New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Toe warmers

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Not sure where else to stick this. I found a great deal on Grabber Toe Warmers on fleabay, $33 for a box of forty pair. Usually it's about $45 for a box that size. PM me or I'll post the link here if it is OK.

 

I've looked at Hotronics and other things but these little warmers just work so well for me.

 

:)

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 16

nice price,

 

lowest I found were Hot Toes (Toastie Toes?) 8 hr, 16 pr at $10 at Sams Club. These are early season deals but similar price too.  Anytime you get toe warmers under a buck ... of course, i bought some once that were square without the adhesive.  I check now for the rounded toe with adhesive

post #3 of 16

If you find your feet regularly get cold, boot gloves are a good solution. http://www.amazon.com/DryGuy-BootGlove-Boot-Covers/dp/B000MTRX9U

 

I only needed to use them in the east, as it's not so cold out here in the west. But they add about 5 degrees celcius (what, ~15f?). And they last for many seasons.

post #4 of 16

We used to buy those toe warmers for my kids before they had their own boots (one now has Hotronics, the other never gets cold). Costco used to carry that box of 40, but we never needed that many and they're not kidding about those expiry dates (go past them, and you'll find they don't work well, if at all). Pricewise, I did much better buying the 8 packs at TJ Maxx/Marshalls or places Modells/Sports Authority after they started to dump their Winter inventory.

 

Personally, I could never fit them comfortably in my boots, and though I know people who swear by Boot Gloves, I didn't find them very effective. For my money, Hotronics are the way to go.

 

post #5 of 16

agree with the boot gloves.  my wife used to use warmers 100% of the time.  bought boot gloves for her and she hasn't used the warmers in 3 yrs.  

 

One thing though, if ya get some look for the ones with foil tape for the toe box and foot bottoms.  The foil helps even when you don't don the glove

post #6 of 16

Boot gloves are just good insulators. They work well but... They are effective only if they are put on before you head out. Depending on the outside temp, they can start losing their effectiveness as soon as you're outside. They can get wet and they can be obstructions to your buckets for those who like to unfasten and/or adjust them on the fly.

 

As for toe warmers, these chemical packs work really well but they have a shelf life of about 1 year. Buying them online is not a good idea and either is buying them from TJ Maxx and such (Maxx/Marshalls are surplus stores for these items). At half price, warmers aren't good bargains when they aren't hot or last less than half as long.

 

Like most quality goods, local ski shops and outdoor stores are your best bet. But, the best bang for the buck that I've found for warmer packs is at Walmart, especially in the Northeast. They stock up in huge quality in late fall every year for the hunting season. There are several styles available (feet, toes, body, fingers, etc.) and they are cheap (like 2/$1 for toes and 3-4/$1 for fingers). This allows you not have to buy in fixed amounts and they are always fresh stock. When you run out, you just run out to get more. We swear by doing that for several years now.

post #7 of 16

I use plug boots with paper-thin liners and ski in Vermont and upstate NY.  I have used boot gloves since about a month after I got the boots.  They make a huge difference.  Today I went to the Beast of the East....it was 0F at the top at 8am...I forgot to bring my boot gloves and my feet were freezing.  I skied with them at Iceface a few years ago on a day that didn't reach 0F and my feet were fine all day.  I'm sold on them but as others have said, you have to put them on when the boots are warm.  I had my boots fit and I never mess with my buckles...not necessary.

post #8 of 16

Another bootglove fan.  Keep my warmer sticks in the boots with mitten shoved in to keep the warmth in.  Get in the lodge and put the still warm boots on there.  Add bootgloves in the lodge if I think I'll need them and I'm good for the day.  

 

And, this is in Montana where the wind chill at the top can be negative 25 to 40 F or more.  I just dress warm and use the bootgloves.  Never wanted to fool around with drilling my boots for Hottronics or worrying about dead batteries, catching the things on the bottom of the chair, etc.  The gloves when I got them were all of $15 and worth ten times that for the results.  

post #9 of 16

I like the boot gloves as well. I Patrol at night with them, they really cut the wind and also act to keep moisture out and keep the feet dry. Just my .o2

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daveski7 View Post

I like the boot gloves as well. I Patrol at night with them, they really cut the wind and also act to keep moisture out and keep the feet dry. Just my .o2


I've really been struggling with feeling cold air circulation in my boots - as in 'sit on the lift and when the wind blows I can feel it'.  I don't have cold feet in general, but if you can feel the outside air, it would seem that no toe warmer is going to be enough.

 

I've been thinking of going to an Intuition wrap liner to help and I have the boot gloves which help some, but certainly were not a cure.  Is the shell of the boot supposed to be completely sealed in terms of wind or am I experiencing a common issue?  I have skinny calves and have assumed that the upper cuff buckle position must be doing something to the shell fit...so was interested to see a comment on 'really cut the wind'.  My boot is a performance fit, especially now that I have my new custom orthotics (Lee @ Custom Foot) and I am thinking I must be missing something.

 

Sorry for the hijack...

post #11 of 16

I can't imagine feeling the wind on your feet AT ALL, except psychologically.  Don't you pull the pant gaiter over the top edge?  Granted I have big calves, but there is no way for any wind to get in my boots unless they are unbuckled.  I can't even get a finger in them.  Nor do they get wet from leaking if I walk through puddles.  I've heard of that, but my boots just aren't constructed that way.  

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I can't imagine feeling the wind on your feet AT ALL, except psychologically.  Don't you pull the pant gaiter over the top edge?  Granted I have big calves, but there is no way for any wind to get in my boots unless they are unbuckled.  I can't even get a finger in them.  Nor do they get wet from leaking if I walk through puddles.  I've heard of that, but my boots just aren't constructed that way.  


I'm hoping its not psychological eek.gif, but since there is a cause/effect I'm pretty sure I am ok on that front.  I have the gaiter over the boot - it seems to be driven by having narrow/high calves, which forces the boot overlap to pull too far across itself at the instep breaking the boot seal.  My buckles are two finger tight for the right fit in the locker room, but I can easily get a finger in around my calves once I've skied a couple of runs and the top buckle loosens up a bit.  Tighten it up one notch, and then the problems begin, leave it loose and I have to move too much to flex the boot.

 

I am keeping on this with my fitter - he thought things looked ok in the shop in terms of calf fit, but it's not translating on the mountain.  Boots may also be too soft for me at this stage (Hawx 80) and it's time for an upgrade....just hate to chase this with money and looking for a sanity biggrin.gif check.  Thanks for the input, it helps.

post #13 of 16

How on earth could you experience the joy of that stabbing, piercing, burning, excruciating pain of thawing your toes back out if you never let them freeze?

post #14 of 16

for you lovers of boot gloves,If you have a old one,take the stitching out and use it as a pattern on a old 3mm or 5mm wet suit. glue your joints together with wet suit glue,when dry stitch them up yourself or have someone do it on a machine, flat lock stitch works great, seal up stitching. the thicker neoprene works even better.

post #15 of 16

I wasn't actually talking about wind getting inside my boots, there is no room in my boots for anything. I was more referring to wind chill on those blustery evenings. I also do not experience the leaking but a buddy of mine has a pair of Nordicas that do and these prevent this from happening.

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I can't imagine feeling the wind on your feet AT ALL, except psychologically. 

 

Those would have to be some pretty loose boots! (or made out of old rags?)

 

My boots slightly leak due to the flap design. It makes skiing on rainy days pretty... squishy. Maybe I'll start wearing my boot gloves on rainy days! Thanks for the idea.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion