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If I bought one more pair of skis, for VT, NH, NY and ME... - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Thread Starter 
* Atomic Crimson Ti skis (not Smoke Ti skis).
post #32 of 49

How did you come up with your list? IMO you'd be in over your head with most of the skis you have listed, especially the Crimson Ti which is a very burly, wide groomer oriented ski and NOT a good ski for powder. Most of your list are for strong skilled skiers. The Salomom Lord might be ok for you. Skis that would be easier to ski and give you a versitile all mountian experience would be:

Blizzard Bushwacker, Atomic Theory or Access or fischer Watea 88 or 98 to name a few.

Also, be sure to get some lessions.

post #33 of 49
Thread Starter 

Could have sworn I read that the Atomic Crimson Ti ski was "forgiving" and "wouldn't disappoint off piste". At 88 under foot isn't that entering that even 50 / 50 split territory between groomers and powder?

 

cool.gif

 

I anticipate a sizeable income tax refund. I work at a place that enables me to get skis for substantially less. And so I'm looking at getting something else to play with - different from what I have already. I ended last year wanting Volkl Unlimited AC 20 skis, but after thinking about it, they are not much different from the skis that I have - with an attractive design.

post #34 of 49

Take what you read with a grain of salt. I have skied the Crimson Ti in just a foot of powder and I can assure you it is not anything approaching a powder ski, a good strong ski for overpowering crud but not a ski that will float in powder. It is a binding system ski, as a very general rule of thumb, system skis are going to be more groomer oriented and flat skis are where you will find skis more suited to powder.

post #35 of 49

Look at it this way: You want second ski for soft snow. That means it should have some flex to it, and be wide enough to give you some float at 215 lbs. Most of the skis you're listing are too narrow, and a three (Kendo and Experience and Smoke) are more all-mountain designs that will handle crud nicely but are not great in real powder. So you need to decide whether this is a dedicated powder ski or an all purpose ski for all days when it's not icy. If the latter, fine list, I'd tack on the Blizzard Bushwacker. If the former, think about skis in the high 90's-low 100's like the Prophet 98, Nordica Hell n Back, Rossi S3/Scimitar, Blizzard The One that will be moderately forgiving, but still give you something to work with as you get better. Of the two strategies, you'll ski a all-purpose far more, but you'll have more fun when it snows, and see more difference from your narrow ski, if you try for a wider model. 

post #36 of 49
Thread Starter 

I could go with the Line Prophet 98, and perhaps have more fun with it when the conditions are ideal for it (which would be less often), or I could go with an all mountain ski with 88mm underfoot and find more uses for it and also have fun with it, no?

 

I mean, wouldn't the Rossignol Experience 88 be pretty darn good in a more likely scenario in the northeast - a foot of fresh powder before it melts? How much float does one really need on a powder day in the northeast?

 

Perhaps I could go wider and it would perform better on those very rare days, or I could go not as wide and get more uses out of it?

post #37 of 49

Well, I've pretty much quit using my mid-fats (86 mm wide).  I ski my 102 wide skis everywhere, even on Eastern ice.  They do fine, though they feel more GS-y.  If I really have a hankering for short turns, I have a real slalom ski I use once in a blue moon.

 

There may be something to the "wide skis on hardpack are hard on the ankles" theory, but I think people are talking about 110+ in that case.

The stiffness (or softness) and rise or not is going to make as much or more difference in feel than another 10 mm of width.

 

(It really would make more sense to wait till you are better and have developed more of a feel for what you like before you get more skis, but then it really makes more sense to sit inside by the fire.  But if it's what you want to do, go for it.)

post #38 of 49
Thread Starter 

As long as it makes more sense for you to sit inside by the fire also.

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

I could go with the Line Prophet 98, and perhaps have more fun with it when the conditions are ideal for it (which would be less often), or I could go with an all mountain ski with 88mm underfoot and find more uses for it and also have fun with it, no?

 

I mean, wouldn't the Rossignol Experience 88 be pretty darn good in a more likely scenario in the northeast - a foot of fresh powder before it melts? How much float does one really need on a powder day in the northeast?

 

Perhaps I could go wider and it would perform better on those very rare days, or I could go not as wide and get more uses out of it?


At your weight, an 88 mm ski is similar float to a 78- 80 for an average sized guy. Put another way, in a foot of fresh powder (which is rare), your E88's will sink like a stone. In 6" of chop and crud (more common) they'll ram through rather than float over. All depends on what you like to do on skis. Sinking may not be an issue; some here enjoy porpoising (I sometimes do). Also keep in mind that in the NE, powder = woods within 3 hours of storm's end. And you do not want to sink like a stone in the trees. IMO there are 98's out there that carve nearly as well as 88's, and have a lot more potential in soft snow. Given that  you already have the 70's covered, th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

As long as it makes more sense for you to sit inside by the fire also.



