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Any benefit to a hot box treatment on a seasoned ski?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

If you have a pair of race skis that were stone ground last season, put through a thorough prep (a couple hot box cycles, many cycles of scraping, brushing, fibertex polish, wax, etc.) and were raced during the season with requisite pre/post waxing/tuning for each race, is there any benefit to a hot box treatment now?  I have my own hot box but not sure its worth the effort and risk of warping the ski. Seems to me like a ski has to be fully saturated after all of the above.  Can you really get more wax into that base?

 

I have had skis go in to the hot box perfectly flat and come out not quite so perfect anymore. I limit the hot box temp to 130F to avoid warping but even at 130F when you get the inside of that ski warmed up, all the glue, epoxy, wood, metal, etc., which all expand and contract at different rates, things can happen. So, these days my perspective is to limit hot box treatments.

 

The Montana Wax Future infrared machine makes tremendous sense to me.  Only heats up the base material, not the core of the ski. Unfortunately one of those is just a tad out of my price range!  I have pondered the idea of buying an infrared pizza maker ($40 at Target) and making my own. There is room in the basement right next to my cold fusion experiments. A plus would be that you can make pizza and wax skis at the same time!

 

So, I'm interested to hear opinions about if you can get more wax into a "seasoned" ski?

 

BST

 

 

post #2 of 4

a.jpgThat is a very good question and I was wondering the same thing.  The logic tells me no, a ski that is already saturated with wax will not need additional hot boxing.  That is until you ski on it for a couple days without waxing it.  Then it is obvious by looking at your bases that there isn't the same amount of wax in the ski.  For instance, I take care of my daughter's skis.  I have used my version of hot boxing and went to town on her skis.  She then takes them with her and I don't see them for 3-4 days of skiing.  They come back with dry spots and that shiny dark base is completely gone. 

 

As for my personal version of a hot box, call me crazy, but I think this works awesome.  Radiant heat from my wood stove.  The air is 80 degrees but the base is around 110+ because I can put my hand on it but it's uncomfortable.  The wax is very close to liquid, and in a few spots it is liquid.  I do half a ski at a time, and flip it after 30 min.  Great results on the hill.  Either nobody tunes their skis or what I am doing works because I just cruise past people trying really hard to go fast.

post #3 of 4

Another way is to wax them, put them in the car in a sunny with the windows rolled up.

 

Cheap hot box. and It won't get to hot.

 

Why are you doing this anyways, are you looking for that extra 10th of a second to move you into first place.

 

I'have been out of racing for a few years now, but a good prep'ed ski and good skills will net you a btter time. It's about the skills more then anything else.

 

Old story, #1 kid on the race team somehow trashed his race skis. He had to race on a old pair of skis, he still won the event. I heard the story from a buddy whoes son was on the race team.

 

The only time my skis have come close to a hot box is in the car on the drive hot from VT in April. I remember the car sitting in the sun then picking up the skis and seeing wax melting.

 

I can outglide all my buddy's and catch some of the race team kids. when gliding on the flats.

 

I asked a respected tech at the local ski shop about it once, his background is, a tuner on the US ski team. He said it's more important to have wax in the ski then perfect bases. My skis get stone ground once may twice in there lives, I also get over 150 day's out a pair of Volkls. I do my own tuning. My AC40's from 4 years ago still have great edge hold. They were awesome yesterday.

 

 

 

 

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basement Ski Tech View Post

So, I'm interested to hear opinions about if you can get more wax into a "seasoned" ski?

 

BST

 

 


First off, what makes you think you need to hot box them? Are they gliding well or not?

 

An alternative is to simply apply a prep wax layer and let cool. Re-iron. Let cool. Repeat to your hearts desire. This will work similar to the home made infrared option using tools you have. I've thought about the deli warming counter approach as well. If controllable it might be nice

 

What about lower temps in the hot box?

 

 

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