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BURLY Ski Pants w/o the Bagginess

post #1 of 95
Thread Starter 

Looking for a pair of bullet-proof ski pant shells without looking like a park rat.

 

I've already considered...

 

TNF Free Thinkers (GT Pro Shell):  Sick, sick, sick pair of pants. But bulky legs that feel like chimneys.

Arcteryx Stinger (GT Pro Shell):  Love'em. Not a fan of a full bib.

Arcteryx Mako (GT Pro Shell):  Great cut. Don't want insulated. And fabric isn't as bomber as I was hoping.

Flylow Chemical (?):  Pretty bomber. Too baggy for my taste.

Norrona Lofoten (GT Pro Shell):  Same issue as the Chemicals.

Norrona Narvik (GT Perf Shell):  Great cut & design. Don't think the durability of the perf shell will cut it.

OR Mentor (GT Pro Shell):  These may just be the ones. Simple & straight forward. Not crazy about the full leg zip.

Westcomb Vapor (820 NT eVent):  Great product. Fabric may be a little supple - haven't seen in person. Park rat styling.

 

Yeah, maybe I'm being a bit picky. At least I know what I want. Have also heard good things about the Patagonia Primo pants and the Trew Eagle pants. Haven't gotten my hands on either yet to check'em out though.

 

Recommendations?

post #2 of 95

Have you looked at the Klim snowmobile pants? I've sort of lusted after a pair of those for a while. Like Arcteryx (which I have an love right now), they offer lengths. www.klim.com

 

The others are the Patagonia Primo pant. I'm not sure if it is still available in their regular catalog, but it is still offered to ski patrol so you may be able to scare up a pair. They're bomber shell pants, not bibs.

 

You looked at the Arcteryx Theta SV? Low bib shell with full side zips.

post #3 of 95

If you want burly check out the Patagonia Rubicon pants. I think it's marketed as a snowboard pant, but I didn't ever notice a difference. I've put 3 seasons of over 100 days on mine and they still look pretty closet new. No plans to replace yet anyway.

post #4 of 95

You probably never heard of Taiga Works, but my $300 Gortex bib pants (pretty sure they make non bib) have over 400 days and I have no thoughts or need for replacement. They come in different inseam lengths which was great for my short legs.

 

You need to check out Taiga Works on line mail order business because you won't find their clothing in stores except in Vancouver B.C. where they have a retail store and factory. Yes these garments are made in Canada. Instead of going to Asia to have the clothing made, they have a bunch of Asians designing, cutting, sewing, in a factory in Vancouver.

post #5 of 95
^^^^^. I second that! I had my Rubicon pants for 3 years and beat the living shit out of them not only skiing but also doing a lot of random work in them and they are bomber! Hadn't had one seam rip, zipper break, etc. Sadly I had to have them cut off in the Hospital last year but I will be purchasing another pair sometime in the near future. I wouldn't classify them as baggy at all. I think I had to buy an XL when i'm normally a large in most pants. They only come in black however. My Trew pants have also taken a serious beating and are very well constructed but they are a little baggier.
post #6 of 95

i would also strongly reccomend looking at the flylow stash & chemical pants.  i usually shred ski pants in 50-75 days, and have 200 days on my chemicals, which is still going strong, and 75+ on my stash pants and they are in excellent condition.  

 

they also have the best venting on the market, and fit perfectly.  

post #7 of 95

Flylow is a nice cheap option, I got 200 days before the inner cuff came a apart and they are warranty them....

 

Epic Patagonia looks more bomber though with the same sort of warranty.

post #8 of 95

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post

If you want burly check out the Patagonia Rubicon pants. I


^This.  The Rubicon is a seriously burly pant with a nice medium cut.  Burlier than the Primo.  

 

post #9 of 95
Thread Starter 

My impression of the Flylows is that they're pretty baggy compared to most pants. Would you agree?
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by msolson View Post

i would also strongly reccomend looking at the flylow stash & chemical pants.  i usually shred ski pants in 50-75 days, and have 200 days on my chemicals, which is still going strong, and 75+ on my stash pants and they are in excellent condition.  

