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What determines the life-span of a ski?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

In your expert opinions what is the limiting factor in terms of making skis last?

Is it Top-sheet delamination? Depletion of bases through base grinds? Becoming technilogicly out moded? Something else?

How long should a pair of skis last if well maintained?

 

Just curious...

post #2 of 19

Certainly too many base grinds could do it.  I only get mine ground every 1-2 years.  Hitting a lot of gnarly moguls hard will tend after a while to make the ski limper relative to its original self.  But, for MOST skiers, it's the ski becoming technologically outmoded.  The rule of thumb used to be 100 days.  Frankly after I retired and found myself skiing more while earning less, that 100 day benchmark got thrown out the window.  

post #3 of 19

For me, I find that at some point (I have several skis and don't have an accurate feel for how many days I have total on each) the ski becomes less lively and I get less rebound out of the turn. I keep my skis in good shape and tuned up well and only get a grind once a year tops and more like every 2. I have never had top sheet issues. The less lively is critical if the ski is a race ski but less so if it is (as is the case now) my mid fat spring crud ski. I got a much wider ski this year so I'll see how that works for me before deciding if these get retired or still have a place.

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your replies. icon14.gif

post #5 of 19

In theory a powder ski should last longer because far less force is being exerted on it (assuming you're actually skiing a lot of powder).  Right?

post #6 of 19

Being from Pennsylvania, my new powder skis should last forever.

post #7 of 19

They usually last til you see something more shiny and pretty that you like better and just have to have.  For some that is 3 months, for some that is 13 years.  But, a well cared for pair of skis (not actual serious race trainer skis) can easily last 100 ski days if properly maintained and not wrecked on rocks

post #8 of 19

I am pretty sure I have over 100 days on my Exclusive Legends, the mid fat that seems to have lost some pop.

post #9 of 19

Yeah, I used to say that, too.  Until that meant skiing only 1.5 seasons.  It's amazing how long a ski can last once you are retired with little income...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

They usually last til you see something more shiny and pretty that you like better and just have to have.  For some that is 3 months, for some that is 13 years.  But, a well cared for pair of skis (not actual serious race trainer skis) can easily last 100 ski days if properly maintained and not wrecked on rocks



 

post #10 of 19

So here's a related question:

 

How many times can you grind the base of a typical ski before you grind through the base?

 

-Monti

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by montizano View Post

So here's a related question:

 

How many times can you grind the base of a typical ski before you grind through the base?

 

-Monti


edges get pretty thin after lots of grinds., and probably are the issue at that point. I use my old bandit xxxs for rock skis and they were built well as they still rail but the edges are almost nonexistent,, so as a testbed to practice ski repair skills they are outstanding

 

post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

They usually last til you see something more shiny and pretty that you like better and just have to have.

 

This.  I don't think I've replaced a pair yet because they were actually worn out.  But I only get about 20 days a year.  Some of the people here that put 100+ days on their skis a season are probably in a different boat.

post #13 of 19

 I think a wood core lasts longer then foam.

 

I stopped getting my skis based ground years ago once I understood that the base becomes so thin after a few grounds any small rock will become a core shot.

 

I think a longer ski will bend & or break easier then a shorter ski of the same material due to leverage.

 

 Not sure if it makes any difference but I never have the base of my skis facing the sun when I stand them in the racks while having lunch.

post #14 of 19

I have had more than a couple of pair of Volkl All Mountain skis that still ski great at 150+ day's I tune my own skis, most of my skis only see the sjop when I can't fix them. I think my AC40's have never been stone ground, I got them in Feb 08. I average 60+ days a season.

 

My AC4's had over 150 day's on them when I sold them, I should have kept them...

 

My AX3's had a few less day's because I bent one (day 28) of the first pair I had and volkl sent me new ones.

 

 

I have larger size buddy who likes to get the season tune's and he goes through skis much faster then I do.

 

 

post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder Jet View Post

 

 Not sure if it makes any difference but I never have the base of my skis facing the sun when I stand them in the racks while having lunch.


Seems more like superstition, but I'm willing to listen to the reason why you do this????
 

 

post #16 of 19

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder Jet View Post

 

 Not sure if it makes any difference but I never have the base of my skis facing the sun when I stand them in the racks while having lunch.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post


Seems more like superstition, but I'm willing to listen to the reason why you do this????
 

 


 

Because skis look so much better with a spray tantongue.gif

 

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post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powder Jet View Post

 I think a wood core lasts longer then foam.

 

Agree, I won't buy foam core skis as they seem to become noodles far faster than a wood core ski.

post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 

Good to know.

And thanks for all the replies.icon14.gif

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDog View Post


Seems more like superstition, but I'm willing to listen to the reason why you do this????
 

 

 

I presume the perceived reason is UV degradation of the PTex, but I'm not sure how large an effect that would be unless you take REEEALLY long lunches.
 

 

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