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SL Turns MA Practice

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Instead of studying for finals, I thought I would assemble a carving video from last season. I figured it would be a good way for everyone to dust off the MA cobwebs for the new season.

 

The skier: 205 lb, 23 years old, ex-racer. 

Equipment: Nordica Dobermann Aggressor 130 boots, old Nordica Dobermann SLR 165s with marker plate + binders
Location/Conditions : Easter weekend at Arapahoe Basin, mid-winter conditions though. Very soft freshly groomed snow. 

 

My goal for this video was powerful, smooth, arc-to-arc SL-style turns. My specific focus was to implement a flexed transition and work on earlier tipping in the high-c portion of the turn for earlier engagement, as I had been lacking all of that previously. As a consequence of these changes, I sometimes wind up in the back seat, but I think it is coming along well overall.

 

Any comments are appreciated. Thanks!

 

Looks best in full-screen HD.

 

 

 

post #2 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post


Looks best in full-screen HD.


Yep. Brings out the pants. beercheer.gif

 

post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublediamond223 View Post

Instead of studying for finals, I thought I would assemble a carving video from last season. I figured it would be a good way for everyone to dust off the MA cobwebs for the new season.

The skier: 205 lb, 23 years old, ex-racer. 
Equipment: Nordica Dobermann Aggressor 130 boots, old Nordica Dobermann SLR 165s with marker plate + binders

Location/Conditions : Easter weekend at Arapahoe Basin, mid-winter conditions though. Very soft freshly groomed snow. 

My goal for this video was powerful, smooth, arc-to-arc SL-style turns. My specific focus was to implement a flexed transition and work on earlier tipping in the high-c portion of the turn for earlier engagement, as I had been lacking all of that previously. As a consequence of these changes, I sometimes wind up in the back seat, but I think it is coming along well overall.

Any comments are appreciated. Thanks!

Looks best in full-screen HD.





Overall your skiing is good, but I think there are some easy fixes that could really bring it to the next level. First of all there is some hip dumping going on. Try to concentrate on lifting the inside hip socket as the turn progresses. Keep lifting it until you lighten the inside foot. For drilling you can lift the hip until the inside ski comes off the ground.

Another thing you can try, which is minor, is to be a bit more patient and relaxed with the retraction, just relax the outside leg. Nothing really wrong with your current one, bur for recreational skiing it looks a bit forced
post #4 of 18

Good advice Jamt.

lifting the inside hip socket as the turn progresses.

 

Is he doing a park/ride? Lifting inside Hip will progress his balance over the skis and help move the CoM down the hill.

post #5 of 18

Not so much park and ride, but too much weight on inside which gives him trouble at times. In particular towards the end :-)

post #6 of 18

Nice tracks at 10 seconds - you should ask Andy Rooney if he's "ever wondered why" the distance between the skis varies at the spots they do. This is an awesome demonstration of retraction turn initiation. You're going to end up in the back seat occasionally if you never have (Barnes will kill me for this) "forward" movement at turn initiation. Okay so it's not exactly forward, but it's more forward than just sucking up your feet and then jamming them over to the other side. Nothing wrong with this technique. It's just more tiring and more difficult to be precise on the groomers. But you are carving and you do have the slopes to yourself. Sweet!

post #7 of 18

your hips are low and back and matching the skis instead of matching the hill.

 

I think a focus of moving your inside hip up and forward will not only let you keep more balance on your outside ski but will also soften up the inside ski which is doing far to much in these turns than it needs to be doing. The forward should bring you more countered to the hill which is going to let you finish your turn stronger and start your next turn even better.

 

There some other minor things as well mostly in timing with your extension movements as your come into the fall line but that could all go away with driving you inside hip forward.

 

 

post #8 of 18

You're definitely in the back seat. Um...we've been doing some drills on my race team to change this stuff up...it's kind of complicated, so let me think about how to word this...

post #9 of 18

Stationary foot pull-back.

 

Tail lifts in transition.

 

Foot push-back in transition.