 

they also have the best venting on the market, and fit perfectly.  



 

post #10 of 95
Thread Starter 

Those Klims look like they can stand up on their own! Curious why they label all of their gear as Performance Shell instead of Pro. Maybe GT charges more for the Pro designation?

 

Theta SV is too high of a bib for my taste. I have a Patagonia store nearby. Will check out the Primos today.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinecure View Post

Have you looked at the Klim snowmobile pants? I've sort of lusted after a pair of those for a while. Like Arcteryx (which I have an love right now), they offer lengths. www.klim.com

 

The others are the Patagonia Primo pant. I'm not sure if it is still available in their regular catalog, but it is still offered to ski patrol so you may be able to scare up a pair. They're bomber shell pants, not bibs.

 

You looked at the Arcteryx Theta SV? Low bib shell with full side zips.



 

post #11 of 95
Thread Starter 

Anyone with the Rubicon know the difference between H2No and GT?

post #12 of 95
Thread Starter 

Taiga sells a pair of GT Snow Pants for $159 that look pretty solid. Hard to tell without actually seeing them in person, but if they're as good as they look, that's a steal! Hard to imagine they're incredibly burly for that price, but who knows...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

You probably never heard of Taiga Works, but my $300 Gortex bib pants (pretty sure they make non bib) have over 400 days and I have no thoughts or need for replacement. They come in different inseam lengths which was great for my short legs.

 

You need to check out Taiga Works on line mail order business because you won't find their clothing in stores except in Vancouver B.C. where they have a retail store and factory. Yes these garments are made in Canada. Instead of going to Asia to have the clothing made, they have a bunch of Asians designing, cutting, sewing, in a factory in Vancouver.



 

post #13 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by rushbikes View Post

Anyone with the Rubicon know the difference between H2No and GT?



By GT, I assume you mean Gore-Tex. The H@No is more of a surface water repellent thing. If you ski in the rain, you will get wet in the Rubicon. If you don't, they'll keep you dry.

post #14 of 95
Thread Starter 

Will be using these pants in wet conditions at times, and for more than just skiing. Part of the reason I'm not keen on anything very baggy.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post



By GT, I assume you mean Gore-Tex. The H@No is more of a surface water repellent thing. If you ski in the rain, you will get wet in the Rubicon. If you don't, they'll keep you dry.



 

post #15 of 95

Well, I'd like them to be more waterproof than they are. They're good for a few hours on a rainy day, but in the end, you need more than a DWR if it keeps raining.

post #16 of 95

You can't go wrong with the Patagonia pants. Have used some version of them for the past couple of decades (three pair w/ ALOT of use both alpine and telemark). None seem to be parky jibby big, and they have the best warrantee of any retail business. 

post #17 of 95

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

You can't go wrong with the Patagonia pants. ... they have the best warrantee of any retail business. 


Which is to say (note to ^epic or any other potential Rubicon purchasers) if they aren't waterproof, they will warranty them.  Guaranteed waterproof.  

post #18 of 95
Thread Starter 

Anybody have any experience with the Patagonia Triolet pant?

post #19 of 95

Had the old Triolet pants... great stuff. They'd be near the top of my list if I were looking for new drawers for the PNW. I like that they still have the full length side zip, but that's a personal preference.

post #20 of 95

The chemical and Magnum pants from Flylow are pretty cut fit, the stash are baggy.

 

208413_1977102191273_1354674216_32353906_2772038_n.jpg

post #21 of 95

I've got a Flylow jacket and it is very tough, I'd assume the pants are nice too.  Ive had a set of Karbon pants for 4 years and they are still kicking strong.  Very durable I'd suggest trying those.

post #22 of 95

The Patagonia Rubicons have served me well.  I have 4 seasons on my pair, and they are still in great shape.  Not too baggy, but a relaxed fit and a trim waist.  Unlike most brands, Patagonia's sizing is actually as claimed; not designed for the stereotypical out-of-shape couch potato. 

