is skiable but most likely its also avalanche prone which you nothing about.

 

the thing is from your post you have business attempting this and its once a in blue moon when there is enough snow to do this!

 

 

 

 

 

post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

twistedkeys you are a clueless gaper that is  going to kill yourself, or a a troll. If you do not know what troll is then you are a clueless gaper that is going to kill themselves.

 

If snow is sticking to something and you say 'its to steep to ski(for you)" it is skiable but most likely its also avalanche prone which you nothing about.

 

the thing is from your post you have business attempting this and its once a in blue moon when there is enough snow to do this!

 

 

 

 

 


True, honestly I'm a new skier (and I'm not afraid to tell anyone!) and I just can't ski straight down a mountain. But as far as that goes I think my point is fairly accurate. At least considering where I live and how young the year is according to Huhh.

 

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedkeys View Post


True, honestly I'm a new skier (and I'm not afraid to tell anyone!) and I just can't ski straight down a mountain. But as far as that goes I think my point is fairly accurate. At least considering where I live and how young the year is according to Huhh.

 


those guys in the video arent going straight down the mountain are they?

 

post #17 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedkeys View Post


True, honestly I'm a new skier (and I'm not afraid to tell anyone!) and I just can't ski straight down a mountain. But as far as that goes I think my point is fairly accurate. At least considering where I live and how young the year is according to Huhh.

 


those guys in the video arent going straight down the mountain are they?

 



 

To me? Yes, they are. Maybe in the future I'll learn to enjoy what I got (even if it tears the wax straight off my skis), but for now I'm pretty picky rolleyes.gif

post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

twistedkeys you are a clueless gaper that is  going to kill yourself, or a a troll. If you do not know what troll is then you are a clueless gaper that is going to kill themselves.

 

If snow is sticking to something and you say 'its to steep to ski(for you)" it is skiable but most likely its also avalanche prone which you nothing about.

 

the thing is from your post you have business attempting this and its once a in blue moon when there is enough snow to do this!

 

 

 

 

 


Can't do that in the East.

 

post #19 of 26

Worst terrain in North America? Have you been to Houston?

post #20 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by csavage View Post

Worst terrain in North America? Have you been to Houston?



They have snow in Houston? 

post #21 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedkeys View Post



They have snow in Houston? 


Exactly.

post #22 of 26


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post


Exactly.

As we say around here, "that's bizaaah"
 

 

post #23 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedkeys View Post


What are your thoughts on Utah's backcountry?



The Wasatch front has good snow and some good terrain.  But it's a relatively small range, very close to a large metro=lot's of pressure on the BC.  Often by 20 somethings that just moved out from NJ.  It's the summit county of the BC!

post #24 of 26

Ability to ski the fall-line keeps descents fun, no doubt.

post #25 of 26

Wow.  Really?  I didn't know it was possible to get that much "fail" into one post.

 

twistedkeys, if you're going to be a backcountry skier you clearly need to learn a bunch about terrain selection and about keeping yourself safe.  However, you're not likely to have anyone to learn from if you dis the local skiing and call the local skiers "pussies."  Get over yourself, park the know-it-all attitude, get a little humble and open your mind to learning.

 

I'm pretty willing, generally speaking, to take a newbie out and show him/her around, but there's not an ice cube's chance in hell I'd take somebody with the attitude you exhibited in your OP out for a ski day.  Why?  Because you're just as likely to get me killed as you are to kill yourself.  Screw that.  

FWIW, Utah has absolutely amazing backcountry terrain.  I don't know where you live, but I'd be willing to bet that you don't know enough to know how to spot a good line.  Given that you live in Utah there's likely a local cadre of experienced backcountry skiers where you live who DO know how to spot a good line.  These are people you want to get to know, but they aren't going to give you the time of day unless you adjust your attitude.

Go to the Utah Avalanche Center website, get yourself in an avy class.  Chances are that you'll meet some folks who know their way around where you live.  Be a sponge.  And then get back to us with some photos of all of the garbage skiing to be found in Utah.  rolleyes.gif

post #26 of 26

 

Now, Mountaingirl, don't go telling twistedkeys to lose his 'tude and get humble.  I'm finding his posts and the responses to them VERY amusing!!!  Why ruin a good thing???

 

As a hot tip, I understand Lubbock, Texas, got hit with quite a bit snow over the last few days, and I'm sure there's some friendlier terrain around there!

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