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Do you try to keep your skis from being damaged when you ski?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

How far will you go to save them?

Will you nearly fall in a tough spot to miss a rock? I'm guilty of that sometimes. can make a hard line harder.

Will you skip an otherwise good line to avoid possibly trashing your edges?

Will  you take off your skis to cross 50 feet of rock, getting dropped by the group in doing so?

etc, etc.

Well aware, skis are tools, use them, and so on. but they're not as good a tool when damaged.

I use my rock skis too much. hey, life's too short for rock skis!

post #2 of 29

Depends on which skis, and for the ones that don't get the kid glove treatment, it depends on how old they are. 

Examples: my Kästle SGs only see snow or ice, and these days I am careful not to go full speed through moguls (I didn't even consider that I could damage them back when I weighed a lot less, and skied faster).

 

When my P50s were new, I would avoid the mogul run unless there was enough snow to cover all the gravel between the moguls.  Now that the skis have a couple of scars on them, and I've decided they are too flexible for serious hard charging, I don't care so much, I'm skiing whatever, and will fill in the new wounds as needed.  If the skis get ruined I will just have to find another pair, or make do with whatever I can find to put on.

 

My Volant  Machetes are still going to avoid getting scratched up.

 

I won't worry so much about the bases of my WC SCs if I ski them (my son's got them now), but I still will be careful not to rip an edge out.

 

 

 

post #3 of 29

Not really. I avoid rocky snow because I don't want to get hurt, not becuase I am worried about my skis. If I happen to hit a rock and damage aski but am ok otherwise, its no big deal.

post #4 of 29

I may be in the minority but I don't go out of my way to avoid rocks and such. Sure I don't like what happens to my bases sometimes but I find the skiing worth the cost.

post #5 of 29

I hate to knick my bases up, so I am always waiting for a lot more coverage than the guys that hit it early in the season.

post #6 of 29

I never really think about that when skiing.

 

Before I go out, if I know the conditions are going to be terrible or something, I might not take certain pairs of my skis.

 

 

Like others have said, if I didn't ski over crappy terrain/rocks it wouldn't be because I wanted to preserve the skis, it would be because doing so is not fun and possibly dangerous.

post #7 of 29

I try to avoid hitting things within reason, but I don't go to any of the measures that you posted. If I hit a rock I hit a rock, just fix them up.

post #8 of 29

There are two types of skis....rock skis and skis yet to be mounted. Like Tyler, I will try to avoid things, but not at the risk of other things. 

post #9 of 29

There are definately situations in which you have to take a hit to the bases, like when dropping into a tight shoot at bridger bowl or shooting a gap in the trees at mad river, etc.  i try not to be skidding over an immobile rock as blowing out an edge is likely the end to a several hundred dollar investment. instead, if its unavoidable i try to run the rock somewhat lengthwise down the ski rather than into the metal edge as it makes for an easier and more resilient p-tex job.  If i am not in a double black situation (e.g. narrow chute off challenger lift at big sky) i can and do usually take evasive action to avoid rocks  regardless of what i am skiing on.  Early season conditions cause me to leave newer skis at home.

post #10 of 29

It doesn't bother me too much to hit rocks on my bases -- usually pretty minor stuff that doesn't even need to be fixed (if it doesn't go to the core, it's just structure, right?)

I do get annoyed when I do a hockey stop in the wrong place (or am just skiing badly) and whack my edges.

After one early season thin cover day I was perversely pleased to see an 18" long scratch down one of my bases that never touched the edges.

post #11 of 29

Quote:

Originally Posted by mdf View Post

... if it doesn't go to the core, it's just structure, right?

 

biggrin.gif

 

 

I have rock skis and 'good' skis, but they tend to blend together after the first couple of rock strikes, which are unavoidable.  Next season there's going to be a changing of the guard.

 

In bad seasons one of our busiest cat tracks has a small, slightly prominent rock and the reaction from the person next to you when they hit it definitely tells you if they're on rentals or not.