 

I will buy another pair when these are gone. 

 

Scott

Full selection of 2014 skis available right now from Dawgcatching.com.  PM for current deals and discount codes: save up to 25% on mid-season deals. 

Reply
post #23 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

The Patagonia Rubicons have served me well.  I have 4 seasons on my pair, and they are still in great shape.  Not too baggy, but a relaxed fit and a trim waist.  Unlike most brands, Patagonia's sizing is actually as claimed; not designed for the stereotypical out-of-shape couch potato. 

 

I will buy another pair when these are gone. 

 

Scott



Hey now. Some of us are just built like linebackers. Try as I might to be a skinny cyclist, years of heavy lifting is hard to erase.

post #24 of 95

Just purchased some Patagonia (insulated, first time) Powder Bowl pants, Large.

Good fit, good length (6'2" 185# 34/34)  Arcteryx fits short for me, and the long

length (the one time i tried) adds girth? Good pockets setup, was impressed with

the cuffs, seem angled long in front, short to back (out of the way of binding heels?)

Will be super cold setup.  For the old Beta AR pants, i added 2" at cuffs.

post #25 of 95
Thread Starter 

 

Ok, so this has turned into a bit of an obsession for me... I've gone out and picked up 5 different pairs of Gore-Tex ski pants, and what have I learned? Not all Gore-Tex is created equal. I'm hoping that my little project benefits others on this forum. And thanks to everyone for your input so far!

 

First, a little education… For those who don't know, earning the Gore-Tex badge requires a very comprehensive process that every manufacturer looking to use their membrane has to go through. It begins with design proposals for a piece of gear from the mfr that GT must approve. All factories used must also be GT-certified. Once the design is approved (and GT will make suggestions on fabrics, design, etc), the mfr sends a prototype to GT's lab where they test it for a specific activity - ski gear are put through trials that simulate skiing - and based on the results, GT will label it appropriately - Pro Shell, Performance Shell, Soft Shell, Active Shell, etc. Before the final product goes to market, a final sample needs to be tested as well. It is worth noting that, while Pro Shell is considered the most serious gear, Soft Shell isn't necessarily inferior to Performance Shell in terms of durability, and in some cases, Performance Shell is just about on par with Pro Shell for most practical purposes.

 

Many of the pants were those mentioned in my original post. All pants tried on are a size Medium. My measurements are below…

Height: 5'11"

Weight: 156lbs

Waist: 32"

Inseam: 32”

 

The North Face Free Thinkers (GT Pro Shell):  These pants are insane. Definitely the most rugged feeling pants I've ever come across. And by far the baggiest. Fit & finish is well beyond what I had expected from TNF gear. The nylon strikes me as extremely durable, but not as stiff and crinkly as some of the other pants, as typical with top notch GT fabrics. Lots of nice features too. Plenty of pocket space with sealed zippers, super durable kick patches on the instep of the pant, also durable nylon patches on the instep of the gaiter, zippered thigh vents, thicker than usual felt on the inside of the waistband, Recco reflector and a waistband that tightens with large, sturdy velcro tabs. Comes with detachable suspenders that have a flap covering the small of your back as a small powder guard. I'm told this small flap can be unzipped and that small area of the waste can be attached to the matching jacket, but I'm not sure I see much of a benefit to this.

 

9913yv.jpg

 

2m7t9py.jpg

 

 

Norrona Narvik 3L (GT Perf Shell):  The cut of these were my personal favorites, narrower in the waist and upper leg with a slight flare to the calf to comfortably fit over your boot. Great design overall with articulated knees, pleated pockets so they stay flat when there's nothing in them, sealed zippers, zippered thigh vents, pretty large velcro tabs around the waist to cinch down the size, thin felt on the inside of the waistband and a reasonably rugged kick patch on the instep, although a far cry from those on the Free Thinkers. The fabric feels the most lightweight of these pants except the Soft Shell Sabres, and a little disappointing for a Performance Shell. The gaiters are also made out of a tightly woven mesh rather than a nylon that I imagine would wear & tear after not long. It might be a little odd to note, but these are very noisy pants. The kick pads make a ton of noise when they rub against each other and the fabric is the crinkliest of the bunch. Overall, I love how these pants are cut and designed, but the finish leaves me wanting something more.

