or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Is Patagonia stuff really that good?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is Patagonia stuff really that good? - Page 2

post #31 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by job151 View Post

and my capilene very lightweight zip top is still working (smells a bit tho) and it is something like a 97-99 piece.  agree on the static issue, kind of get used to it over the years.  Had to buy a medium weight two years ago, and is just too warm for most days on the hill 



The newer stuff doesn't have the static issue of the old your mentioning. Different material, much more comfortable, and wicks far better.

post #32 of 55

This is a bit off topic, but the posts on extra durable gear rang a bell with me. I took my late-1980s Eddie Bauer Windfoil jacket out of the washer this morning (can't even guess how many times it's been washed), and I suddenly realized how old it is, how many miles it has travelled, and how much weather it has fended off. It is not faded, pilled, abraded or worn. I sprayed it with water repellant, hung it to dry, and it looks brand new. Absolutely the most bulletproof garment I have ever owned. And it didn't cost a lot.

post #33 of 55

All of their stuff has Lifetime Guarantee. If something from them doesn't hold up, they will replace it or send you a gift card for something new. I have taken advantage of this offer enough that IMO, it makes the increased cost worth it. 

 

Also, they have new initiative through eBay where folks sell their gently used Patagonia stuff that is no longer useful to them, but maybe to someone else. Even if you buy it second hand, the Lifetime Guarantee still applies. I've even seen where employees sell their samples through this program, so some items are practically brand new. 

 

IMO, Patagonia stuff- definitely worth it!

post #34 of 55

Another word about their warranty.

Twenty years ago I bought some of their foul weather gear. When it started to leak at the seams more than a few years ago, I sent it back to them asking them if it were possible to retape them. A few days later  I recieved a phone call from the warranty department. A very polite young woman told me that they can't repair my gear, and that they can't replace it as they no longer made it. As such would I like a merchandise credit for the gear? I figured that it would be worth a hundred bucks at the very most. The woman at the other end said that they took the original selling price of the gear in the last year that they made it, and marked it up based on the average cost that their merchandise went up. When it was all said and done, I ended up with a merchandise credit for more than a third more than I spent on the gear!

Needless to say, I've been on the Patagonia bandwagon for a while now.

 

Mike

post #35 of 55

I bought a shell jacket from them (I think its called the primo) about 4 years ago, from one of their outlet stores.  The price was to be $190 or so.  The lady on the phone hesitated for a second as she confirmed my order and said, "you know what, you don't want to order this now, call back on Monday, we will hold it for you."  I was slightly confused and asked why, and she said, "well, its friday, we won't ship it until monday anyway, just call back monday" So I called back two days later, asked for her, and she said, "Well we just happen to be having a sale on this jacket..." So I paid around $120... for what was I believe a $350 jacket, retail. 

 

Last winter, as I was pulling my ski gear out of the closet, I noticed that a few of the stiches had started to let go on one of the sleeves... very minor.  Just for the hell of it, (because I lived very close to a regular patagonia store), I brought it in to see if they could repair it, and I figured all along I'd have to pay for something.  The clerk stated that it would probably take about 8 weeks for them to repair and send back the jacket, due to the start of winter and lots of people trying to get their stuff repaired.  I said it wasn't that much of an issue, so no worries, and the clerk stated, "well, let me see what else we could do."  She came back a few min later and said that I could pick out a new primo jacket, right off the rack...  I think they cost $400 at the time.

 

Now that's customer service, and I will probably be a patagonia customer for life.  I also love my ski jacket, r3 jacket and the rest of my base layers from them.  Very good gear, in my opinion.

post #36 of 55

The Patagonia outerwear I've owned (and for the most part still own) has been well designed and absolutely bombproof. 

 

I bought a "Guide Jacket" in 1992; for a couple of years (until I found something better) it pulled double duty as my ski and around town jacket, and has since been my "go to" outerwear every winter. The color of the plastic snaps has faded over the years (from green to kind of purplish), but other than that, it's still going strong. Over the years I've also bought a couple of their shells and a pair of shell pants; whatever I'm no longer wearing was retired after 10+ years of heavy use.

 

Love the fact that if something like a zipper or snap breaks after a few years, they'll fix it for free instead of trying to sell you a new garment. 

