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Puch Bicycle

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 

My daughter had her bicycle stolen. It was a Schwinn Caliente. I believe it was from the late 1970s and from what I have researched, it weighed 37 lbs. She rides in downtown Philadelphia, PA.

 

She came across a Puch Criterium. I don't have much other information. All I can tell from the pictures is that the label on the down tube and the front forks reads 1020 Hi-Ten Uni-lite. I have no information regarding components at this time. I can't find any info on the internet.

 

Does anyone have any information regarding this bike, how it compares to the Claiente, etc?

 

Thank you.

 

Gary

post #2 of 19

Schwinn Caliente to Puch Criterium ... wow.         

 

These are both low-end  1970s bike boom bikes that sort of hung on into the early '80s.      Stem shifting,  steel wheels, on the heavy side for their day and on the rather heavy side now.   Neither are really worth upgrading to modern parts.   

 

Something more modern (from the mid-80s on up) will give her better shifting, better parts availability, better braking (steel wheels are heavy and *suck* at braking especially when wet).  

 

The fact that someone in Philly thought it was worthwhile to steal a Caliente ... nonono2.gif

 

Oh, the Puch is lighter but doesn't have the fancy front freewheel of the Caliente, so shifting will feel a little different.

post #3 of 19

Some people like retro, just as some don't see the need for gears or brakes..... go figure th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 

The owner furnished this additional info:

 

This is a vintage bike from the 1970’s. It has OEM components by Suntour. However, I have upgraded the bolt-on 27 x 1 1/4 stock chrome steel wheelset to Weinmann 700 x 25C Q/R alloy wheels. I also installed brand new Panaracer tires and new tubes.
Matching Derailleur components are Suntour Accu-shift 1500C

 

Does any of this info change your opinion?

post #5 of 19

 

The Weinmanns with Panaracers ARE a definite upgrade, but I have to ask how the owner adjusted the brake reach since the new wheels are shorter than the stock ones.    Were the brake calipers also swapped, or were the originals center-pull type and the pads now sit at the very limit of brake reach?

 

I like Suntour parts,  but I do not like Accushift - no reason to change any part of my opinion.

 

The good news is that she could trivially swap the handlebars out to any shape she likes so long as the brake levers fit.     I had a similar bike set up once with stem shifting and a triangular-type triathlon bar - cycle home with a pizza or a computer sitting on the bars no problem.

post #6 of 19

That Caliente is a hot bike! tongue.gif

 

Sorry to make light of your daughter's loss, I couldn't help myself.

 

How much are they asking for the Puch?

 

The Schwinn's "fancy front freewheel" sounds interesting, but the Puch will probably serve your daughter's needs just as well.

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 

She is going to look at it tonight. She will check out the brakes for lever travel (I assume that is what you are referring to as limit of brake reach).

 

Big thing she needs to check is whether the bike fits - she is rather petite.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

That Caliente is a hot bike! tongue.gif

 

Sorry to make light of your daughter's loss, I couldn't help myself.

 

How much are they asking for the Puch?

 

The Schwinn's "fancy front freewheel" sounds interesting, but the Puch will probably serve your daughter's needs just as well.



I know that the Caliente supposedly came with the front freewheel, but hers did not have it - must have been switched out at some point by a previous owner or store.

He was asking 200 for the Puch but came down to 175 when offered 150

post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 

My last post did not get posted. I think it is being moderated because it was a response.

So I will post it as a direct post and see if it gets posted.

The puch is 175 (He asked 200, my daughter countered with 150 and he said he would split the difference)

I know the Caliente was supposed to have a free wheel, but hers did not - must have been removed by a prior owner or a shop at some point.

post #10 of 19

Brake reach is how far from the mounting point at the fork the brake pads can sit.   

 

The 700c rim sits lower in the fork than the OEM 27" rim (assuming the fork is original) and the brake pads need to be dropped within the caliper for proper contact to the rim.

 

If the fork is /not/ original, check the underside of the downtube behind the headtube for creasing or kinking - a replacement fork and a creased downtube are signs of a crashed or garage-doored bike.

 

(This is usually not visible just looking at the bike from above.  You have to flip the bike over or reach under and feel with your fingers).
 

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaryK227 View Post

 

She will check out the brakes for lever travel (I assume that is what you are referring to as limit of brake reach).

 

Big thing she needs to check is whether the bike fits - she is rather petite.



 

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryK227 View Post



I know that the Caliente supposedly came with the front freewheel, but hers did not have it - must have been switched out at some point by a previous owner or store.

He was asking 200 for the Puch but came down to 175 when offered 150


Don't pay more than $100.

 

post #12 of 19



 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post


Don't pay more than $100.

 



In the DC market that bike would be $80 uncrashed and with the new rims / for $150 one could shop for newer hardtail MTBs .   

 

  I do however understand that Philly is a bit of a different market, the woman is probably without other commuting means and is probably ready to pay a $40-50 premium for ready-to-ride condition.

 

 

 


.   

post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 

She saw the bike. No evidence of any crash damage. She can stand over the top tube comfortably. She liked it and bought it. She is taking it to a bike shop to have it checked out and to make sure everything is good to go.

 

Thanks to everyone for your input. It has been an education.

post #14 of 19

So...interesting place to choose to ask about a bike; do you ski?

 

post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 

No, I don't ski. I found this forum through Google. There were other bicycle threads as well as a bicycle category, so I posted.

I haven't skied since 1977 when I skied Sugarbush.

post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryK227 View Post

No, I don't ski. I found this forum through Google. There were other bicycle threads as well as a bicycle category, so I posted.

I haven't skied since 1977 when I skied Sugarbush.


 

Welcome.    

 

 

(and a story about Sugarbush in 1977 is always appreciated, pictures even more so).

post #17 of 19

37 pounds? Holy cow.

 

You can buy something off craigslit for 200$ and under 23 pounds..

 

 

post #18 of 19

Interesting.  I've donated better bicycles to Goodwill.  Was once tempted,  for sentimental purposes,  by a Motobecane Mirage they had there for peanuts.  I wanted that exact bike so bad when I was a kid.  Now it's a tank!

 

AM.

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post

37 pounds? Holy cow.


 

Varsity tubing was HEAVY.     Did you ever read the article on electroforging and how the frames were built?   http://sheldonbrown.com/varsity.html

 

This was a Craigslist find, apparently.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Attacking Mid View Post

Interesting.  I've donated better bicycles to Goodwill. 


*wants to shop at AM's Goodwill store*

 

I think about the best I've seen at the one near me is an older Sterling with 600 on it.

 

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