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substitute for Fiberlene

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

Wondering if there's a substitute for Fiberlene (or similar) that can be use for hot iron passes.  I've read that you can use a paper towel, but not too keen on giving that a shot - just sounds wrong with a hot iron.  I know it's cheap, but I dont live in an area where it's  readily available.

 

thanks,

mike

post #2 of 30

Paper towel will not get caught in fire, if that's your problem. But it still won't work. It will fall apart in second, when it will touch melted wax, so unless you would be using it for fluoro powders it's more or less useless. In all those years I was in this business I didn't find anything that could substitute fiberlene... at least for this kind of usage. For cleaning skis, hot iron or anything else, normal paper towel works perfectly, but for ironing wax with "paper" between ski and iron, fiberlene is only way to go. So only substitution n is no paper at all... and this works fine for most of time :)

post #3 of 30

I've used an old cloth handkerchief. It worked fine for me. I'm also thinking that a piece of felt, the type made from recycled plastic bottles, might work well too. 

 

post #4 of 30

For base protection while ironing liquids/sprays, powders or ultra-thin solids, teflon sheets are an excellent option. They conduct heat well, slide, last a while, but do not absorb.

 

Lint-free fiber towels/Fiberlene is durable, good heat conductor, absorbs, protects the base and also has a light abrasive/polishing ability.

 

Blue shop towels are more durable than paper towels and are thicker. They are poor heat conductors and you need more heat to achieve the same heat necessary to melt wax and absorb excess wax.

 

If you are trying to remove excess wax, I find it's far easier, quicker, fewer steps, and less material usage to:

1) Minimize how much wax you do apply

2) Immediately after ironing the wax, perform a 'light hot scrape' using moderate pressure to squeegee/scrape off the excess.

 

You only need a thin layer of wax and light scraping off the excess still leaves plenty of wax to cool and perform a final scrape and brushing.

post #5 of 30
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the great advice!

post #6 of 30

I've never tried it, but it seems to me that kitchen parchment would work. It works great on baking trays when making cookies. Anyone tried that?

post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post

I've never tried it, but it seems to me that kitchen parchment would work. It works great on baking trays when making cookies. Anyone tried that?

 

This reminded me that skin glue removal is facilitated by using brown paper bags between the skins and iron, though at hotter temps than wax.

 

post #8 of 30

Personally never used fiberlene, wasn't sure what the extra expense would buy me.  

post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Personally never used fiberlene, wasn't sure what the extra expense would buy me.  


High slipperiness at the start (first run) with much less brushing.    

 

post #10 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by primoz View Post

Paper towel will not get caught in fire, if that's your problem. But it still won't work. It will fall apart in second, when it will touch melted wax, so unless you would be using it for fluoro powders it's more or less useless. In all those years I was in this business I didn't find anything that could substitute fiberlene... at least for this kind of usage. For cleaning skis, hot iron or anything else, normal paper towel works perfectly, but for ironing wax with "paper" between ski and iron, fiberlene is only way to go. So only substitution n is no paper at all... and this works fine for most of time :)


Depends on the brand.  The paper towels they sell at Costco work reasonably well - have them in a pinch, but you'll have to crank the iron a little bit hotter than with fiberline.  Works best with warm temp waxes, and also good for lifting spring dirt out of the bases.  Would be a pain with a cold-temp wax.

 

Since I've started using fiberline, I've switched to crayoning instead of dripping, and the initial cost of fiberline pays for itself rapidly in reduced wax usage.  I'm using less than 1/3 of the wax I used before.

 

The best deal for fiberline is the 30cm wide roll for snowboards, which can be cut into two 15cm rolls.  Split the cost with a buddy and you'll have a life time supply for under 10 bucks.

 

 

post #11 of 30


It may not be available at your locale but is certainly available online at numerous sites.

 

Alpinord at Slidewright.com has rolls by SVST.  I use rolls to clean the bases but, I like the Box of 100 Swix sheets for waxing. 1 sheet does 2 skis (200 hundred skis oer box,  damn reasonable!) . $17.95 a box at http://www.tognar.com/swix-fiberlene-hot-waxing-pro-paper-pack/

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by floatn4frnt View Post

Wondering if there's a substitute for Fiberlene (or similar) that can be use for hot iron passes.  I've read that you can use a paper towel, but not too keen on giving that a shot - just sounds wrong with a hot iron.  I know it's cheap, but I dont live in an area where it's  readily available.

 

thanks,

mike



 


Edited by Atomicman - 12/9/11 at 3:15pm
post #12 of 30

There is no substitute for the best.  I literally don't even have to scrape anymore, best stuff EVAR!

post #13 of 30
I am using coffee filters. It is cheap, strong and thin.
post #14 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimWaxOwnSkis View Post

I am using coffee filters. It is cheap, strong and thin.

coffee filters are cheaper than Fiberlene sheets??

 

How many skis can you do with a coffee filter?

post #15 of 30
What about shop towels, those are tough as hell and very absorbent.
post #16 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

What about shop towels, those are tough as hell and very absorbent.

From what I've read on here, they're not totally lint free like fiberlene, and don't transmit heat as well so you have to crank the iron up a bit.  Honestly at 20 bucks for 200 sheets, I ended up springing for the fiberlene.  It's like 10 cents per wax job.  20 cents if you are a noob like me and use too much wax so you have to use 1 sheet per ski.

post #17 of 30

fiberlene seems expensive until you realize how much money it saves you in wax and time.

post #18 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 

If you are trying to remove excess wax, I find it's far easier, quicker, fewer steps, and less material usage to:

1) Minimize how much wax you do apply

2) Immediately after ironing the wax, perform a 'light hot scrape' using moderate pressure to squeegee/scrape off the excess.

