EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Binding question: Will a shop adjust cosmetically broken (but fully functional) bindings to fit my new boots?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Binding question: Will a shop adjust cosmetically broken (but fully functional) bindings to fit my new boots?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

First off, apologies for the terrible quality of images, it's the best camera I have at the moment.

 

I just picked up a new pair of boots in November, and had my main pair of skis adjusted to fit them, no problems since the skis were new last year.

 

My concern is in regards to my older pair of skis/bindings that I picked up in 2004.  The skis are Line Skogen Sprang Pro's, the bindings are Look Pivot 10.  On the heelpiece, there is an acrylic cover (the grey bit in the first picture below) that is mostly cosmetic, but also has the number scale for the DIN adjustment.  A season or two ago, one of the acrylic covers cracked and fell off, meaning that on that binding you cannot read the DIN setting for the heelpeice (second picture below).  Would a shop be able to adjust these bindings to my new boots, either by setting the first indicator by the scale then measuring to set the second, or would I be better off looking to replace the bindings?  The bindings appear to be on a track/raised mounting system, so I doubt new bindings would require re-drilling, but I don't have much experience in that matter.

 

Thanks for any advice/comments you may have.  

 

lN44A.jpg

Heelpiece without acrylic cover.

post #2 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indus View Post

First off, apologies for the terrible quality of images, it's the best camera I have at the moment.

 

I just picked up a new pair of boots in November, and had my main pair of skis adjusted to fit them, no problems since the skis were new last year.

 

My concern is in regards to my older pair of skis/bindings that I picked up in 2004.  The skis are Line Skogen Sprang Pro's, the bindings are Look Pivot 10.  On the heelpiece, there is an acrylic cover (the grey bit in the first picture below) that is mostly cosmetic, but also has the number scale for the DIN adjustment.  A season or two ago, one of the acrylic covers cracked and fell off, meaning that on that binding you cannot read the DIN setting for the heelpeice (second picture below).  Would a shop be able to adjust these bindings to my new boots, either by setting the first indicator by the scale then measuring to set the second, or would I be better off looking to replace the bindings?  The bindings appear to be on a track/raised mounting system, so I doubt new bindings would require re-drilling, but I don't have much experience in that matter.

 

Thanks for any advice/comments you may have.  

 

lN44A.jpg

Heelpiece without acrylic cover.


Your answer is in red. CANNOT READ DIN SETTTING is the key. The binding fails visual inspection. Sorry. 

 

You might be able to find a replacement heel (another Pivot 10) to replace this one with. 

 

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

That's about what I suspected/was afraid of, I understand no shop would want to touch these.  I'll scour the web for a possible replacement.

 

Thanks for the fast reply.

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indus View Post

That's about what I suspected/was afraid of, I understand no shop would want to touch these.  I'll scour the web for a possible replacement.

 

Thanks for the fast reply.



Ebay. 

post #5 of 7

You should replace it anyway.  If the plastic cover is gone it can fill with ice (or water then freeze) and fail.  That is more than cosmetic.  Even my cheapness wouldn't entertain skiing that.

post #6 of 7

In addition to bindings releasing for the safety of the skier when the skier falls, is the design/type of downhill bindings important? [excluding telemark bindings which function quite differently]

 

I ask this question because one tends to see on some manufacturer's website about how a binding is designed to provide more power to the edge of the ski, inter-pivoting heel technology, precise power transmission etc.... what do these mean?


Edited by Fortini - 12/15/11 at 5:49pm
post #7 of 7

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fortini View Post

In addition to bindings releasing for the safety of the skier when the skier falls, is the design/type of downhill bindings important? [excluding telemark bindings which function quite differently]

 

I ask this question because one tends to see on some manufacturer's website about how a binding is designed to provide more power to the edge of the ski, inter-pivoting heel technology, precise power transmission etc.... what do these mean?


IMHO, mostly marketing-speak.  The possible exception (performance-wise) would be bindings with an integrated plate or rail system.  (Riser plates do have a real effect on ski performance.)

 

This is not something I would lose sleep over in general.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Binding question: Will a shop adjust cosmetically broken (but fully functional) bindings to fit my new boots?