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Binding Hole Plugs

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I'm planning on remounting the plate and bindings on a few pairs of skis. I've never done this before and am wondering if anyone knows if wood hole plugs or plastic hole plugs work better. All of the skis I'm remounting are GS race skis with wood cores and two sheets of titanal. Any other tips on redrilling or tools/equipment needed would also be appreciated.

post #2 of 18

For what it is worth I use epoxy that hardens on the rubbery side. I haven't had a problem yet. I'm interested in what others use.

post #3 of 18
post #4 of 18

I use epoxy on my mounts and TiteBond III and golf tee to fill holes.

post #5 of 18

Artech and race Place have hole plugs.. Check them out.

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for pulling up the old thread Scavenger. I think I'll give the wood plugs a try. I don't have any epoxy or glue lying around that will hold up to snow and water/moisture so I suppose I'll order the official glue that whatever store I go with has, although I'm curious how different it really is from more general products.

post #7 of 18

The plastic plugs are a lot easier to work with than the wood ones.

post #8 of 18
post #9 of 18

Plastic plugs are easy and work great. Your larger concern is drilling without a jig(unless you have one) getting the right step bit (4.1x9.5) for a metal top sheet, and tapping the holes after you drill. It's a standard job at a shop for $40.00, but it's REALLY hard to get your holes lined up right without a jig. Good Luck.

post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerkski View Post

Plastic plugs are easy and work great. Your larger concern is drilling without a jig(unless you have one) getting the right step bit (4.1x9.5) for a metal top sheet, and tapping the holes after you drill. It's a standard job at a shop for $40.00, but it's REALLY hard to get your holes lined up right without a jig. Good Luck.



No it isn't if you're handy with tools.  There's paper templates available if you search online for them.  But all I've ever used was hand clamps and the plastic base plates that go under the bindings.  Line em up with your boot and mid sole mark/selected mount +1 +2 whatever, toes first.   Mark, clamp, drill, mount the toes then work on the heels.  But if you fear ruining your skis, which can very likely happen, then take them to the shop like most folks do.

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

The plastic plugs are a lot easier to work with than the wood ones.

Yep, they work great and dont absorb moisture like wood ones potentially could do. I use silicon rather than epoxy to completely seal and anchor them.
 

 

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

On doing the drilling, I don't have a jig. I think I should be able to be fairly accurate with placing the location of the holes, but are there any tricks to ensure I get the depth right? I imagine I'll measure the depth of the original holes and then put a piece of masking tape on the drill bit so I know how deep to go. But, considering I could trash the skis by screwing up, I want to make sure I'm doing this right.

post #13 of 18

Don't use tape. I use a plastic spacer or rubber tubing (hose) as a depth limiter on the drill bit. (Long enough so it contacts the three jaws in the drill chuck.) So that only the amount of the drill bit exposed is the same as your max depth. I've run through tape before and gone to deep on other things. The top sheets can be tough and the cores are soft on some skis. You get through the top sheet and....Oh Crap!

post #14 of 18

I use a drill press with a measured stop. Pre-drill on scrap skis or lumber and measure for the correct depth. Go slow, check work often, use compressed air to blow out sawdust.

Agree on using the base plates as templates - works fine.

 

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjp5 View Post

On doing the drilling, I don't have a jig. I think I should be able to be fairly accurate with placing the location of the holes, but are there any tricks to ensure I get the depth right? I imagine I'll measure the depth of the original holes and then put a piece of masking tape on the drill bit so I know how deep to go. But, considering I could trash the skis by screwing up, I want to make sure I'm doing this right.



Masking tape gets sloppy after a while.

You can always take a 5/32" bit and simply epoxy a nut at a 9mm depth.

post #16 of 18

Just get a dedicated drill stop. They are cheap and effective. Tape compresses, epoxy is permanent. A drill press stop is great, but there may be variability in the thickness of the ski.

post #17 of 18

I used to use the plastic plugs specifically for skis, but was always losing them. Now I just hang onto any plastic golf tees that I find during the summer and use those with some gorilla glue or epoxy. I have never had a problem with any these after several remounts.

post #18 of 18

Whoa -- nice 4 year necro-bump.

 

I filled my first holes last night. The plastic plugs included with a binding mounting kit went in pretty easily. I used SVST Binding Mount and Filling glue to keep them in place. All and all, at least a good enough job for my rock skis. 

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