 

 

Umm, my point was it is not about what makes sense, it's about what you want to do.

post #41 of 49
Thread Starter 
Have I mentioned that I work at a place in which one of the perks is the ability to get new gear for like half of the retail price? I really did not want to mention that. So if I want to add another pair of skis to my quiver, which skis, of the ones that I mentioned, do you like? I work a second job specifically for toys that I otherwise could not get.
post #42 of 49

Was it what you listed earlier? Because, like others, I think you'd be best off pairing what you've got with a 98-100 waisted ski. That way you'd have two different skis for the conditions. Mountain looks like Superman's Fortress of Solitude? Take the Salomons out. Got some fresh snow or spring corn? Take out the mid-fats. Regardless of your purchasing situation, it would be redundant to add something with a 88 waist. You still wouldn't have a powder tool, and you might be buying a ski that won't be as good on the hard stuff as what you've already got. In my opinion, if you were looking for a one ski quiver for the east, you'd be looking at 88 waist skis, but if you can afford two pairs, an 88 shouldn't be in consideration whatsoever.

 

Also, a 98 waist is not quite a pure powder ski. It's still versatile and you'll pull it out on much more than just fresh snow days. It's also great in the spring mashed potatoes.

post #43 of 49
Thread Starter 
Thank you - I'll take that into consideration. It's just that I have read nothing but great things about the Rossognol Experience 88 skis - they seem to be good in many conditions and cover ability levels from intermediate through expert. It would definitely not hurt to add them if I can get them at a ridiculously good price. I'm also wondering if I'd find more of a use for them than a ski that is 100 at the waist?
post #44 of 49

I bought the Volkl Kendo last season after watching and talking with Okemo's Ski School director about his Kendo's. I would think the Rossi's 88's should be a close ski, if you can demo both.

 

 

post #45 of 49

Some clarification points might help: I saw you were from NY, where do you typically ski? Do they immediately groom everything as soon as active snow stop (this happens virtually everywhere in PA, NJ and in many of the southern NY mountains)? do you ski in trees? of what would your 50% off piste consist?

 

Powder in the east is a rarity, chopped up thick heavy wet stuff is much more likely. For busting through that snow, you need a certain amount of speed which you probably don't generate in difficult conditions as a newer skier. You will be slogging through that on most skis on your list. You can  go with a pretty wide (like the 88) ski and try to stay on top of it but that is going to present its own challenges - at 215 lbs. you will need a  long wide ski to distribute you weight. Most newer skiers have some trouble managing long  skis. The wider they get, the less long they need to be to displace an equal weight so I would probably recommend something on the wider side. That said, I would also have some concern about a 100 waisted ski being harder to carve and introducing some bad habits into your development. In the east, the ability to carve on firm snow is the most fundamental skill IMO and you don't want to be introducing rotary movements, pivots, skids on the new skis that will foul up you learning to carve on the narrower skis.

 

My recommendation would be to continue to work mostly with your current ski for drills/practice etc. as it will be a better tool for learning to carve. Keep the new ski for when the conditions are right for it. Think specialized not versatile. Every ski is better at some things than others, and given your access to bargains, you are likely to end up with a quiver of specialized skis anyway. Why not start now?

 

But if you can get current skis at 50% off, you can probably try one of the more popular models on your list out during the season and sell them here, on eBay or at ski swaps if you don't like them without too much loss. My own view is that as a good beginner/lower intermediate, you may be disappointed to discover that the ski has a lot less to do with performance than you do. The smartest move of course would be to take the money you would spend on skis and see if you could work out a weekly lesson deal over the winter with one of the higher level (II or III) instructors at your mountain.

post #46 of 49
Thread Starter 

Alright, so regardless I'll be purchasing the Rossignol Experience 88 skis. I want them and can get them new with bindings for $350 - they're as good as bought.

 

I appreciate all of the input but I just don't see enough of a need in the northeast for something 100mm under foot. 

 

Now the only question is how long I should get them?

 

I'm 5'9" / 175 pounds.

 

I'm looking at 170, 178 or 186.

 

170 puts them at the middle of my forehead and will probably be easier to turn and faster to react?

post #47 of 49

I think you should apply the same logic you have worked with so far,  use your experience to pick the best length that suits your needs.


 

So far you are targeting a all mountain ski with a relatively stiff build for technical turning,  it makes sense to buy the shorter turny ones to try and get them to perform

 

a different way! 

 

sorry edit, to quick on send

 

Best advice I have seen is spend money on the lessons one years skiing is not enough to be worrying about multiple pairs skis,  it really is an impulse buy you are doing.   Spending 350 on skis you dont need is not saving you anything!  save for the new skis later on.

 

Richo

Quote:
Originally Posted by twochordcool View Post

Alright, so regardless I'll be purchasing the Rossignol Experience 88 skis. I want them and can get them new with bindings for $350 - they're as good as bought.

 

I appreciate all of the input but I just don't see enough of a need in the northeast for something 100mm under foot. 

 

Now the only question is how long I should get them?

 

I'm 5'9" / 175 pounds.

 

I'm looking at 170, 178 or 186.

 

170 puts them at the middle of my forehead and will probably be easier to turn and faster to react?



 

post #48 of 49
Thread Starter 
To try to get them to perform a different way?
post #49 of 49
Thread Starter 

Started this thread over a year ago.

 

I got great deals through my job, so I bought a few pairs of skis this year.

 

I got the Salomon Rocker 2 90 skis, the Rossignol Experience 88 skis and the Blizzard Magnum 8.0 Ti skis...wider than what I had - great skis - but still don't know that I ended up with a dedicated snow day ski!

 

I may be done for the year...or I may get one more in the 98mm range or the 108mm range, tops.

 

The Atomic Alibis or the Line Sir Francis Bacons?

 

Realistically, if I get 15 days in this year the odds of me needing that is slim to none though.

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