 

o5zw37.jpg

 

1zyegjq.jpg

 

 

Patagonia Primo (GT Perf Shell):  As many have already mentioned, these things are bomber. I'm honestly surprised that these weren't rated Pro Shell. They're certainly priced like they are. These strike me as the second most durable pants of the bunch behind the Free Thinkers. These pants have a straighforward simplicity to them: a tiny non-descript Patagonia logo above the right knee embroidered in the same color as the pant, matte finish fabric, very clean seams with articulated knees and sealed zips that are also super clean and well thought out – the zips almost have a durable rubber quality to them rather than the typical glue laminate on the others. The material is very crinkly but the creases don't appear on the thicker fabric like they do on the Narvik so wrinkles are pretty smoothed out. The fit is on the baggier side for sure, but hardly in the same league as the Free Thinkers and some of the other pants I've seen on the mountain (mostly in the park). Other features include thin felt along the inside of the waistband, zippered thigh vents and durable gaiters. The kick patch on the instep of the pant strikes me as lightweight considering the rest of the fabrics used feel so durable. This instep material extends around the cuff of the pant as well which is a nice touch, which is to say that there is the instep kick patch and an inch high cuff of the same material. If you're looking for a cheaper version of this pant, the Powder Bowls are identical in a 2-layer fabric rather than 3-layer, and come with a wicking liner that the Primos don't have.

 

dzuqlg.jpg

 

6ntlz5.jpg

 

 

Patagonia Triolet (GT Perf Shell):  These pants are the mountaineering/touring equivalent of the Primos, and are really quite similar. The stark differences are the fit, the Triolets being much narrower, the full sealed side zips that allow you to take off the pants without taking off your boots in place of the vents, and the elastic waistband with a built-in belt. I love the way these fit as I can't stand hiking backcounty with baggy fitting pants, but a huge disclaimer, they fit super tight around the boot if you're wearing standard alpine ski boots and not touring or tele boots. Most of the fabrics are identical to the Primo, except the pants are sectioned such that the calf & quad quarters of the pant are a slightly lighter weight fabric than the shin and the butt/hamstring. The kick patch are made out of the same material as the Primo, but lack the inch-high cuff.

 

se3qfa.jpg

 

28jjuy8.jpg

 

 

Arcteryx Sabre (GT Soft Shell):  As a soft shell suggests, these are made of a very relaxed and supple fabric. They feel reasonably durable, but by touch alone, I can't imagine they'd stand up to the same abuse as the rest of the pants. Presumably they breathe considerably better though. Fit is about as baggy as the Primo though visually they don't appear this way as the fabric hangs rather than crinkles. I personally think the seam design and fabric make these pants very visually appealing. Features are four diagonal zip pockets, zippered thigh vents, Recco reflector and a thin felt liner that I wish more shells had. Unfortunately there are a couple features that I think fall short of the typical Arcteryx product: the waist has a dinky plastic belt buckle and the gaiter doesn't have a cinch or closure button. The kick patch would probably fair a bit better than the Primo’s, but not as well as the Free Thinkers, and for whatever reason, there were some color fading spots on the kick patch.

 

4rxquu.jpg

 

2567hxj.jpg

 

 

Conclusion:  To say that one pant is better than another in this test, or to even call this a test, would be incorrect and simply unfair. While all these pants retail for $400 – 450, they all have their unique characteristics that make them akin to comparing apples to oranges. Additionally, there are several other pants to consider if you’re in the market from brands like Westcomb, Outdoor Research, Mountain Hardwear, FlyLow, Trew, etc, in addition to other pants from the same brands in the test. That said, how boring would this thread be if I just ended on that note?