 

Also a big fan of their Capilene underwear, particularly the lightweight stuff. 

 

 

 

 

post #37 of 55

I still use my pile jacket (pre-fleece) I bought in 1983 on an unexpectedly cold day on the way to rock climbing in New Paltz NY. I've used it over the years for rock climbing, hiking, back packing, and taken it on numerous river trips.I do kind of reserve  it now though since it is still one of my favorites.

post #38 of 55
The thing about L.L. Bean you are all overlooking is their customer service and warranty. I have never experienced such helpful and understanding people other than when I needed help with an order I made with Bean. They also let you exchange or return anything you bought their with no questions asked no matter how long you own it. I went in there with a beat up pair of boots and they gave me a brand new pair no questions asked.
post #39 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mazur6913 View Post

The thing about L.L. Bean you are all overlooking is their customer service and warranty. I have never experienced such helpful and understanding people other than when I needed help with an order I made with Bean. They also let you exchange or return anything you bought their with no questions asked no matter how long you own it. I went in there with a beat up pair of boots and they gave me a brand new pair no questions asked.

yeah, just like Patagonia!
post #40 of 55
Nice thread from the grave.

Patagonia and LLBean are both decent stuff. I tend to buy the Patty stuff on sale. Great company. If it fits, buy it.
post #41 of 55
I have patagucci stuff fifteen years old still in regular use. Mid layers, fleece & shells. Can't say the same for TNF and Marmot falls apart in a single season.
post #42 of 55
The way I see it, no clothing brand makes their own fabric/insulation/waterproofing and they all buy from the same several manufacturers, so read what's being used and see if that suits you, not what logo is displayed.

Unless the logo IS what you want
post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Crab View Post

I have patagucci stuff fifteen years old still in regular use. Mid layers, fleece & shells. Can't say the same for TNF and Marmot falls apart in a single season.

The new TNF stuff is junk, but I have an old gore tex shell of theirs that I've been using for 10+ years. VF Corp (Fruit of the Loom, Jansport, etc.) bought TNF and it's been downhill ever since.

 

Patagonia does make good stuff, but once I'm in that price range, I usually find myself going Arcteryx. They make some really nice, technical gear.

post #44 of 55

I used to steer away from Patagonia, just 'cause I once worked in a shop that stocked other brands and got into the habit of buying those. Here's my two cents:
-If you can afford it, Arctyeryx is about as good as anything; fit is a bit particular
-Once upon a time Marmot made the best stitched garments around. I think that's no longer true, though I still buy a fair amount of their gear as it fits me well and is pretty good for the pricing
-North Face really gets raked over the coals on sites like ours, but in value/money terms it's hard to beat and can be found on sale almost any time of the year. They've got a brand store near me and stuff gets marked way down off-season
-Mammut makes very good gear, though probably gets less love in North America than Arcteryx does; some of their styling choices are weird IMO

-Bought my first pair of Patagonia Gore Tex pants last season and I'm impressed. Very simple, sensible design, not as slim-cut as I'd feared

-I've never owned Mountain Hardware (do have one of their tents), though impressed with what I've seen
-A lot of the serious ski touring dudes I know here swear by Montura; not sure if that's available outside Europe
-The other brand that's making a lot of headway over here is Peak Performance; looks a bit fluffy to me, but solid enough

I've sent a lot of stuff back to Marmot and North Face for replacement over the years with great results. Arcteryx was a little fussier in the one case I needed a replacement (jacket ruined on first machine washing), but they ultimately pulled through and gave me a new one. 

 

post #45 of 55

I have some Patagonia Jackets that I wore for almost 30 years (until either they shrank or I grew:)) they still looked good and functioned great when I gave them to St. Vincent DuPaul.  Money well spent.

post #46 of 55

I have a bunch of Patagonia shirts that I wear all the time, one of which is more than 20 years old.  

 

The main reason I buy a lot of Patagonia is fit.  I'm a really skinny guy and find it hard to feel comfortable in the clothes most companies make.  But not Patagonia.  They fit me correctly each time.

