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Waxing my skis.

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

 

Hi, im new, and have an inquiry about waxing my skis.

Im getting into ski racing for the first time, i have two sets of skis (volkl kendo 177, rossignol 165 bandits,) and i just got both of them waxed for the first few races

It costs too much to keep doing it, how much would it cost to do it my self, and how would i go about doing this, tuning it up and waxing this.

Sorry i didnt search the forum or anything. i just posted.

-Thanks much
Chris

post #2 of 23

Hi.

 

You can go to www.racewax.com and check out prices.

 

At the bare minimum, you will need an iron, a plastic scraper, a bronze brush, a nylon brush, and fiberlene paper, and a LARGE amount of hydrocarbon wax.

 

You can look at the prices; they are relatively cheap but realize that there will be an upfront cost to buy all the equipment... it is only after this investment and over time that it really pays off--and it certainly will.

 

 

Search "How to wax skis" on youtube for instructions, but here's the cliffs:

 

1.  Set wax iron to correct temp listen on wax (usually 135ish)

 

2.  Hold wax up to iron and drip on skis lengthwise in criss-cross motion.

 

3.  Spread out liquid wax with iron to cover base of skis.

 

4.  Let dry 20 minutes.

 

5.  Scrape excess wax completely tip-to-tail

 

6.  Brush with a bronze brush tip-to-tail very well.

 

7.  Brush with a nylon brush very well tip-to-tail

 

8.  Make a pass with fiberlene.

 

 

GO SKIING!

 

 

(Fair warning:  This is extremely "messy," and wax shavings will be everywhere)

 

 

post #3 of 23

Lordsteezus, you do have another option, which is to buy paste-on liquid F4 wax from SWIX.  

 

It may end up being more expensive per-use, but overall relatively cheap.  Also, it does not require any additional equipment, and is very simple (though also messy and gross in it's own way... and quite frankly the exposure to the solvents in the liquid wax is not insignificant).

post #4 of 23
Well, LordSteezus, waxing is just one part of keeping your skis in good race tune. If you're getting into racing, it would be well worth your while to learn to give your skis a full tune yourself. As you advance, you'll get pickier about just exactly how they are tuned, and unless you find a shop and a particular tuner who you really trust, you'll always be your own best tuner. And few things will give you confidence like knowing your skis are tuned just the way you like.

It is not difficult--you can learn the basics from a book or a video, although having someone actually show you and guide you through it the first time or two would surely be nice. Developing a good touch comes with practice.

You'll need a few basic tools, and it can get extensive--and expensive, if you really get into it. But an investment in good tools will last a very long time if you use them properly and care for them. Files, diamond stones, brushes, file guides, scapers, a good iron, and a selection of waxes, along with a vise and a bench and a box to keep it all together--it can add up.

But you can start small and work up as you develop skill and interest. If you get your skis well-tuned by a good shop, you can maintain the edges reasonably well with just a diamond stone, if you do it regularly. Most serious racers would never consider anything but a good hot wax on race day, but for the casual racer or recreational skier, you can get by pretty well with a daily application of rub-on wax. If you don't damage your skis, stoning your edges and rubbing on a little wax won't take you more than five minutes each day, and it will be way better than nothing--and better than having a full-on race tune only once-in-a-while.

But really--as a racer, you're going to want more, sometime. I'll bet Slidewright has some ideas for you, and he'll be glad to sell you everything you need. (And he'll give you a discount if you become a supporter of EpicSki). His website also has some good basic tuning information and videos to learn from. There's lots of skillful people here at EpicSki who can help you learn to tune well--but remember, it's the Internet, so you're bound to get some questionable advice as well. Don't hesitate to ask specific questions as they come up.

