EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Discussion of RayCantu blogspot post
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Discussion of RayCantu blogspot post - Page 3

post #61 of 66

If you mean my statements above, ramp angle redistributes weight-bearing to the front of the foot somewhat, and also raises the COM point vertically.  This decreases stability, and makes driving forward very easy.  But for every action is a reaction, and all that unstable forward driving will sling-shot backwards coming out of a turn and throw you into the backseat (unless you prevent this from happening).

 

If I had upright boots with less ramp, it wouldn't be as easy to throw myself forward... thus it would be harder for the setup to equally throw me backwards.

 

Of course, my theory was formed in part from reading the prejudicial views against my boot geometry in Ray's posts, all over this site, and elsewhere saying that "modern skis" don't need old-school boots

 

(and I don't mean "my" boots specifically, but forward-leaning race boots in general).

 

But surely there is a reason that race boots still are stiff with alot of forward lean?

post #62 of 66
Thread Starter 

Well we can prove this theory right or wrong!  take all the ramp out of your boots and stand the cuff straight up at 90 degrees and let us know how that works for you?

 

There are four parameters that affect our sagittal or fore/aft balance.  They are boot board ramp angle, forward lean of the boot cuff, delta angle created by the binding stand height differential, and the actual binding mount position over the sweet spot of the ski.  These four parameters must work in harmony to achieve optimum fore/aft balance while moving dynamically on our skis.  

 

Though the flex stiffness of the boot is not an angle of alignment it is also a factor in one's ability to balance effectively.  

 

Your boot should not throw you anywhere Vitaminski.  If set up properly it places you in a balanced neutral position which you can use as a reference when moving about over your skis.  From this optimum position you can apply pressure at will to the front or back of your skis without falling out of balance.  and if you do find yourself out of balance a stiffer boot will allow you to recover more quickly and re-center.  Conversely, a softer boot will require more motion to transmit the same amount of force as a stiffer boot.  Also, inaccurate movements will be punished by a stiffer boot.   As a skier develops and migrates toward a stiffer boot, proper alignment becomes more critical as a softer boot with poor alignment can be overpowered by the skier to stand where he must to balance.  A poorly aligned stiffer boot will punish rather than reward and the skier must make compensatory movements which detract from good skiing performance. 

post #63 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

If you mean my statements above, ramp angle redistributes weight-bearing to the front of the foot somewhat, and also raises the COM point vertically.  This decreases stability, and makes driving forward very easy.  But for every action is a reaction, and all that unstable forward driving will sling-shot backwards coming out of a turn and throw you into the backseat (unless you prevent this from happening).   You are just making this shit up aren't you?

 

 

If I had upright boots with less ramp, it wouldn't be as easy to throw myself forward... thus it would be harder for the setup to equally throw me backwards.

?WTF 

 

Of course, my theory was formed in part from reading the prejudicial views against my boot geometry in Ray's posts, all over this site, and elsewhere saying that "modern skis" don't need old-school boots   The statement that modern skis don't need old school boots probably comes from the fact that modern shaped skis need less forward leverage to aid carving.  We can get away with simply tipping them on edge, however; expert skiers still blend edging and tip pressure to shape turns rather than simply tipping the ski and going for a ride and still prefer stiffer flexing boots.

 

 



 

post #64 of 66


 

Quote:

Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post

 

 You are just making this shit up aren't you?

 


Actually that idea came from another epic member

 

 

post #65 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski 
If you mean my statements above, ramp angle redistributes weight-bearing to the front of the foot somewhat, and also raises the COM point vertically.
I'd agree with the basic mechanics of this much - but it's entirely unrelated to a skier's ability to "throw themselves" any particular direction. It's probably unrelated to stability also - unless you get the ramp angle up to around 40 or 50 degrees ... at which point you're so decidedly on the ball of you foot that you've reduced your stance-surface to less than a third the length of your foot. I'm thinking that would be a bit unstable... wink.gif


Hey Bud,

Based on your post (#62) ... can we say stiffer boots require a more accurate alignment to the skier's fore/aft biomechanical situation?

I'm thinking along those lines too since softer flexing boots permit the skier to make corrective movements (or assume a compensating stance) to to get around mis-alignment issues. A stiff boot would need to be pretty close to an ideal fit and alignment since the skier would have less "flexibility" in how they stand and move.

.ma
post #66 of 66
Thread Starter 

Exactly MichaelA

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Discussion of RayCantu blogspot post