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anti fog Ski goggles

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

 

Edited by world-traveller123 - 12/3/11 at 11:08am
post #2 of 17

I have never owned a pair of double lens goggles that have fogged.  Smith, Scott, Zeal, Oakley, Bolle and Dragon all make  good goggles.

post #3 of 17

Any lens can fog.

 

That's the short answer.  Including doublets, treated, etc.  But the chance of a single lens fogging is generally greater than a double lens system.  Older anti-fog treatments and lens qualities generally left quite a bit to be desired in anti-fog performance.  Manufacturers have generally improved techniques, durability, effectiveness and longevity of anti-fog goggle lenses.  Make sure you don't take goggles off after a run and place them on your forehead, or allow them to sit inner-lens up in any form of precipitation.  Those are almost certain to allow fogging conditions to propagate.  Further, remember that moving air will help to minimize the propensity of fogged lenses, so be sure you look for goggles with good venting and keep those vents clear of snow, baclavas, hats, non-vented helmets etc either above or below.  How old are your goggles and what mfr are they?  You may wish to consult the retailer you purchased them from if less than a year ago, and see if you may have a defective lens treatment.  It's rare, but it certainly can happen.

 

Best

 

Brian~

post #4 of 17

Buy some cat crap. Put on 6 layers.

post #5 of 17

Haber vision makes a device called the "eliminator." It is a small fan that fits inside the goggle and has a sensor that comes on automatically when moisture is detected. Works like a charm.

 

http://www.habervision.com/

post #6 of 17

1) get any pair of new goggles if yours are old.  If fogging really is a problem, go for OTG lenses ( for glasses wearers) that will have extra volume.

 

2) Per the instructions don't touch the inside of the lens unless they are dry. the built in coating of a lens is like a gel so will not "fog" up easily (eventually droplets will appear after the gel is saturated).  The more you mess with it the worse you are making it.   If you already wiped up the original gel coating, you should think about getting a replacement lens or new pair of goggles instead of trying to recoat.. 

 

Better to bring a second pair of dry goggles then attempt to clear out wet goggles (if you fell). 

 

3) If you are fogging because of overexertion, change up your clothes to  get more ventilation.  Are you dressed appropriately for the weather so you don't steam up?  Unzip the top of your jacket or arm/pant zips when you're hot to let out your core heat and so steam doesn't chimney directly up your  face,  take off your hat.  


Edited by raytseng - 11/22/11 at 7:02pm
post #7 of 17

Scott makes some goggles with anti-fogging fans. I believe that they also market a "no fog" fan kit that you can retrofit to Scott goggles.

Oakley also has goggles with anti fog fans installed in their military line ("Standard Issue"), but these are not widely available.

post #8 of 17

Not to start a helmet vs no-helmet war, but do you ski with a helmet? More particularly a helmet w/ a vented brim (if any). My goggles used to fog up all the time when I was wearing just a beanie. Since I started using my Smith Variant Brim helmet, I have not really had any instance of fogging that I can recall, no matter which goggles I decide to wear that day, and no matter what the conditions are. The only exception would be when I'm on a slow moving lift on a windless day. They can still fog up then, but the moment I'm off the lift and get moving again, they clear up almost instantaneously.

 

So my deduction is that good ventilation at the top of the goggle is probably more effective than any special goggle, gunk, or gizmo. Just my observation.

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

 


Edited by world-traveller123 - 12/3/11 at 11:08am
post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephen1254 View Post

Haber vision makes a device called the "eliminator." It is a small fan that fits inside the goggle and has a sensor that comes on automatically when moisture is detected. Works like a charm.

 

http://www.habervision.com/



Hey, that's pretty clever!  I wonder if it leaves enough room for eyeglasses?  I suppose it depends on the size of the glasses and goggles.

post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinFromSA View Post

Not to start a helmet vs no-helmet war, but do you ski with a helmet? More particularly a helmet w/ a vented brim (if any). My goggles used to fog up all the time when I was wearing just a beanie. Since I started using my Smith Variant Brim helmet, I have not really had any instance of fogging that I can recall, no matter which goggles I decide to wear that day, and no matter what the conditions are. The only exception would be when I'm on a slow moving lift on a windless day. They can still fog up then, but the moment I'm off the lift and get moving again, they clear up almost instantaneously.

 

So my deduction is that good ventilation at the top of the goggle is probably more effective than any special goggle, gunk, or gizmo. Just my observation.


If the snow is falling it can pack up the vents on top of goggles, so a helmet brim helps deflect the snow away from the vents.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 

 

 

Edited by world-traveller123 - 12/3/11 at 11:08am
post #13 of 17
Quote:

Originally Posted by world-traveller123 View Post

 

. As in guarantee nothing fogs up at all. during a ski in any weather?


 

They are definitely /not/ junk.  

 

   "Guarantee nothing fogs up at all" is too high a standard.     You can certainly arrange things so that your fogging source (redirected breath, eyebrow sweat, damp hair caught under the foam &c.) greatly exceeds the capacity of the fan (it is only a tiny little fan after all).

 

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by world-traveller123 View Post

Just a questions about those goggles with the anti fog fans, the Eliminator

 

like the Smith Turbo goggles etc.

 

Do they actually work well. As in guarantee nothing fogs up at all. during a ski in any weather? that is if the vents are open?

 

or would they just be over priced junk?

 

your thoughts as i would like to buy some. thanks


I had a pair of Smith Turbo Fan goggles and they seemed like they were high-quality, however they did not work out for me because the frame simply did not contour to my facial structure. Without regard to how they fit me (because fit is very personal), the only issue I saw was that the on/off switch was very tiny and in order to operate the switch I would have to remove my gloves. This was many years ago, so I don't know if they have altered the design for current models.

 

post #15 of 17

Have you seen these new goggs www.elk-sport.com  -  they have a heated lens and fans  - look good too

 

My buddy says that they are great but i haven't tried them personally yet.

post #16 of 17

Looks like an interesting concept.  I'd be very interested to learn more about the specifics of their mechanism.  Looks like everything is still very much pre-production and they're looking for investors?  They also mention some form of integrated face mask and also helmet integration, but their site shows no helmet option.  It looks like they're jumping on the Zeiss lens bandwagon as well.  There are more and more goggle manufacturers turning to Zeiss for their lenses - which on the one hand means a decent lens should be easily sourced for various manufacturers.  On the other hand, it means that fine tuning of materials, design, and particular optical properties may be highly limited or at the least subject to Zeiss availability.  It will also add to the cost - the Zeiss name is a lot like Oakley now - you pay a lot more for it.

 

GDogg, are you planning on getting a set yourself?  Let us know your first hand experience if you do get set-up with your own pair.  I'd love to know a lot more about their tint options, ease of changing lenses etc.  Perhaps if they're at the Outdoor Retailers show this weekend I can check them out and report back.

 

Cheers!

 

Brian~

post #17 of 17

Hi Brian,

 

Yeah the fog issue really seems to affect me, not sure why!  I have tried everything, even got a new helmet with visor, which was rubbish.

 

I'm an engineer so the science seems to make sense to me i.e. heat to keep surface of lens above dew point (meaning that the vapour wont condense on the surface) and fans to exhaust the high humidity air.

 

I've put my name down but not sure when they will be available! Hopefully soon as fog really affects me.

 

Cheers,

G

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