Welcome to EpicSki!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #5 of 23

The quick overview from VS was not bad. If you are racing you will want to pick the right wax temperature specific waxes to start with. Lots of discussions on the virtues of various formulas, brands, etc. Choices include fluros (repel water) and molys (repel dirt and give good glide in cold temperatures) as well as hydrocarbons and all sorts of combinations. I try to leave my wax on overnight if possible before scraping and brushing. The brushing routine can include lots more than 2 brushes. But 2 work to start with. Bob Barnes' recommendation on full maintenance in terms of up front investment was correct. However, that investment is cheaper by at least a factor of 4 then having a shop do comparable work over the course of 2 or 3 winters. And that presumes you can find a shop that will do a consistently good job for you that is convenient to where you live or ski. Dissatisfaction with the quality of the edge work by my local shops caused me to make the initial investment. And if you buy good tools, your equipment will last for many many years.(e.g., we probably did 50 pair of skis, waxes and edge work last winter, I used mostly wax I had and the only purchase I can recall was a big bar of a moly wax late in the season for something like $40 on sale) 

 

In terms of techniques, Jacques posted a video series here not too long ago that goes through the process. And there are dozens (hundreds?) of discussions on what you should have to be set up for maintenance.


Edited by vsirin - 12/10/11 at 7:01pm
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Hi.

 

You can go to www.racewax.com and check out prices.

 

At the bare minimum, you will need an iron, a plastic scraper, a bronze brush, a nylon brush, and fiberlene paper, and a LARGE amount of hydrocarbon wax.

 

You can look at the prices; they are relatively cheap but realize that there will be an upfront cost to buy all the equipment... it is only after this investment and over time that it really pays off--and it certainly will.

 

 

Search "How to wax skis" on youtube for instructions, but here's the cliffs:

 

1.  Set wax iron to correct temp listen on wax (usually 135ish)

 

2.  Hold wax up to iron and drip on skis lengthwise in criss-cross motion.

 

3.  Spread out liquid wax with iron to cover base of skis.

 

4.  Let dry 20 minutes.

 

5.  Scrape excess wax completely tip-to-tail

 

6.  Brush with a bronze brush tip-to-tail very well.

 

7.  Brush with a nylon brush very well tip-to-tail

 

8.  Make a pass with fiberlene.

 

 

GO SKIING!

 

 

(Fair warning:  This is extremely "messy," and wax shavings will be everywhere)

 

 


 

 

Thanks, I have a  kit from my dad that has scrapers, ptex, wax, and such. (the wax is Toko, red, silver, orange (red being coldest orange being wet)
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Lordsteezus, you do have another option, which is to buy paste-on liquid F4 wax from SWIX.  

 

It may end up being more expensive per-use, but overall relatively cheap.  Also, it does not require any additional equipment, and is very simple (though also messy and gross in it's own way... and quite frankly the exposure to the solvents in the liquid wax is not insignificant).


 

I think im going to stick with hot wax


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes View Post

Well, LordSteezus, waxing is just one part of keeping your skis in good race tune. If you're getting into racing, it would be well worth your while to learn to give your skis a full tune yourself. As you advance, you'll get pickier about just exactly how they are tuned, and unless you find a shop and a particular tuner who you really trust, you'll always be your own best tuner. And few things will give you confidence like knowing your skis are tuned just the way you like.
It is not difficult--you can learn the basics from a book or a video, although having someone actually show you and guide you through it the first time or two would surely be nice. Developing a good touch comes with practice.
You'll need a few basic tools, and it can get extensive--and expensive, if you really get into it. But an investment in good tools will last a very long time if you use them properly and care for them. Files, diamond stones, brushes, file guides, scapers, a good iron, and a selection of waxes, along with a vise and a bench and a box to keep it all together--it can add up.
But you can start small and work up as you develop skill and interest. If you get your skis well-tuned by a good shop, you can maintain the edges reasonably well with just a diamond stone, if you do it regularly. Most serious racers would never consider anything but a good hot wax on race day, but for the casual racer or recreational skier, you can get by pretty well with a daily application of rub-on wax. If you don't damage your skis, stoning your edges and rubbing on a little wax won't take you more than five minutes each day, and it will be way better than nothing--and better than having a full-on race tune only once-in-a-while.
But really--as a racer, you're going to want more, sometime. I'll bet Slidewright has some ideas for you, and he'll be glad to sell you everything you need. (And he'll give you a discount if you become a supporter of EpicSki). His website also has some good basic tuning information and videos to learn from. There's lots of skillful people here at EpicSki who can help you learn to tune well--but remember, it's the Internet, so you're bound to get some questionable advice as well. Don't hesitate to ask specific questions as they come up.
Welcome to EpicSki!
Best regards,
Bob Barnes

Website is broken, but anways yeah, i think it will be the best bet for me to do it myself.


