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Should I get Ski poles.

Poll Results: Should I use ski poles for general all mountain and freestyle

 
  • 100% (13)
    yes
  • 0% (0)
    no
13 Total Votes  
post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

 

Hi there

 

I'm a long time skiier, and i've been snowboarding the last few years too. I have a lovely set of salomon crossmax 120cm, which are great for messing about on, but I've just ordered some 170cm Kung fujas as I want to have something a bit more suited to jumping about, hitting powder and playing in general. I have never used ski poles as I'm usually always holding a video camera in my hands too!

 

Does anyone have any advantages of using ski poles whilst doing freestyle tricks? I can only think I'd use them to give myself a little push, as soon as I'm skiing I think they'll just be in the way...

post #2 of 21
Yes. Learn to pole plant.
post #3 of 21

One of our ski house mates doesn't ski with poles. He flops around in the bumps, throwing his arms every which way. He skis well on the groomers but not with good body position and skills.

 

When you give him poles, he stands up, puts his hands out in front, and shows good form. Then after he skis that run and gives back the poles, he say's see I don't need them.

 

Pole help with timing in the bumps and making turns with letting the bones carry the body mass not your muscles.

 

99.9% of the skiing population uses them, there must be a reason way.

post #4 of 21
Even park rats use poles, just really short ones.
post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 

This is precisely why I asked, I thought I'd see if anyone said, nah dont worry about it, you dont need them... well I shall pop them on my shopping list.

 

Is there any type of pole I should look for, or just get any keeping a 90 degree angle on the elbow..

 

Cheers for the quick replies, isnt "Park rats" a little harsh? or is this fond critisism.

post #6 of 21
Depends on your preference. Going for a good 90 on the elbow is starting point but you might find overly long poles more difficult. I would go a little shorter cause you're not used to them.

Sometimes I'm harsh on park rats. It's the pants at the ankles and overly sized jackets I laugh at. Ever see the movie "mall rats", same thing.
Edited by huhh - 12/14/11 at 12:17pm
post #7 of 21

It's a pretty common expression and I don't really see it as that negative, considering I've heard many skiers refer to themselves as park rats.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by PushKitingDave View Post

 

Cheers for the quick replies, isnt "Park rats" a little harsh? or is this fond critisism.



 

post #8 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

 

Pole help with timing in the bumps and making turns with letting the bones carry the body mass not your muscles.

 

99.9% of the skiing population uses them, there must be a reason way.



Also useful to fend off snowboarders. biggrin.gif

 

post #9 of 21

Ski poles also help you tow your snowboarding buddies across the flat spots.

post #10 of 21
Thread Starter 

Yeah mall rats is a funny film, not watched it in a while, but it made me smile! 

 

with regards to the poles, I can hire them out there, I might try a few different sizes and see what happens, buy my own next year instead.

 

I dont mind the term park rats, my dad says when im not snowboarding im not allowed to be nice to snowboarders and this year i'm swapping in my snowboard for skis.

 

incidently, if anyone wants my old snowboard, its last years Ride Antic with about 2 scratches on it, also got the Ride Rx bindings with it. Its a sweet board but if im getting ski's I want to spend a few years playing on them and I wont otherwise use the board.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200687676333&ssPageName=ADME:X:AAQ:GB:1123#ht_749wt_1185

and more photos are on my website http://www.pushkiting.co.uk

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Depends on your preference. Going for a good 90 on the elbow is starting point but you might find overly long poles more difficult. I would go a little shorter cause you're not used to them.
Sometimes I'm harsh on park rats. It's the pants at the ankles and overly sized jackets I laugh at. Ever see the movie "mall rats", same thing.


 

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post

Ski poles also help you tow your snowboarding buddies across the flat spots.



Sometimes you have way to many snowboard friends, do it once and they always want help...

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post



Sometimes you have way to many snowboard friends, do it once and they always want help...



And since you're a good friend you do it.  Every single time.

 

post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Depends on your preference. Going for a good 90 on the elbow is starting point but you might find overly long poles more difficult. I would go a little shorter cause you're not used to them.

I don't buy this advice. Get poles the right size. The only people I know with an excuse for shorter poles are 1) bump skiers - if you want to plant your pole on the bump, it is nice to have a pole 3-4cm shorter than optimal, and 2) park rats - their excuse - and it makes sense to me - is that short poles don't get hung up when skiing/jumping/landing switch. If you're going to get shorty poles, you also need saggy pants and a tall tee.

 

Go ahead and hire (we call it rent) poles to determine size. But basically you want to grab the upside down pole just under the basket and have a 90 degree bend in your elbow with the grip on the ground and your elbow at your side.

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by PushKitingDave View Post
my dad says when im not snowboarding im not allowed to be nice to snowboarders


It's good to see that the passage of family values to progeny remains alive and well...

 

 

post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 

We'll I will be trying to land switch and jumping in general, i'll try it all on powder first and see what happens!

post #16 of 21

Yes.

post #17 of 21
Some people learn better with somewhat shorter poles (2-4cm), forces them forward out of the back seat.
post #18 of 21

/\/\ I don't agree with that. I find it makes them hunch over, which in turn pushes their ass out the back and ultimately keeps their COM in the back. I've found my own skiing improved when I went from 48" to 50" poles. The 48" ones were great when I was a bump skier in my teens and 20's.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by huhh View Post

Some people learn better with somewhat shorter poles (2-4cm), forces them forward out of the back seat.


Shorter poles can help more than just backseat bandits; anyone who skis in too "long" of a body position can benefit from skiing with shorter poles--as long as the skier has the right focus. Someone with poor pole technique who's given a shorter pole will simply plant in the wrong location and ski with either droopy hands or baskets dangling in the air. So it's a tool that needs to be coached properly. 

post #20 of 21

Park rats, is a term for people who do park.  It's not offensive.

 

Poles are important as they help not only form, but balance and timing.  When buying poles, turn the pole upside down, grip the pole under the basket and you want your arm to be at a 90 degree angle.  The basket is the round plastic thing on the end.

post #21 of 21

If money isn't too much of an issue (won't be cheap during season), another option would be to get a pair with adjustable length. Leki sells one (with clip-on straps). They work great.

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