 

There's a "lean way back and gather speed" technique hereabouts to cover the occasional stretch of grass, although I've heard stories about ligament tweaks and I'll go out of my way to stay on the snow.

 

Put me in the conservative camp for this one.  I put enough time into bases and edges to be circumspect.

post #12 of 29

Ive got nothing but rock skis right now, but will be buying some new skis in december and hopefully we will have enough snow by then. Im not too careful with the rock skis, ive been taking some runs at a shut down ski area 10 miles from town, and have rocked the skis a few times, but its starting to fill in pretty well and didnt hit any rocks today. On new skis, I dont ski anything that even has the possibility of a rock or stump or dirt, unfortunately I cracked a tip out on my nice skis last year, time for new boards.

post #13 of 29

I'll skip an otherwise tasty line if it looks like I'll end up doing a few rock turns.  Once committed, though, ya just gotta make those rocks your bitch.

post #14 of 29



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View PostHow far will you go to save them?

Will you nearly fall in a tough spot to miss a rock? I'm guilty of that sometimes. can make a hard line harder.

Will you skip an otherwise good line to avoid possibly trashing your edges?

Will  you take off your skis to cross 50 feet of rock, getting dropped by the group in doing so?

etc, etc.

Well aware, skis are tools, use them, and so on. but they're not as good a tool when damaged.

I use my rock skis too much. hey, life's too short for rock skis!



davluri.......I'm surprised at you......

 

Would you use this beautiful  4-1/2 to scrape off glue?

 

4_5Shavings[1].jpg

 

I ski on snow......not rocks. I have no "rock" skis....  nonono2.gif

 


Edited by Rossi Smash - 11/21/11 at 6:53am
post #15 of 29

I do most of the damage to my skis from bashing my skis together while skiing and i am not even aware of it while skiing.th_dunno-1[1].gif I'm a strong skier but not a stylish skier. Of course this damage is to the ski's top sheet but on some of my skis the nicks are so bad that i can see pieces of fibre glass cloth exposed. The solution for me is too buy skis with a metal top layer. The bonus is that I can easily tell which ski is "right" and which is "left" by the scuffed up inside top edge on each ski.

post #16 of 29

I always try to avoid rocks. If conditions are bad I'll ski on my oldest pair. When I get a scratch I'll p-tex and do basework as needed. I don't worry about the top sheets, but the bases on all my skis are more or less perfect. I never ski vintage skis in rocky conditions.

post #17 of 29

I try to avoid lines with rocks in the them but sometimes you get a surprise.  I think I would have a hard time convincing myself to take my skis off and walk but I guess the situation would dictate the response.  Fortunately rocks are very very rare at the local hill.

post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 

my edges used to cut up all my pants cuffs. I got custom footbeds and that never happened again. meaning: footbeds improve stance and correct width of feet in the stance.

 

for me it is dependent which skis I have. narrow waisted skis are useless to me if dull. fat skis it doesn't matter. rock skis are a good solution only if you can enjoy the way they ski. it's worth a couple hundred to me to keep them around rather than sell a good old pair.

 

RS, what surprises you about my ramblings on the topic? let's see, proper use of tools...(difficulty 1-5, 1 easiest) a run that is a 4 will be a 5 if you try not to hit any rocks sometimes. the more days you ski a year, the more you have to conserve your edges or the cumulative damage will get beyond usefulness for firm conditions.

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



 



davluri.......I'm surprised at you......

 

Would you use this beautiful  4-1/2 to scrape off glue?

 

4_5Shavings[1].jpg

 

 

 



 

Nah, he's got  a big #8 jointer for  glue tongue.gif
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

my edges used to cut up all my pants cuffs. I got custom footbeds and that never happened again. meaning: footbeds improve stance and correct width of feet in the stance.

