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thoughts on "blades"

post #1 of 60
Thread Starter 

What are your thoughts on "blades"?  Two of my kids have them and want to bring them to Beaver Creek.  They said they are fun, and somedays, they just like to mix it up with their skis.  I've never used them so I really don't know much about them. I didn't buy them; they got them from their step-parent.  One child (well really adult, age 21) is an expert skier already, but my other child (14), is intermediate/advance stage.  Will it affect her skiing or should I just let her have fun and use them some on our ski trip, since that's what this vacation is supposed to be about anyway?

 

Thoughts?

 

Christine

post #2 of 60

Blades are an excellent tool for improving technique. They force you into the proper position.

post #3 of 60

My son bought snowblades when he was about 15.  He actually learned to carve those babies, leaving parallel tracks in the snow.  When we were at Snowmass, I wanted to go do some runs off the Cirque headwall.  He said he'd go along.  At the top of the poma, a couple of guys really laid into him (and me) telling him he was way out of his league, etc. etc.  About five minutes later, my son elegantly carved past one of them yard-saled on the bumps and flailing. 

He's skiing now, but I'm convince the experience he got on the blades actually benefitted him in terms of edging power, weight management, and balance.

 

Bottom line: regardless of their skill, let your kids take 'em along.  If they work out -- fine.  If not, your kids will get that quickly too.  It's supposed to be FUN.

post #4 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin Sadler View Post

Blades are an excellent tool for improving technique. They force you into the proper position.



Really? I have never seen someone on snowblades who wasn't eternally in the back seat.

post #5 of 60
Blades use tends to result in a lot of body rotation unless you specifically carve on 'em all the time. They're so easy to turn it becomes addictive to rotate slightly. If that carries over to regular ski use, it becomes limiting.
post #6 of 60
I only see out of control snowbladers, rarely I see someone that knows how to carve them at speed. I would prefer a short SL ski over blades any day.
post #7 of 60

I still have my Line ski boards although today even Line would not admit they ever made any. :D

 

I loved skiing on them. If you know how to ski they can be a blast. Too bad they got a bad rap, but only because too many clueless people use them. 

post #8 of 60

My inline skate coach, who's also CSIA level 3 certified, uses snowblades to transition inline skaters to skiing. In the hands of a proper coach, snowblades are an excellent tool. They require a centered stance, and enable an accelerated learning path towards edging skills (if properly taught). 

 

There's nothing inherently harmful technique-wise about snowblades--no moreso than regular skis anyway. You may even find an instructor who's competent at teaching on snowblades up there who can take advantage of the snowblades to develop technique. (Anything's possible. Though most instructors have no idea how to teach on snowblades.) If her brother's a good carver on snowblades, she could get some benefit just from trying to follow in his tracks on an easy run, doing rollerblade turns. 

 

I think it's important to look for releasable bindings on the snowblades though. A boot-top fracture would be horrible!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Really? I have never seen someone on snowblades who wasn't eternally in the back seat.


There's a limit to how far in the backseat a skier can be with a 25cm tail.

 

Let's not hold snowbladers to a higher standard than recreational skiers. The average rec skier is constantly either in the backseat or crushing the front of the boot. 

post #9 of 60

I have a pair of blades but I haven't used them in five years... I'm not sure why I'd personally want to.  I do think they might help balance, but I don't know.

 

Like someone said above... they are so short that they do not even turn like normal skis.

post #10 of 60

Prohibiting them from bringing them would be rather silly. Then again, making fun of them for using them isn't out of the realm of possibility, either devil.gif. In all seriousness, snowblades can be a good training tool, as mentioned. But a legitimate mode of sliding, not really. If for no other reason than the fact that they are no longer made. At some point, those snowblades are going to wear out, and your kids are going to have to switch exclusively to skis. So don't prohibit them from using the blades... but make sure they spend time on their skis too.

post #11 of 60

Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

In all seriousness, snowblades can be a good training tool, as mentioned. But a legitimate mode of sliding, not really. If for no other reason than the fact that they are no longer made. 

 

Snowblading is alive and kicking. You'll just find the products under the name of skiboards. Our local skateshop recently got into selling skiboards: http://www.shop-task.com/Ski_Boards_and_Bindings_s/270.htm

 

There's no indication that revel8 will stop making skiboards (snowblades) anytime soon. 

