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Curing a "reverse wedge"

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm not sure this is even the right term, but my tails tend to drift toward each other as I turn. I think it's most pronounced in the middle of the turn, but I don't have video so I'm not sure. This seems to be worse on my 112mm rockered skis vs. my 85mm all mountain skis, but the 112s are new so I might just be getting used to them. Any ideas? Thanks.

post #2 of 13

Could be alignment. Could be technique. Get video.

post #3 of 13

Does it feel like you are over steering your inside ski?

 

I find that if I pull my inside ski under my body and dial back the inside steering I get less divergence.

post #4 of 13

What's happening to your tips when this happens?

post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 

JayT -- tips are diverging. My inside ski feels planted, but the outside one is drifting.

post #6 of 13

 In reality there needs to be a bit of a diverging stance since the skis are at different places in their arcs. It's not a huge difference but think about it for a moment, the inside half of the body is leading, so the inside foot is leading as well.

 

Beyond that the outside ski "drifting"suggests a lack of pressure on that ski and a lateral balance issue. Which is why pulling back the inside foot may be exactly the opposite of what you need to do. Pick up that inside ski and balance on the outside ski during your turns. When you have a good feeling for how that feels, put the inside ski back down and make some turns. The key here is to allow weight bearing to occur naturally and to use the inside ski to compliment what were are doing with the outside ski.

 

Another key is how you develop lead and counter. Again it should occur naturally as you steer with your legs but most people mistakenly think they need to artificially enhance it. If you are balanced on both feet prior to the turn, the simple act of steering equally with both legs should reveal a profound difference in effort / outcomes. Simply stated a weighted and engaged ski takes more effort to produce the same amount of redirecting (turning). So the outside ski should be a bit harder to turn compared to the less weighted inside ski. Again this is a good thing since the muscles used to externally rotate that leg are inherently weaker than the muscles used to internally rotate it.

 

Eventually as you get more experienced with turning the inside ski while balancing mostly on the outside ski, all of this will make a lot more sense. Just remember that the inside half needs to be balanced on the inside foot, even if most of your weight is balanced on the outside ski. A phrase Bob Barnes shared with us goes something like this "If you are pulling or pushing either one of your feet around under your body, you aren't all that balanced in the first place." I would add that  when you can ski with better lateral (foot to foot and inside half / outside half) balance you will find the push / pull of your feet is largely superfluous.

 

Hope that makes sense...

JASP

Keystone Ski and Ride School

Alpine Staff Trainer

post #7 of 13

The same thing started happening to me last year (and got progressively worse) when using plus 100mm waisted skis until I saw a photo of myself.  In an effort to carve trenches with fatter skis I improperly (I guess) got way over the uphill (soon to be downhill) ski after transitioning into the new turn. My body was simply out of position, not "inside" the turn (I am sure there is a better description).  One ski would carve a trench while the other either diverged out or was just lifted off the snow.  The cure was easy.  I took out a pair of Laser SC (63mm waist) for a morning on frozen over snow and learned to carve again with the body where it belongs, and then accepted the fact that fat skis won't necessarily behave like carving skis.  Perhaps you are doing that too, which likely puts a lot of stress on only one knee throughout the turn?

post #8 of 13

I want to add a follow up here, certain ski maneuvers feature some balance adjustments in the fore / aft and lateral planes. Some of those adjustments include repositioning the feet relative to the body. I am in no way saying that shouldn't occur during those maneuvers. Only that as a baseline we need to own a centered and well balanced stance in both planes and hemispheres. Then and only then are we ready to explore the wider RoM present in those more advanced maneuvers.

wink.gif

post #9 of 13

I imagined a "drifting" of the inside ski which is the usual issue with over diverging skis. Everyone gets a little "too diverged" at times when they hold on to that last turn just a tad too long and try to ride it out. Pulling your inside foot back under your body is a "corrective" move though that is occasionally necessary for even the best of skiers.  As JASP said if it truly is an outside ski issue you need more weight distribution / pressure on the outside ski.

 

 

post #10 of 13



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by quant2325 View Post

The same thing started happening to me last year (and got progressively worse) when using plus 100mm waisted skis until I saw a photo of myself.  In an effort to carve trenches with fatter skis I improperly (I guess) got way over the uphill (soon to be downhill) ski after transitioning into the new turn. My body was simply out of position, not "inside" the turn (I am sure there is a better description).  One ski would carve a trench while the other either diverged out or was just lifted off the snow.  The cure was easy.  I took out a pair of Laser SC (63mm waist) for a morning on frozen over snow and learned to carve again with the body where it belongs, and then accepted the fact that fat skis won't necessarily behave like carving skis.  Perhaps you are doing that too, which likely puts a lot of stress on only one knee throughout the turn?

Even though different skis act differently this example shows how important finding good lateral balance can be. 
 

 

post #11 of 13

Matt, a lot of the time, in an effort to expedite the new turn, a skier allows the inside and outside half to move out of sycronicity. In other words if the outside half is finishing the current turn, then the inside half needs to do the same. Patience is the key...

post #12 of 13

mtb1,

 

As others have eluded to, it sounds like you are tipping (or leaning) in too much and bracing on your inside ski.  It is a natural tendency to turn the foot of the inside ski outward when bracing.  Have your lateral alignment checked, if you are too much on your outside edges in your stance, you will be pitched to the inside of the turn too much and have to brace against the inside foot. Shimming the sole of the boots is something you can try (on the arch side) to see if that makes a difference.  If so, the boot soles can be planed and a riser plate can be applied along with heel and toe routing to effect a permanent cant.  This part of the fix can only be done by qualified boot fitter.

 

RW

post #13 of 13

Agree with TheRusty here, a video would clarify a few things!

 

But... my first intuition tells me you are probably too weight biased to your inside ski and not getting pressure to your outside ski shovel.  

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