 

 

Next question: does how much you bang up the /tops/ of your skis change with their sidecut?

post #20 of 29
My personal well being comes first, but I won't go looking for rocks.
post #21 of 29
Thread Starter 

It doesn't affect anything. It really is the ski running true on the snow that keeps it from running in toward the other ski, in my experience. based on using all my skis and not cutting the pants, (I have never had the skis running on each other enough to cause top sheet damage, except some slight abrasion along the tip. must be some old habits, really old, kick in at some times in chop and crud, where I find a closed stance useful if it's particularly cruddy. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post



 

Nah, he's got  a big #8 jointer for  glue tongue.gif
 

 

 

Next question: does how much you bang up the /tops/ of your skis change with their sidecut?



 

post #22 of 29
Thread Starter 

I did use a $20K Felder to mill down wood from the forest, for my line of rustic arts and crafts style furniture. I'd clamp it to a sliding table and run it through the saw to get a straight edge to work from. a chip came off a split section of log and was glowing red hot. the dust collector immeditately sucked it into the hamper and applied 5hp of high speed blown air to the hot chip of wood, which in turn instantly caused it to flame up, which then became a 24" flame shooting out the side of the collection bag. I was in the middle of the cut looking at the flame blowing sideways across the shop. turn off the saw, yes, no, turn off the dust collector, holly crap. close one. using tools for their not intended  purpose can turn out ugly is the moral, guilty as charged. haha.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



 



davluri.......I'm surprised at you......

 

Would you use this beautiful  4-1/2 to scrape off glue?

 

4_5Shavings[1].jpg

 

I ski on snow......not rocks. I have no "rock" skis....  nonono2.gif

 



 

post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 


Is there a welder that can be used to fill deep scratches in the edges? do you work at a shop? affects the equation if you do, compared to civilians I mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

I try to avoid hitting things within reason, but I don't go to any of the measures that you posted. If I hit a rock I hit a rock, just fix them up.



 

post #24 of 29



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Is there a welder that can be used to fill deep scratches in the edges? do you work at a shop? affects the equation if you do, compared to civilians I mean.

 



In theory they could be TIG welded but I've never actually heard of anyone having it done...

 

post #25 of 29

Do I try to keep my skis from being damaged when I ski?

 

Yep.

 

I know my local hill and will avoid runs that tend to have rocks when the snow in not thick enough.

 

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

 

Next question: does how much you bang up the /tops/ of your skis change with their sidecut?



Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post

It doesn't affect anything. It really is the ski running true on the snow that keeps it from running in toward the other ski, in my experience. based on using all my skis and not cutting the pants, (I have never had the skis running on each other enough to cause top sheet damage, except some slight abrasion along the tip. must be some old habits, really old, kick in at some times in chop and crud, where I find a closed stance useful if it's particularly cruddy. 
 



Agree....too many years with a close stance rooted deep in the brain and muscle memory. Especially since I still switch between old school boards and more modern shapes.

 

Doesn't seem to be sidecut related...

 

 

post #27 of 29
Thread Starter 

a close or closed stance is a good stance for really bad crud, wet, heavy, set up, because, for me anyhow, I can ski the skis like one unit and the crud can not apply the forces to snag at one or the other ski. One day was particularly rough out and I saw a good friend of mine who guides in Alaska (his cred) and he was doing the same thing. It's another tool one pulls out of the tool box when needed. I think it's neither old school nor progressive, it's just a classic technique.

 

A ski that is less than 95mm wide skis soooo poooorly when the edges are trashed, I am always puzzled at the blase' attitude toward keeping them nice. When my last pair of Legend Pro's  were brand new, they made a buzzing sound when turning at decent speed, sort of a whir, hum, buzz kinda. I do love that sound. it goes away as soon as you are skiing a serrated edge. I have another brand new pair, looking forward to the buzz. buzzed skiing, haha.

post #28 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpfreaq View Post

I'll skip an otherwise tasty line if it looks like I'll end up doing a few rock turns.  Once committed, though, ya just gotta make those rocks your bitch.



Amen!!

post #29 of 29

I'm more interested in keeping ME undamaged.  Usually that means my skis are safe as well...  

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