 

That said, the OP's daughter may be interested in the benefits of skis after a while: easier to balance on, different skis make it easier to handle different conditions and terrain, different performance levels from different skis... if it's really an issue, there are ways to handle it with carrots (versus sticks :)

post #12 of 60

Safety point of view.  Blades without release bindings have a tendency to fracture the Tibia (large bone below the knee.  In 15 years of patrolling the only Tibia fractures I have seen have all been on blades.  Modern skis with toe/heel release with high boots no longer fracture Tibia's very often.   I have read some other research data on blades that has suggested the same results.   Best to get blades with release bindings. 

post #13 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post

Safety point of view.  Blades without release bindings have a tendency to fracture the Tibia (large bone below the knee.  In 15 years of patrolling the only Tibia fractures I have seen have all been on blades.  Modern skis with toe/heel release with high boots no longer fracture Tibia's very often.   I have read some other research data on blades that has suggested the same results.   Best to get blades with release bindings. 


Quite a few years ago (helping out on a new years day) I transported 3 pre teens with what turned out to be spiral Tib fractures in a span of maybe 4 hours, all on blades. It is odd that since that day, I can't recall another one.

 

For a ski vacation quite a ways from home, I'd re think the blades for the younger one anyway. 
 

 

post #14 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


There's nothing inherently harmful technique-wise about snowblades--no moreso than regular skis anyway.



Controllably pressuring the tips then transferring that pressure rearward along the ski is simply unpossible to learn on snowblades.

post #15 of 60

As other said, they are a good learning tool. The kids had them back in late 90's for a season. I tried them a couple of times, yes you find your balance really quick. I didn't care for them, but it does help your stay centered. If she wants to bring them that's fine, As long as she brings her real skis too.

 

 

post #16 of 60

I've got a set of blades - I use them only if I'm stuck on a flat hill with beginner/intermediates and only groomers to play on.  I don't use my poles with them.  It makes things somewhat more interesting for up to a half day.  But they are useless in powder, moguls, and jumps, don't take speed very well, and you have to keep them constantly on edge to prevent squirrellyness.  I would put them on the shelf marked "toys" and not "teaching tools".

post #17 of 60

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 

Snowblading is alive and kicking. You'll just find the products under the name of skiboards. Our local skateshop recently got into selling skiboards: http://www.shop-task.com/Ski_Boards_and_Bindings_s/270.htm

 

There's no indication that revel8 will stop making skiboards (snowblades) anytime soon. 

 

That said, the OP's daughter may be interested in the benefits of skis after a while: easier to balance on, different skis make it easier to handle different conditions and terrain, different performance levels from different skis... if it's really an issue, there are ways to handle it with carrots (versus sticks :)



Metaphor, you are so right. Skiboarding has progressed a tremendous amount the past 5 years. Here's a decent write up.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skiboarding 

 

With a turn radius of about 7M they are the easiest turning thing on the mountain.

 

The older snowblades suck at higher speeds because they chatter so much. But, the modern skiboards are very stable at high speeds.

 

For flotation in powder Spruce makes a 130cm model called Sherpa's that handle powder easily. Revel8 this year has released a model with the same surface area as the Sherpas in a shorter wider form factor that added in Rocker, called Rockered Condors.

 

Skiboards with releasable bindings are no more inherantly dangerous than long skis with releasable bindings. 

 

With the general decline in outdoor activity participation, I don't understand the haters. They remind me of the snowboard haters when they first came out. I think everyone that has the intestinal fortitude to get out there should be encouraged, not hated on.

post #18 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortydude View Post


With the general decline in outdoor activity participation,

 

I wasn't aware of this.  Where did you learn this information?

 

If that's true, that's not a good thing.

 

I still thought there were more people who ski in this country than there are people living in Switzerland and Austria, combined.  Sorry, that has nothing to do with the thread.

 

 

 

Anyway, this thread has drummed up some renewed interest for me.  The only problem is I have Solomon Snowblades (I think the original model, or one of the early ones from ~2000), they don't have releasable bindings, and apparently aren't good at speed.  The edges are rusted, and MAN those things need a tune.

post #19 of 60

I love snow blades, instant fun for anyone, you cant get up the speed, jump quite as well etc but they are a lot of fun, we spend some time on them some years and they'll be 10 of us racing through the trees or carving down the slope, I can ski on one blade backwards carving, and have since transferred the spins, carving, backwards skiing to full length skis. 

