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The Lesson Wrap-Up

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

Instructors: How do you wrap-up your lessons? What are your objectives for this part of the lesson? How do you know if what you're doing is effective? Comments...

 

Students: What kinds of summary-type information do you want your instructor to impart before he or she leaves you on your own?

post #2 of 10

I ask my students what they've learned during the past hour/hours, and how they learned it.  They need to then remember what we did, and it's fun seeing how they describe in their own words the stuff we've been working on.  They need to evaluate how well they are doing with the issue we addressed.  

 

Then I ask them what their homework is.  That usually gets them guessing, which is good because after they flounder around a bit I can recap what they need to continue working on till next time, and how they might go about doing that.  I finish up with a suggestion that they take it to the slopes, mix intermittent practice in with their play.

 

Last - I suggest that they work on things until they stop seeing progress and hit a plateau, then come back for more lessons.  Final thing, thanks and hope you had as good a time as I did.

post #3 of 10



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

 

Students: What kinds of summary-type information do you want your instructor to impart before he or she leaves you on your own?



Give a realistic summary of what the student has accomplished during the lesson along with detailed drills that the student can work on during their free skiing time for added improvements.  Some of the most notable ah! moments come after lessons and later taking these new drills to work on.  Also a heads-up note that when the student starts falling back into bad movement patterns to stop immediately and concentrate on newly acquired skills in more efficient skiing. Sometimes its hard to break old habits.

I remember years back I had an instructor that towards the end of the lesson for that day she remarked that if you would quit being so tentative, start moving towards your new turn, relax and let the skis take you there, you would then notice a vast improvement.  Right she was, great instructor, she was a petite, lively, always a big smile, passionate skier that helped many here learn to ski so much better!wink.gif

 

post #4 of 10
The wrap-up starts with the introductory discussion and continues throughout. If you wait until the end of the lesson to review what you've talked about and done, there's too much to cover. I keep trying to relate whatever we're doing throughout the lesson to the goals expressed originally, either as reinforcement or as acknowledgement of change. About the only thing I add at the end would be what the next lesson should entail. I'm fortunate to be working where lessons mostly are all-day or, at a minimum, half a day.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 

Aw, Ragin'. Nobody does it better.

 

Kneale and other instructors, do you try to sell the students on another lesson--other than providing the good lesson you just gave them?

 


Edited by nolo - 12/6/11 at 6:27pm
post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post

Aw, Ragin'. Nobody does it better.

 

Kneale and other instructors, do you try to sell the students on another lesson--other than providing the good lesson you just gave them?

 


 

I usually give one hour lessons unless it's a three-hour first time on skis lesson.  For the one hours, our recap covers what they've accomplished, what they can expect in the near future from continuing the work we began today, and I always suggest what situation might prompt another lesson in the future.  I don't feel comfortable being a salesman for the sake of profit for the mountain or future lessons from me, but I do want to impart a realistic view of what's possible in their future should they want to progress further by building on what we did today.

post #7 of 10

A recap of whatever got me to whatever aha! moment that I had during the lesson.  I often dissect the lessons in my head over a period of time, so an invitation, and a preferred way, to reconnect with the instructor helps me if I have questions in the future.

post #8 of 10
I'm not much of a self-promoter, but I use the wrap-up to point out what I'd hope to accomplish in the next lesson.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 

That could be construed as a soft sales pitch, Kneale. Why do we shy away from selling ourselves and lessons? Are ski lessons aiming to be one of the best kept secrets in the business?

post #10 of 10

You may be rushed to move onto your next lesson, lunch or whatever. STOP! Take your time to thank your clients for all there hard work, Give each person a skill set that fits what they are personally working on. Point out the terrain and lifts where they can challenge themselves safely and without frustration. Maybe encourage a break or rest before they continue. Spend the time to reinforce the progress they achieved and how they got there. Above all man. If you are teaching children, be sure to communicate with the parents and answer truthfully. Sell yourself, give them a business card or recommend another instructor to continue there improvements with. Someone you know would be a good fit for them. Hey, what comes around goes around. Cheers. Tek Head..

 

Steve eh.jpg00050004.jpg

 

 

TURN EM!!!!

 

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