 

Flat out, if you’re looking for the most bombproof pant available, but don’t mind the super baggy fit, I can’t imagine there’s anything more bomber than the Free Thinker. Frankly, I’m so impressed with the fit, finish and features of this pant, I’m gonna go out a limb and say they offer the best bang for the buck as well, even at their $430 price tag - like comparing a Rolls Royce to a Mercedes if a RR were only a few grand more. The Primo is also an excellent option, with the Powder Bowl being an exceptionally good alternative for $100 less than the Primo. If you prefer a bib, you may want to consider the Arcteryx Stinger and Patagonia Super Alpine.

 

If a Soft Shell is your calling, I’d say the Sabre is one of your better options, but I’m not terribly familiar with the whole Soft Shell market.

 

If you’re into a narrower fit for mountaineer/touring, the Triolet would be my top choice. While I haven’t gotten my hands on one, I’ve heard great things about OR’s Mentor Pant, which is a Pro Shell.

 

And where does the Narvik fit in? Well, I’m not sure it’s quite fair to make a comparison. For a Performance Shell, it appears to me to fall short of the Primo in terms of quality and durability. But Norrona makes a line called the Lofoten, which has a Pro Shell that is supposed to be top notch, and a bib from the Trollveggen line that would probably rival the Free Thinker.

 


Edited by rushbikes - 11/30/11 at 8:06am
post #26 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

The Patagonia Rubicons have served me well.  I have 4 seasons on my pair, and they are still in great shape.  Not too baggy, but a relaxed fit and a trim waist.  Unlike most brands, Patagonia's sizing is actually as claimed; not designed for the stereotypical out-of-shape couch potato. 

 

I will buy another pair when these are gone. 

 

Scott


I resemble that remark...but I have a hard time finding pants that fit right especially in a color other than black.

 

post #27 of 95
Quote:
Originally Posted by rushbikes View Post

 

Ok, so this has turned into a bit of an obsession for me... I've gone out and picked up 5 different pairs of Gore-Tex ski pants, and what have I learned? Not all Gore-Tex is created equal. I'm hoping that my little project benefits others on this forum.

 

First, a little education… For those who don't know, earning the Gore-Tex badge requires a very comprehensive process that every manufacturer looking to use their membrane has to go through. It begins with design proposals for a piece of gear from the mfr that GT must approve. All factories used must also be GT-certified. Once the design is approved (and GT will make suggestions on fabrics, design, etc), the mfr sends a prototype to GT's lab where they test it for a specific activity - ski gear are put through trials that simulate skiing - and based on the results, GT will label it appropriately - Pro Shell, Performance Shell, Soft Shell, Active Shell, etc. Before the final product goes to market, a final sample needs to be tested as well. It is worth noting that, while Pro Shell is considered the most serious gear, Soft Shell isn't necessarily inferior to Performance Shell in terms of durability, and in some cases, Performance Shell is just about on par with Pro Shell for most practical purposes.

 

Many of the pants were those mentioned in my original post. All pants tried on are a size Medium. My measurements are below…

Height: 5'11"

Weight: 156lbs

Waist: 32"

Inseam: 32”

 

The North Face Free Thinkers (GT Pro Shell):  These pants are insane. Definitely the most rugged feeling pants I've ever come across. And by far the baggiest. Fit & finish is well beyond what I had expected from TNF gear. The nylon strikes me as extremely durable, but not as stiff and crinkly as some of the other pants, as typical with top notch GT fabrics. Lots of nice features too. Plenty of pocket space with sealed zippers, super durable kick patches on the instep of the pant, also durable nylon patches on the instep of the gaiter, zippered thigh vents, thicker than usual felt on the inside of the waistband, Recco reflector and a waistband that tightens with large, sturdy velcro tabs. Comes with detachable suspenders that have a flap covering the small of your back as a small powder guard. I'm told this small flap can be unzipped and that small area of the waste can be attached to the matching jacket, but I'm not sure I see much of a benefit to this.