My blades are 120cm so the longer type, anything 70cmish gets a bit too sketchy. my wife uses a set which are 100cm and loves them.

 

If you want to be a professional then don't bother. If you want to have instant fun, be able to grind anything, spin on a 6 pence, be able to take on any slope with no fear then strap on a pair..

 

of blades.

post #20 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

 

Anyway, this thread has drummed up some renewed interest for me.



I just mounted up some old Fischer Spyders with Voile tele bindings.

post #21 of 60

Solomon crossmax 120cm, cant recomend highly enough, I rarely have ppl overtake me I can keep the speed up so well, my old 79cm set where very hard to stop the speed wobble. and still small enough to do anything on
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

 

I wasn't aware of this.  Where did you learn this information?

 

If that's true, that's not a good thing.

 

I still thought there were more people who ski in this country than there are people living in Switzerland and Austria, combined.  Sorry, that has nothing to do with the thread.

 

 

 

Anyway, this thread has drummed up some renewed interest for me.  The only problem is I have Solomon Snowblades (I think the original model, or one of the early ones from ~2000), they don't have releasable bindings, and apparently aren't good at speed.  The edges are rusted, and MAN those things need a tune.



 

post #22 of 60

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by shortydude View Post

 

With the general decline in outdoor activity participation,



While I can't really speak to other outdoor activities, this is not true for skiing and snowboarding in the US. According to NSAA figures, last season ('10/'11) was the biggest season ever in the American snowsports industry, with more skier visits than any previous year recorded. And that was breaking the previous season's record. Which broke the 2007 record. While skier visits were flat for about 20 years, over the last decade, they has been a significant upward trend in participation in snowsports.

 

post #23 of 60

Vitamin Ski: Like someone said above... they are so short that they do not even turn like normal skis.

 

You turn skis differently depending on length?

post #24 of 60


 

The people that ski are going skiing as often as they can while they can, that's true. But, I know of a dozen ski clubs that have lost half the size they they were ten years ago. There are fewer and fewer new people getting into outdoor activities. I know of several mom & pop sporting good stores that have had to downsize dramaticly because of it. Those shop owners I've talked to blame the influence of digital electronics changing the culture, lack of physical activity, obesity it's all tied together. 

 



Quote:

Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

 



While I can't really speak to other outdoor activities, this is not true for skiing and snowboarding in the US. According to NSAA figures, last season ('10/'11) was the biggest season ever in the American snowsports industry, with more skier visits than any previous year recorded. And that was breaking the previous season's record. Which broke the 2007 record. While skier visits were flat for about 20 years, over the last decade, they has been a significant upward trend in participation in snowsports.

 



 

post #25 of 60

Make sure they learn to stick uphill ice on them.

 

saucerboyteezoom_1.jpg

post #26 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post

Vitamin Ski: Like someone said above... they are so short that they do not even turn like normal skis.

 

You turn skis differently depending on length?



 

Well HOW you turn them may be different

post #27 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post





 

Well HOW you turn them may be different



 

 

No, you use the same technique ... but I would have expected you to know that!

post #28 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post



 

 

No, you use the same technique ... but I would have expected you to know that!



No, you don't.  You can swing your legs around in circular motions with blades so short and achieve different turning technique than is possible with longer skis.  

 

I expect you know there are multiple ways to turn a ski.

post #29 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



No, you don't.  You can swing your legs around in circular motions with blades so short and achieve different turning technique than is possible with longer skis.  

 

I expect you know there are multiple ways to turn a ski.


So the lower body leads the turning effort, you're tipping your skis high on edge and applying some steering while staying centered over the ski? 

 

That sounds like a dynamic short radius turn!

post #30 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post


So the lower body leads the turning effort, you're tipping your skis high on edge and applying some steering while staying centered over the ski? 

 

That sounds like a dynamic short radius turn!



I guess blades are golden then.  I'm gonna get a stone grind on mine, and lube it up with RaceWax T-series.

 

Woo Hoo

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