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Fat, rockered ski that will still be functional in the East

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

Currently on a pair of Gotamas right now (non-rockered, the pink buddha version)  that I love to death, but i'm looking for something new and more forgiving in softer, deeper snow. Last year in Whistler, I demoed some S7s along with some other rockered skis and instantly fell in love. My wife did the same and ended up buying a pair of Kikus.

 

I have no doubts that I would love any of the fatter, rockered skis out west, but my concern is with functionality on harder, more eastern type snow. We were blessed with fresh snow and more or less soft conditions in our trip to Whistler, so I never got to try these skis on true hardpack. I don't do a lot of skiing back here in the east, but if I do i'd like the new boards to at least be functional. I still have a pair of Salomon GC Race skis from a few years back if I *really* want to rail. 

 

Can anyone make some recommendations for skis that will fit what i'm looking for? On my radar right now are the S7's (REALLY liked them) and Nordica Patron (seem right up my alley) which I can pick up on pro form. Anything else I should be looking at? Or should I be looking at a completely different category of ski? 

 

About me:

6'0 170lbs

Aggressive skier, but not a real charger per se (ie. no big air)

Looking for a ski that isn't a whole lot of work

post #2 of 25

I like the Patron a lot (go 185), the S7 will work but the 188cm 'super7' might be better due to it's metal layer. There are plenty of very good choices out there, but the 2 you've mentioned are really, really good.

post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

I like the Patron a lot (go 185), the S7 will work but the 188cm 'super7' might be better due to it's metal layer. There are plenty of very good choices out there, but the 2 you've mentioned are really, really good.



Thanks. I've read almost nothing but positive things about the Patron which is why it is on my radar. The Super 7 might be a good idea, but I worry that the metal layer(s?) will add weight and compromise the S7's performance (stiffer) in really soft snow. Even though I live in the East right now, my wife and I are moving out West so the tables will turn come next fall.

 

In your opinion, is the S7 or the Patron better on the groomed?

post #4 of 25

Why not just hang onto the Gotama's that you love so much for your occasional days back east and just get the ski you would prefer skiing out west?

 

Good luck,

 

Rick

post #5 of 25

How much width do you need?  Something like the Bonafide seems like a much better choice than the Super 7 (which is a fun ski, but needs new snow to excel) in your typical skiing conditions, as you aren't likely to see that much new snow, but you didn't state a width range. There are narrower skis that are still rockered as well, like the TST, which would out-ski a super wide ski in Eastern conditions.  I have a couple of 120mm+ skis that I use, but both are more work than fun for what I assume would be your typical day out East. 

post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

How much width do you need?  Something like the Bonafide seems like a much better choice than the Super 7 (which is a fun ski, but needs new snow to excel) in your typical skiing conditions, as you aren't likely to see that much new snow, but you didn't state a width range. There are narrower skis that are still rockered as well, like the TST, which would out-ski a super wide ski in Eastern conditions.  I have a couple of 120mm+ skis that I use, but both are more work than fun for what I assume would be your typical day out East. 


I was hoping you would see this thread!

 

I think anything 120mm+ would really be pushing it for functionality back east. Given that my current Goats are ~100mm in width, I was looking to go with something in the ~110mm range with some rocker. I read the review you recent posted for skis in that width and will check out the Blizzard Cochise or Bonafide and the Elan Olympus Mons. How do these skis compare with the S7 and Patron?

 

post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickg View Post

Why not just hang onto the Gotama's that you love so much for your occasional days back east and just get the ski you would prefer skiing out west?

 

Good luck,

 

Rick



Not a bad idea, but I really want to keep two pairs of skis max... one being the GS skis, the other as kind of an all-around pair.

post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 

Wow, after reading the review below I am leaning HARD towards a pair of Rossignol Sickle in 186.

 

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/review-2011-2012-rossignol-sickle-2010-2011-rossignol-s6-186cm

 

Has anyone else skied on these this year? I believe they are the same (similar?) to the S6's from last year.

post #9 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by N8M View Post

Wow, after reading the review below I am leaning HARD towards a pair of Rossignol Sickle in 186.

 

http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/review-2011-2012-rossignol-sickle-2010-2011-rossignol-s6-186cm

 

Has anyone else skied on these this year? I believe they are the same (similar?) to the S6's from last year.