 

9913yv.jpg

 

2m7t9py.jpg

 

 

Norrona Narvik 3L (GT Perf Shell):  The cut of these were my personal favorites, narrower in the waist and upper leg with a slight flare to the calf to comfortably fit over your boot. Great design overall with articulated knees, pleated pockets so they stay flat when there's nothing in them, sealed zippers, zippered thigh vents, pretty large velcro tabs around the waist to cinch down the size, thin felt on the inside of the waistband and a reasonably rugged kick patch on the instep, although a far cry from those on the Free Thinkers. The fabric feels the most lightweight of these pants except the Soft Shell Sabres, and a little disappointing for a Performance Shell. The gaiters are also made out of a tightly woven mesh rather than a nylon that I imagine would wear & tear after not long. It might be a little odd to note, but these are very noisy pants. The kick pads make a ton of noise when they rub against each other and the fabric is the crinkliest of the bunch. Overall, I love how these pants are cut and designed, but the finish leaves me wanting something more.

 

o5zw37.jpg

 

1zyegjq.jpg

 

 

Patagonia Primo (GT Perf Shell):  As many have already mentioned, these things are bomber. I'm honestly surprised that these weren't rated Pro Shell. They're certainly priced like they are. These strike me as the second most durable pants of the bunch behind the Free Thinkers. These pants have a straighforward simplicity to them: a tiny non-descript Patagonia logo above the right knee embroidered in the same color as the pant, matte finish fabric, very clean seams with articulated knees and sealed zips that are also super clean and well thought out – the zips almost have a durable rubber quality to them rather than the typical glue laminate on the others. The material is very crinkly but the creases don't appear on the thicker fabric like they do on the Narvik so wrinkles are pretty smoothed out. The fit is on the baggier side for sure, but hardly in the same league as the Free Thinkers and some of the other pants I've seen on the mountain (mostly in the park). Other features include thin felt along the inside of the waistband, zippered thigh vents and durable gaiters. The kick patch on the instep of the pant strikes me as lightweight considering the rest of the fabrics used feel so durable. This instep material extends around the cuff of the pant as well which is a nice touch, which is to say that there is the instep kick patch and an inch high cuff of the same material. If you're looking for a cheaper version of this pant, the Powder Bowls are identical in a 2-layer fabric rather than 3-layer, and come with a wicking liner that the Primos don't have.

 

dzuqlg.jpg

 

6ntlz5.jpg

 

 

Patagonia Triolet (GT Perf Shell):  These pants are the mountaineering/touring equivalent of the Primos, and are really quite similar. The stark differences are the fit, the Triolets being much narrower, the full sealed side zips that allow you to take off the pants without taking off your boots in place of the vents, and the elastic waistband with a built-in belt. I love the way these fit as I can't stand hiking backcounty with baggy fitting pants, but a huge disclaimer, they fit super tight around the boot if you're wearing standard alpine ski boots and not touring or tele boots. Most of the fabrics are identical to the Primo, except the pants are sectioned such that the calf & quad quarters of the pant are a slightly lighter weight fabric than the shin and the butt/hamstring. The kick patch are made out of the same material as the Primo, but lack the inch-high cuff.

 

se3qfa.jpg

 

28jjuy8.jpg

 

 

Arcteryx Sabre (GT Soft Shell):  As a soft shell suggests, these are made of a very relaxed and supple fabric. They feel reasonably durable, but by touch alone, I can't imagine they'd stand up to the same abuse as the rest of the pants. Presumably they breathe considerably better though. Fit is about as baggy as the Primo though visually they don't appear this way as the fabric hangs rather than crinkles. I personally think the seam design and fabric make these pants very visually appealing. Features are four diagonal zip pockets, zippered thigh vents, Recco reflector and a thin felt liner that I wish more shells had. Unfortunately there are a couple features that I think fall short of the typical Arcteryx product: the waist has a dinky plastic belt buckle and the gaiter doesn't have a cinch or closure button. The kick patch would probably fair a bit better than the Primo’s, but not as well as the Free Thinkers, and for whatever reason, there were some color fading spots on the kick patch.