 

Inside-Tip-Down Javelins.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Think about it...

 

 

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

 

Foot push-back in transition.


Please explain Foot PUSH back th_dunno-1[1].gif ?

 

Thanks,

JF

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post


Please explain Foot PUSH back th_dunno-1%5B1%5D.gif ?

 

Thanks,

JF



It is a drill - like a shuffle in transition. Intended to be done during the transition between long c-shaped arcs on flat terrain. Push forward; pull back; then push your feet behind you as you tip into the new turn. Will teach a skier how to find the front of the ski VERY early in the turn as well as giving them a feel for where their feet could be at any point during the transition and how to get the feet back under them by the next turn. The key is to move the feet, not lever the upper body.

 

The point in my previous post is that with those three drills you've covered how to stay forward through an entire turn.

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

It is a drill - like a shuffle in transition. Intended to be done during the transition between long c-shaped arcs on flat terrain. Push forward; pull back; then push your feet behind you as you tip into the new turn. Will teach a skier how to find the front of the ski VERY early in the turn as well as giving them a feel for where their feet could be at any point during the transition and how to get the feet back under them by the next turn. The key is to move the feet, not lever the upper body.

 

The point in my previous post is that with those three drills you've covered how to stay forward through an entire turn.


Gotcha, thanks.

JF

 

 

post #13 of 18


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamt View Post

Not so much park and ride, but too much weight on inside which gives him trouble at times. In particular towards the end :-)


icon14.gif

 

That matches my own observation as well.  

 

DD, if you can get some more outside ski dominance happening and then during your transitions incorporate a weight transfer in addition to the tipping and flexing you are doing.  This will help you get earlier edge engagement.  Your COM is having a hard time moving across from the inside of the last turn to the next.  That's why you get a little stuck in the backseat because you end up lingering in transition float a little too long. After that you end up pushing the heels a bit trying to catch up with the turn.

 

 

 

 

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

Stationary foot pull-back.

 

Tail lifts in transition.

 

Foot push-back in transition.

 

Inside-Tip-Down Javelins.

 

 

Think about it...

 

 


Great drills for helping the forward element in the crossover (crossunder?)! 

 

I personally never liked the impression that retraction/extension was purely a transitionary movement which seems to be what you're performing from what I can observe. 

 

Retraction/ extension is more a pressure control skill. Pressure builds up after the fall line and has to be managed progressively. Retraction/absorption movements can and may need to happen immediately after the fall line. Not just in the transition stage. In terms of external pressures, it should feel the same to the skier from the start of the turn to the end of the turn. (hence the term pressure control).

 

While it will certainly help to perform drills to get you more forward after the transition, Having to convert that much pressure in such a short space of time will always 'throw' you a bit back.

 

 

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gigatoh View Post


Great drills for helping the forward element in the crossover (crossunder?)! 

 

I personally never liked the impression that retraction/extension was purely a transitionary movement which seems to be what you're performing from what I can observe. 

 

Retraction/ extension is more a pressure control skill. Pressure builds up after the fall line and has to be managed progressively. Retraction/absorption movements can and may need to happen immediately after the fall line. Not just in the transition stage. In terms of external pressures, it should feel the same to the skier from the start of the turn to the end of the turn. (hence the term pressure control).

 

While it will certainly help to perform drills to get you more forward after the transition, Having to convert that much pressure in such a short space of time will always 'throw' you a bit back.

 

 


Right on about flexing to release a turn being about pressure control. Yes it creates the "transition" but the bigger point is that it releases the turn by reducing pressure on the stance ski. That whole topic is probably beyond this particular MA, but you're definitely right on target with your assessment.

 

post #16 of 18

As everyone is saying, you're "sitting" a little too much (too crouched, ass is back) in the transition.  A great example of this can bee seen at :47, 1:03, and 1:31 to name a few.

post #17 of 18

Does captain obvious make his way to Holimont?

post #18 of 18

LOL if you are referring to me than yes I do, only once or twice though.  I do most of my skiing up there at Holiday.

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