I can only give you a second hand opinion. My son skis on last years S6 (identical to the Sickle BTW) as his one ski quiver in the east (mostly bumps and trees). He is 5'8", 180 lb. but a very, very good and fast skier. He has access to many other skis, but just loves them. Now he does generate very high edge angles on groomers (aka ice) and says that while a true carver would be better of course, the S6 is fine and he likes the ski so much that he does not care. Now I could not accomplish what he does on that ski on ice, so YMMV. But a pretty good testimonial I would say.
 

 

post #10 of 25
I bought a pair of S7s towards then end of last year and tried them out on hard frontside snow. I was very impressed with how well I could carve an edge and how fast I could turn. Obviously performance wasn't comparable with a race ski but the flexibility of this ski is awesome. The rockers flap about like crazy but the mid part of the ski is pretty stable. The only thing I can't comment about is whether it cuts it in bumps since my local hill doesn't have much in the way of moguls. I even considered running a (not very serious) GS race with them as a joke but unfortunately I couldn't make the race so I never found out quite what they could do :-)

I'm about your weight and I don't think you should consider the super 7. The S7 is quite stiff enough for a fun ride on a hard piste and as already mentioned the extra weight of the metal layer and additional stiffness would spoil performance in powder.

mark
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by allan o'neil View Post

I can only give you a second hand opinion. My son skis on last years S6 (identical to the Sickle BTW) as his one ski quiver in the east (mostly bumps and trees). He is 5'8", 180 lb. but a very, very good and fast skier. He has access to many other skis, but just loves them. Now he does generate very high edge angles on groomers (aka ice) and says that while a true carver would be better of course, the S6 is fine and he likes the ski so much that he does not care. Now I could not accomplish what he does on that ski on ice, so YMMV. But a pretty good testimonial I would say.
 

 



Great to hear! What length does he ski on? I'm looking at the 186 as the 174 would be WAY too small methinks.

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hyperkub View Post

I bought a pair of S7s towards then end of last year and tried them out on hard frontside snow. I was very impressed with how well I could carve an edge and how fast I could turn. Obviously performance wasn't comparable with a race ski but the flexibility of this ski is awesome. The rockers flap about like crazy but the mid part of the ski is pretty stable. The only thing I can't comment about is whether it cuts it in bumps since my local hill doesn't have much in the way of moguls. I even considered running a (not very serious) GS race with them as a joke but unfortunately I couldn't make the race so I never found out quite what they could do :-)
I'm about your weight and I don't think you should consider the super 7. The S7 is quite stiff enough for a fun ride on a hard piste and as already mentioned the extra weight of the metal layer and additional stiffness would spoil performance in powder.
mark


Thanks for the input Mark, I agree about the S7 vs SS7 debate.

 

And BTW, I dusted a few guys on the free GS course on Blackcomb last year using my Goats. biggrin.gif

post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 

Ahhh!

 

Now i've come across a good deal on a pair of '11 Goats. Given that they have a good amount of rocker, maybe I should just stick with the devil I know and buy those? th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #14 of 25

I think having an everyday ski in the east that is 100-110 wide for most people is really dumb. I think its a quiver ski for day when there is enough snow to float on.

 

For instance a S7 is a great powder day ski for the east, its is quick and turny but I feel it kinda of sucks on hardpack. Where as the Bonafide is sometimes actually to skinny for really big dumps but does do really well on hardpack.

 

I say have a 90-100 and like a 110-120. Its a great 2 ski quiver for a mostly off trail skier.

 

 

 

 

post #15 of 25

I was really worried there for a minute that I actually agreed with bush....till I got to the 90-100mm for daily driver part...(he did say mostly off trail skier though)

 

Last year was a wonderful change of pace in snow quantity in the Northeast. But for what I'd call an average year, most days I wouldn't want to be over 85mm and to be even having more fun, I'm usually in the 70-82mm range. That's why around here a 3 ski quiver is what I would call bare bones. Conditions vary much more than out west. Damn freeze/thaw cycles and unpredictable natual snow/sleet/rain.....having the right tool keeps the grin factor up and conditions can change by the day (or even hour)

post #16 of 25

Take a look at the 190 DPS Wailer 112RP. They'll be better on hardpack than the S7s, and will perform almost equally well in powder.

post #17 of 25

He already has a 105mm everyday ski... wink.gif

 

To me the fact that the OP thinks the old Gotamas are not forgiving enough in pow means he wants something powder specific / buy a turn in deep snow. He also wants the ski to be as good on hardpack. Unfortunately anything that is going to be significantly better in deep snow is also going to be a big compromise in hardpack. In fact I don't think the OG Gotama were all that great in hard snow either.

