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binding adjustment needed?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

My son outgrew his ski boots (as usual) and I got him a new pair this year.

He went from a mondo size 26 to a mondo size 27.

The old ski boots were 305mm and the new boots are 314mm.

He is keeping his skis from last year.

I was planning to adjust the bindings to fit the skis.

However, I put the new boots on (my feet are same size as my son's) to see how they fit the binding and they seemed to fit the ski fine.

They snapped on with no problem.  I didn't need to force them.

So, is this ok?  Do you think they should be adjusted anyway in case they are too snug?


Thanks for any advice.

post #2 of 7

Just because you can get the boot into the binding doesn't mean that the safety of the binding hasn't been compromised by either too little or (in this case) too much forward pressure.  Too much forward pressure may cause the toe piece to jam, and an increase in boot length of 9mm is definitely going to create too much forward pressure on the toe.


It's a simple procedure to set the correct forward pressure on the heel piece and then do a release check.  What bindings are on the skis?  You shouldn't need to touch the toe pieces since they are built to meet boot din standards and don't have height or width adjustments anymore (with a few rare exceptions).  Ideally the toe piece should be moved forward slightly to account for the longer boot sole length, but for the small size difference it isn't a big deal and not doing it won't affect your son's skiing.

post #3 of 7

I'm confused. You were planning on adjusting the binding yourself but don't already know what the forward pressure indicator is? Do you mean you were planning to have a shop do it or is the binding on a track? If it is not on a track then the only way to adjust it for a longer boot is to slide back the forward pressure adjustment.

post #4 of 7

Please don't be insulted but your post indicates you really have no idea what's involved here. Please leave the adjustment to a professional. The consequences for doing it wrong far outweigh the very minor cost of getting it done properly.

post #5 of 7

What Dave said.  Just get them adjusted for your son.

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thanks for all the advice.  I always have had his skis and boots adjusted professionally.  Usually he outgrew skis and boots each year so I always just had them fitted when making the purchase.  Since he was keeping the skis this year, I thought maybe I would be able to do the adjustment myself (for the boots).  Sounds like that is not a good idea.  Thanks again.

post #7 of 7

You WILL have to adjust the forward pressure.  Check the charts; you may have to adjust the DIN to account for his growth as well.  Longer feet = lower DIN, more weight = higher DIN.

What binding do you have, make and model? 

After having a few skis tuned "professionally by a shop" and after I got my car back from the stealership after a tune up with the number 6 and 8 spark plug wires crossed and the bill indicating they had done a road check too I have absolutely no faith in " professional " service (Whiteroom and other bears excepted)  If you want something done right do it yourself!  If you have a high enough IQ to post your question on this form you can learn how to adjust a binding.


Also, when you're all said and done, check the boot centre mark for alignment with the ski.  If the toe is already a little too far back, it may put the longer boot even farther back.  Too far back would affect how easy it is to engage the tips on hard snow, among other things.  If you have to remount, it's worth the peace of mind to get a good shop to do it, if and only if you can find a shop you trust.  Good luck.

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