 

You only need a thin layer of wax and light scraping off the excess still leaves plenty of wax to cool and perform a final scrape and brushing.

 

This is an interesting approach.  What do you think Primroz, Atomicaman, others?

post #19 of 30

Minimize how much wax do you apply, can be tricky thing, especially since you put too little and you burn ptex (that's main reason why whole can of CeraF is good for 2 pairs of skis ;)) But it's also true, that putting so much wax, that it's dripping down everywhere, doesn't make any difference, so trick is to find somehow optimal amount... not too little to burn ptex, and not too much since you are wasting wax, and you have whole lot of work cleaning bunch of wax from sides (from base it's no big deal).

2. is probably fine, but I never did (and I still don't) bug with this. With sharp scrapper it doesn't take much more time to take off little or a lot of wax, so personally I wax, let it cool and scrape off when it's cooled.

post #20 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


2) Immediately after ironing the wax, perform a 'light hot scrape' using moderate pressure to squeegee/scrape off the excess.

 

I started doing this because all the scraping needed to get a lot of cold wax off when the ski is cold surely cant be good for the base structure
 

post #21 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

coffee filters are cheaper than Fiberlene sheets??

How many skis can you do with a coffee filter?
Walmart white basket paper filters . 1.99 for 200 pieces. You need one sheet per ski. So 2 cents per pair.
post #22 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by TimWaxOwnSkis View Post

Walmart white basket paper filters . 1.99 for 200 pieces. You need one sheet per ski. So 2 cents per pair.

Comparing with fiberlene, coffee filters pick up less dirt but is stronger. They are both lint free.
I hot rub the wax on skis. Lay the filter flat under iron. Run iron from tip once, the paper under iron would saturated with wax in 10 inch. You don't need to put wax on tail portion. The wax on the paper is enough to cover it. Flap the paper over and use same saturated part run from tip once more. Run the iron one more time. this time move the paper around . Use dry portion to pick as much wax as possible. Very little scraping and brushing are needed after that.
post #23 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Personally never used fiberlene, wasn't sure what the extra expense would buy me.  

 

 

 

I too was wondering the same thing.  Started doing my own tunes a couple of seasons ago and steadily seem to be getting better at it (probably directly related to how much good tuning info I read on Epicski.)   Recently tried using fiberlene to see what the advantage might be when ironing wax ((had already taken to crayoning wax vs. dripping – huge savings in $ and mess).  The issue I had with the fiberlene was I couldn’t keep it under the iron – iron kept leaving it behind.  Was using the continuous roll fiberlene from Slidewright and cutting it a little larger than the iron base.  Anyone else experience this problem?  Solution?

post #24 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post

 

 

 Was using the continuous roll fiberlene from Slidewright and cutting it a little larger than the iron base.  Anyone else experience this problem?  Solution?

 

This is why the T-74 iron has a giant clip on it.

post #25 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post

 

 

 

Was using the continuous roll fiberlene from Slidewright and cutting it a little larger than the iron base.  Anyone else experience this problem?  Solution?

 

Cut it twice as large and hold the part that isn't under the iron?  Then flip it around for the other ski.

post #26 of 30
Cut fiberlene from roll only after using it. Hold the roll with one hand and hold iron with another. Move fiberlene instead of moving iron. It looks like pulling a rug with a chair on top of it.
post #27 of 30

"big clips", cut twice as large", "hold the roll/cut afterward".....damn you guys are smartyahoo.gif.  That's why I keep reading this stuff.

post #28 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Personally never used fiberlene, wasn't sure what the extra expense would buy me.  



I too was wondering the same thing.  Started doing my own tunes a couple of seasons ago and steadily seem to be getting better at it (probably directly related to how much good tuning info I read on Epicski.)   Recently tried using fiberlene to see what the advantage might be when ironing wax ((had already taken to crayoning wax vs. dripping – huge savings in $ and mess).  The issue I had with the fiberlene was I couldn’t keep it under the iron – iron kept leaving it behind.  Was using the continuous roll fiberlene from Slidewright and cutting it a little larger than the iron base.  Anyone else experience this problem?  Solution?

Got Fiberlene for Christmas! Love it. Also have the roll. Cut a hunk for each ski, hold iron sideways as it doesn't have a clip and anyway the skis are wide, and hold the hunk and run the iron up the ski three passes, using a different section of the Fiberlene each time. Works great, way less scraping AND IS REMOVING DIRT while you're at it.
post #29 of 30

I also have a SWIX roll of fiberlene.  The first time I used it, I fell in love.  It really did make waxing easier and less messy.  Someone here (Atomicman, if I remember right, but maybe not) posted some instructions which helped me.

 

As to leaving it behind, I just made the fiberlene a little oversize and have it stick out in front of the iron.  I grab the part in front with my other hand, pull up gently, and move the iron and paper together.  The iron sideways just barely covers the whole ski -- not sure what I'd do if my skis were any wider.

post #30 of 30

Fiberlene all the way. But I like the sheets!

 

Since 1 sheet does 2 skis yous got plenty of room to hold onto the Fiberlene and pull it with the iron.

 

Seems to me Alpinord has the tail wagging the dog. That is a lot of more futzing around than putting a piece of paper under the iron and make one pass.

 

He always like to reinvent the wheel, whenstandard o modus operandi

 

Also you shouldn't put TOO MUCH WAX on either way!


Edited by Atomicman - 3/25/13 at 7:41pm
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