 

Suggest getting a narrow ski for hard snow and a wider more forgiving ski for deep snow. $.02.

 

 

post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

He already has a 105mm everyday ski... wink.gif

 

To me the fact that the OP thinks the old Gotamas are not forgiving enough in pow means he wants something powder specific / buy a turn in deep snow. He also wants the ski to be as good on hardpack. Unfortunately anything that is going to be significantly better in deep snow is also going to be a big compromise in hardpack. In fact I don't think the OG Gotama were all that great in hard snow either.

 

Suggest getting a narrow ski for hard snow and a wider more forgiving ski for deep snow. $.02.

 

 


You have hit the nail on the head. I have no problems with the OG Gotama on harder snow, so I guess I won't be giving much away by getting something moderately wider. After much mulling about, I am 99% sure that i'll end up going with the S6 Jib from last year. The combination of low price and some glowing reviews have me pretty excited about the ski. They indicate that it is very versatile, from great float in the pow with it's slight rocker to decent hardpack performance.

 

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

I was really worried there for a minute that I actually agreed with bush....till I got to the 90-100mm for daily driver part...(he did say mostly off trail skier though)

 

Last year was a wonderful change of pace in snow quantity in the Northeast. But for what I'd call an average year, most days I wouldn't want to be over 85mm and to be even having more fun, I'm usually in the 70-82mm range. That's why around here a 3 ski quiver is what I would call bare bones. Conditions vary much more than out west. Damn freeze/thaw cycles and unpredictable natual snow/sleet/rain.....having the right tool keeps the grin factor up and conditions can change by the day (or even hour)



I really do not push big skis on people unless what they are doing requires or is made easier by big skis. Just because a fatter ski works on hardpack does not make it ideal.

 

If I owned 2 skis it would be like 98 mm skis and 110mm ski, if I had 3 I would probablt add the Head ititan or Blizzard 8.1.

 

 

 

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

I was really worried there for a minute that I actually agreed with bush....till I got to the 90-100mm for daily driver part...(he did say mostly off trail skier though)

 

Last year was a wonderful change of pace in snow quantity in the Northeast. But for what I'd call an average year, most days I wouldn't want to be over 85mm and to be even having more fun, I'm usually in the 70-82mm range. That's why around here a 3 ski quiver is what I would call bare bones. Conditions vary much more than out west. Damn freeze/thaw cycles and unpredictable natual snow/sleet/rain.....having the right tool keeps the grin factor up and conditions can change by the day (or even hour)


 

For some reason, I thought you had a Kastle RX12?  Seems like that would be pretty sick ski for your neck of the woods.  I was shocked at how good it was in bumps when I skied it at Snowbasin.  

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



I really do not push big skis on people unless what they are doing requires or is made easier by big skis. Just because a fatter ski works on hardpack does not make it ideal.

 

If I owned 2 skis it would be like 98 mm skis and 110mm ski, if I had 3 I would probablt add the Head ititan or Blizzard 8.1.

 

 

 

Sounds like my "Western" quiver!  Still mostly off-piste oriented for me as well. 

 

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post


 

For some reason, I thought you had a Kastle RX12?  Seems like that would be pretty sick ski for your neck of the woods.  I was shocked at how good it was in bumps when I skied it at Snowbasin.  



I have been wondering. When you tested the the Dynastar course Ti last year, you made no mention of its bump performance. Now that you said what you did about the RX in bumps, can  you comment on the Corse Ti in bumps?

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post

For some reason, I thought you had a Kastle RX12?  Seems like that would be pretty sick ski for your neck of the woods.  I was shocked at how good it was in bumps when I skied it at Snowbasin.  



Yes, I have the RX in the quiver too.... Actually, my hardsnow end of the quiver includes;

 

Progressor 9+

RX

Course Ti

Supersonic

4x4

R9X WC Oversize

Mag 8.1

(one for each day of the week wink.gif)

 

 

 

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by allan o'neil View Post



I have been wondering. When you tested the the Dynastar course Ti last year, you made no mention of its bump performance. Now that you said what you did about the RX in bumps, can  you comment on the Corse Ti in bumps?


I didn't ski the Course Ti in bumps.  Sorry. 

post #25 of 25

Talk about a thread digression-how the heck did the Dynastar Course Ti get multiple postings in a thread about fat rockered skis?biggrin.gif

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