 

 

post #7 of 23

Make friends with your local backroom guy, offer to buy him a case of beer and pizza if he'll take the time and teach you how to tune on your skis.

Many years ago I did just that with my local tech, and he spent the better part of an evening teaching me the finer points of hand tuning my skis. It was worth every penny.

 

Mike

post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 

So whats the deal with mineral spirits? can i use  it to remove things from skis?

post #9 of 23

If you choose to use mineral spirit type base cleaner, make sure to use it sparingly.  Too much can dry up a base.  Also use gloves with it since it can be toxic.

 

Most repair shops have gone towards the citrus type base cleaners.  They are non-toxic.  Still use this type sparingly, but it doesn't have as much drying out effect as mineral spirit type cleaners.

 

If you do not want to use base cleaners, you can always learn how to hot scrape your bases.  Do a search on the topic.  It is in the forum somewhere.

 

Dennis

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Denny1969 View Post

If you choose to use mineral spirit type base cleaner, make sure to use it sparingly.  Too much can dry up a base.  Also use gloves with it since it can be toxic.

 

Most repair shops have gone towards the citrus type base cleaners.  They are non-toxic.  Still use this type sparingly, but it doesn't have as much drying out effect as mineral spirit type cleaners.

 

If you do not want to use base cleaners, you can always learn how to hot scrape your bases.  Do a search on the topic.  It is in the forum somewhere.

 

Dennis


QFT.

 

 

I always use this method.  Doing so utilizes the wax itself as a non-polar solvent.  The "wax" CH chains are much longer than many hydrocarbon solvents, however the high temperature imparted during heating increases the solvent power of the wax and should take up most "gunk."

 

I personally try to stay away from chemicals except when absolutely necessary.

 

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post


QFT.

 

 

I always use this method.  Doing so utilizes the wax itself as a non-polar solvent.  The "wax" CH chains are much longer than many hydrocarbon solvents, however the high temperature imparted during heating increases the solvent power of the wax and should take up most "gunk."

 

I personally try to stay away from chemicals except when absolutely necessary.

 



Highly understandable. Where do you guys get your wax, cause $13 is kickin my ass.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Raatz View Post



Highly understandable. Where do you guys get your wax, cause $13 is kickin my ass.



This is where I shop... I can't guarantee it is the lowest price, but you get a whole lot of wax for somewhat reasonable money.  300g should last quite a while.

 

http://www.racewax.com/c=6ed8Dp9G1K3BGAQ44c2lpje4G/category/ski-and-snowboard-wax.70-base-prep-hydrocarbon-wax/

post #13 of 23

Shop your local ski shop and save the high cost of shipping.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Raatz View Post





Highly understandable. Where do you guys get your wax, cause $13 is kickin my ass.



 

 

 

post #14 of 23

Racewax has a discount for supporters AND at orders over $30 they ship free.  I usually buy enough wax in one go to make $30.  Needless to say they have lots of other stuff you may need as well.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer View Post

Shop your local ski shop and save the high cost of shipping.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Raatz View Post





Highly understandable. Where do you guys get your wax, cause $13 is kickin my ass.



 

 

 



 

post #15 of 23

The only thing we will go through a lot of is the base wax. There is still no need to over-drench your base, particularly race skis because they are so easy to work with. Stock up on HC during off season. For the top coat, a bar can last you a long time if you do it right.

post #16 of 23

From what I've learned about waxing over the years, I would tell you to just buy some good All temp wax like Dominator Hyperzoom. until you get more into racing and get race skis. Don't spend a lot of money on expensive wax until you learn the skills to be at the top of the race game.

 

I dont race but my son did years ago, I got into tuning during the late 90's. I have enough left over race wax from years that I just mix in little high flouro for the day's when the snow is really cold or warm.

 

You don't need perfect bases, don't fall into that trap, flat bases, wax and sharp edges are more important, if you spend to much time getting the bases flat all the time you take out wax. Learn the balance.