 

But I also like the durability and the fact that they are conscientious about the labor the use and the environmental impact their stuff makes, though I expect some of that is overblown.

post #47 of 55

I'm still wearing my capilene tops after 16 years.  I love it so much that on any given ski trip it'll get half the ski days, since I'll handwash it at nights a few times, while the other clothes just kept put in the dirty pile.  Wife loves hers too.

 

Fit is snug, but I like a tight fit for ski clothes.  

 

Their goods are not low priced to purchase....but they are high value over the long haul.  For growing children that may not make sense, but for adults, they are great.

post #48 of 55

I use the capilene shirt (forget what weight) as a midlayer, works great although it's piling a bit now after hundreds of days.

 

Anyone try the new freeride inspired stuff? Thinking specifically of the Gore Pro Powslayer shell. It looks awesome but haven't had a chance to try it on in person yet. $650 so we are talking Arc'Teryx Gore Pro pricing.

post #49 of 55

I live in Maine and stopped by LL Bean gear a LONG TIME AGO.  Yes... they have an excellent warranty.  However, the quality of their gear is terrible.  I'm a BIG fly fisherman and every year I'd be returning boots and waders b/c they'd leak... 2 months into the season.  Same can be said for their ski gear.  It's no longer a quality product.


When I think of LL Bean, I think of the movie "Tommy Boy".  In Tommy Boy, Chris Farley was trying to sell his company's brake shoes who thought the competitor's brake shoes were a better product b/c of their great guarantee.  When asked about the "guarantee" stamped on the competitor's box, Farley replied "that's because it's a guaranteed piece of shit.  If you want me to take a dump in a box and stamp it with a guarantee, I can do that too."  Kind of sums up LL Bean products these days.

 

Bill

post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sugarloafer321 View Post

I live in Maine and stopped by LL Bean gear a LONG TIME AGO.  Yes... they have an excellent warranty.  However, the quality of their gear is terrible.  I'm a BIG fly fisherman and every year I'd be returning boots and waders b/c they'd leak... 2 months into the season.  Same can be said for their ski gear.  It's no longer a quality product.


When I think of LL Bean, I think of the movie "Tommy Boy".  In Tommy Boy, Chris Farley was trying to sell his company's brake shoes who thought the competitor's brake shoes were a better product b/c of their great guarantee.  When asked about the "guarantee" stamped on the competitor's box, Farley replied "that's because it's a guaranteed piece of shit.  If you want me to take a dump in a box and stamp it with a guarantee, I can do that too."  Kind of sums up LL Bean products these days.

Bill

This, in a nutshell. The best guarantee is the one you don't need to use. Taking/shipping stuff back to the vendor is a hassle and time suck.

If you are regularly using a warranty, the stuff is shit.
post #51 of 55

Regarding the Patagonia warranty / guarantee...  I had a Patagonia rain jacket for many years.  The interior lining started to disintegrate, so I took it into the Patagonia store in Boston.

 

They looked at it, said "that shouldn't happen" and the sales lady grabbed a brand-new one off the shelf and handed it over to me.  I gave her a stunned look of "what's this?" and she said "your replacement...  do you want a different color?"

 

I have quite a few Patagonia items in my closet; that's the only repair / return I've had so far.

post #52 of 55

When I was a teen I loved skiing in jeans or cords, a cheap ski jacket, simple long johns, turtleneck, etc.  Don't remember feeling like I  had issues with my ski clothing.

 

Now I'm fussy about everything and am always looking for lighter, better, etc.  Have I sold out?

post #53 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post


yeah, just like Patagonia!

Wasn't that the point from the beginning .... same quality product, same top-notch customer service, much lower price. 

post #54 of 55

i used to be anit-patagucci until i purchased some capilene layering clothing. tend to like it better than smartwool. i also recently purchased the nano puff jacket and am very satisfied. luckily we have a patagonia store in town for any related issues. the significant other also has veered to purchase some of there jackets, etc. and has been nothing but happy.

post #55 of 55
Patagonia sizing can be inconsistent, super long sleeves, some cuts are weird. But great quality and service.

I have sold my 1980s vintage Patagonia on eBay and gotten a lot because it's collectible. Sold an early pile jacket for $350 once.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Is Patagonia stuff really that good?