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Does the design/fashion of outerwear sway your decision? - Page 2

Poll Results: Does the fashion/design of ski outerwear (e.g., snowpants, jacket, goggles, etc...) affect your decision when actually buying?

 
  • 37% (9)
    Strongly Agree
  • 37% (9)
    Agree
  • 8% (2)
    Neutral
  • 4% (1)
    Disagree
  • 12% (3)
    Strongly Disagree
24 Total Votes  
post #31 of 36

Didn't think style was that important to me, but then I remembered about the time I forgot to bring my jacket with me.  Got to the mountain reached behind my seat and realized mt Arc'terx jacket was 150 miles away on my couch.  Went into the 2 ski shops next to the mountain and explained what happened.  Both shops said I could take 1/2 off of any jacket on their sale racks. Technically some would work, but they were all so fugly I couldn't do it.  Ended up paying $400 for a jacket I knew I would use for years, rather than taking a fugly jacket for $75 that I knew I would never wear again.

post #32 of 36

Function>form, always...but form follows function so gear that works well pretty much always looks good (to me). 

post #33 of 36

I'm 6'0 and 176 lbs. I can barely find anything that fits me in a retail store, let alone ski shops. The shirts I buy have to be 'slim fit' or 'athletic cut'. How about labeling x-large clothes 'fat fit' or 'couch potato cut"?

 

I have to buy Italian cycling clothes because they are still cut (for what used to be) normal sized people.

 

 

It's very sad.

 

 

 

 


Edited by dwoof2 - 12/10/11 at 12:41pm
post #34 of 36

The poll is flawed   It asks ...

 

"Does the fashion/design of ski outerwear (e.g., snowpants, jacket, goggles, etc...) affect your decision when actually buying?"

 

The term design refers to aesthetic or functional aspect of a thing.  Fashion refers to popular style.  "Design" makes a difference for me, but not so much "fashion"    I like ski clothing that is well "designed" and look for things that I want in technical outerwear, such as durability, general fit, ease of use, the design of the snow collar, the fit of the hood and other functional things. I  also want to "look good" in what I'm wearing - I wouldn't want to wear something that looks "bad".  For example, I picked the Mammut Alyeska Jacket and pants and this year because the pants and jacket fit great, both have pockets where I want (it's important for me to have lots of easy access pockets), the snow collar of the jacket is super functional, the ventilation zippers on both the jacket and pants work well, the materials are high quality and the clothing is really well made.  It helps that the pants and jacket look good too. However, I don't look for "fashion" and I don't buy ski clothing because it is currently popular.  

 

So I answered "strongly agree" because design is important...but not fashion.

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by slopeswag View Post

I guess it's good that the 'skinny jean' trend hasn't kicked into snowpants, or we would all be screwed...


 

Actually it has.

 

http://www.trusnow.com/Volcom-VCO-Engineered-Skinny-Jean-Snowboard-Pants.asp

post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwoof2 View Post

I'm 6'0 and 176 lbs. I can barely find anything that fits me in a retail store, let alone ski shops. The shirts I buy have to be 'slim fit' or 'athletic cut'. How about labeling x-large clothes 'fat fit' or 'couch potato cut"?

 

I have to buy Italian cycling clothes because they are still cut (for what used to be) normal sized people.

 

 

It's very sad.

 

 

 

 


Not everyone who has broad shoulders and a thick chest are fat, or couch potatoes. That's like me saying they should label slime fit clothing "bird chest", or "flat ass", or how about "pencil neck".

 

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