 

4rxquu.jpg

 

2567hxj.jpg

 

 

Conclusion:  To say that one pant is better than another in this test, or to even call this a test, would be incorrect and simply unfair. While all these pants retail for $400 – 450, they all have their unique characteristics that make them akin to comparing apples to oranges. Additionally, there are several other pants to consider if you’re in the market from brands like Westcomb, Outdoor Research, Mountain Hardwear, FlyLow, Trew, etc, in addition to other pants from the same brands in the test. That said, how boring would this thread be if I just ended on that note?

 

Flat out, if you’re looking for the most bombproof pant available, but don’t mind the super baggy fit, I can’t imagine there’s anything more bomber than the Free Thinker. Frankly, I’m so impressed with the fit, finish and features of this pant, I’m gonna go out a limb and say they offer the best bang for the buck as well, even at their $430 price tag - like comparing a Rolls Royce to a Mercedes if a RR were only a few grand more. The Primo is also an excellent option, with the Powder Bowl being an exceptionally good alternative for $100 less than the Primo. If you prefer a bib, you may want to consider the Arcteryx Stinger and Patagonia Super Alpine.

 

If a Soft Shell is your calling, I’d say the Sabre is one of your better options, but I’m not terribly familiar with the whole Soft Shell market.

 

If you’re into a narrower fit for mountaineer/touring, the Triolet would be my top choice. While I haven’t gotten my hands on one, I’ve heard great things about OR’s Mentor Pant, which is a Pro Shell.

 

And where does the Narvik fit in? Well, I’m not sure it’s quite fair to make a comparison. For a Performance Shell, it appears to me to fall short of the Primo in terms of quality and durability. But Norrona makes a line called the Lofoten, which has a Pro Shell that is supposed to be top notch, and a bib from the Trollveggen line that would probably rival the Free Thinker.

 



So you spent 2k on black/grey boring pants that are all functionally the same? And I see that one of your biggest worries is the kick patch. A feature that quite honestly shouldn't be a huge issue if your skiing with a modern stance. Are you going to be doing much more than resort skiing? If not I think you are over thinking pants.

post #28 of 95
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post



So you spent 2k on black/grey boring pants that are all functionally the same? And I see that one of your biggest worries is the kick patch. A feature that quite honestly shouldn't be a huge issue if your skiing with a modern stance. Are you going to be doing much more than resort skiing? If not I think you are over thinking pants.



Close to 3k, actually, and it was with the intent of giving myself a hands-on education before replacing a pair of 6-year old pants that are duct-taped and shredded. I just thought I'd share some of what I've learned with the greater masses in hopes someone out there finds an inkling of helpful knowledge buried within. Did I go overboard? Heck yeah! Fortunately all the pants are returnable.

 

As for the kick patch, that was the first spot that fell apart on my last pair. Maybe it's partly my stance? Maybe it's the constant brushing of my boots against each other hiking in back or sidecountry? Who knows. But it's clearly an issue for me.

post #29 of 95

From your original post:

 

>>> Arcteryx Stinger (GT Pro Shell):  Love'em. Not a fan of a full bib.

 

Love mine too. They're totally bomber, perfectly featured, fit great (come in lengths) and available in three colors (alledgedly anyway). I'm wearing mine until I croak and beyond. I'll be bombproof and stylin' in my casket!

 

Why not buy a pair and have them converted to pants? A skilled tailor could cut off the back panel and suspenders, finish off the top nicely and install a belted or elastic waistband. Voila!

 

post #30 of 95

From your original post:

 

>>> Arcteryx Stinger (GT Pro Shell):  Love'em. Not a fan of a full bib.

 

Love mine too. They're totally bomber, perfectly featured, fit great (come in lengths) and available in three colors (alledgedly anyway). I'm wearing mine until I croak and beyond. I'll be bombproof and stylin' in my casket!

 

Why not buy a pair and have them converted to pants? A skilled tailor could cut off the back panel and suspenders, finish off the top nicely and install a belted or elastic waistband. Voila!

 

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