 

Until your one of the top 3 or 4 guy's just have fun with it and don't worry about which wax you have to try and beat the fastest guy.

 

BTW, you have two good all mountain skis there, I enjoy my Kendo's in the woods and bumps as well as fresh snow. They would not be my first choice for a race ski.

 

 

 

 

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



This is where I shop... I can't guarantee it is the lowest price, but you get a whole lot of wax for somewhat reasonable money.  300g should last quite a while.

 

http://www.racewax.com/c=6ed8Dp9G1K3BGAQ44c2lpje4G/category/ski-and-snowboard-wax.70-base-prep-hydrocarbon-wax/



THANK YOU SWEET JESUS



Quote:
Originally Posted by Racer View Post

Shop your local ski shop and save the high cost of shipping.
 



 

 

 



Thats my local shop for ya >.>


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Racewax has a discount for supporters AND at orders over $30 they ship free.  I usually buy enough wax in one go to make $30.  Needless to say they have lots of other stuff you may need as well.  
 



 


How does one become a "supporter"

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post

The only thing we will go through a lot of is the base wax. There is still no need to over-drench your base, particularly race skis because they are so easy to work with. Stock up on HC during off season. For the top coat, a bar can last you a long time if you do it right.



Base wax? i dont use anything to make a bottom layer of wax, i scrape, clean, wipe, drip, iron, scrape, brush. 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post

From what I've learned about waxing over the years, I would tell you to just buy some good All temp wax like Dominator Hyperzoom. until you get more into racing and get race skis. Don't spend a lot of money on expensive wax until you learn the skills to be at the top of the race game.

 

I dont race but my son did years ago, I got into tuning during the late 90's. I have enough left over race wax from years that I just mix in little high flouro for the day's when the snow is really cold or warm.

 

You don't need perfect bases, don't fall into that trap, flat bases, wax and sharp edges are more important, if you spend to much time getting the bases flat all the time you take out wax. Learn the balance.

 

Until your one of the top 3 or 4 guy's just have fun with it and don't worry about which wax you have to try and beat the fastest guy.

 

BTW, you have two good all mountain skis there, I enjoy my Kendo's in the woods and bumps as well as fresh snow. They would not be my first choice for a race ski.

 

 

 

 



Thanks alot, i am the fastest guy on my team (and its my first season haha. and im on all mountain skis) so i am that top 3-4, so thats why im getting into waxing.

 

 

Thanks much guys!

post #18 of 23

To become a supporter, page up to the upper right hand corner.  Click on the button labeled "Become a Supporter".

post #19 of 23

sadly im not seeing it. whats it next to?

post #20 of 23

Are you using a smart phone or something?  Here's the link:  http://www.epicski.com/a/epicski-supporter-and-sponsor-subscription-page

post #21 of 23

Lord and Chris, where do you ski and where are you going to race?

 

Raced for 25yrs and learn the basics lst, KISS, and ease into the finer frames of waxing.  More important to learn race and ski technique than to wax perfectly.  Also your ski tune-edges etc. will probably be more important also.  Wax and the proper wax and its application and removal will be more important as your racing improves and start doing more speed events, i.e., super g's with flat spots etc.

 

Learn the basics and ease into the finer points of wax and tuning.  It eventually may become very important and yes the proper wax can make the difference in winning a race but more likely when you are learning, skiing/racing correctly etc. will matter more.

 

Good luck and good skiing.

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Base wax? i dont use anything to make a bottom layer of wax, i scrape, clean, wipe, drip, iron, scrape, brush

What I mean was base wax = your wax if you have only one coat or if you use the same wax for multiple coats. One coat works if you have a clean base to work with. Otherwise, cleanse your base by repeating drip/crayon and scrape until the wax is near clear. Then just brush to finish.

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by chanwmr View Post

What I mean was base wax = your wax if you have only one coat or if you use the same wax for multiple coats. One coat works if you have a clean base to work with. Otherwise, cleanse your base by repeating drip/crayon and scrape until the wax is near clear. Then just brush to finish.



Funny thing is, last night i hot waxed, and rubbed on some before my practice. and i was soooo fast haha.

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