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Why the trees were cut down

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

At base area Bar One patio there were several large trees, around 4' diameter, 140' tall. These trees stood a short distance from the Funatel cable and the KT bullwheel and cable. Lift safety is compromised if a falling tree can destroy the lift. so that's the why of it.

post #2 of 20
Thread Starter 

one bump, it was a question a month ago, and everyone assumed it was simple insensitivity to the environment to expand the bar. I thought so and now know better. you're in a gondola, you say: this is scary, but what could go wrong, cables don't just break. well, a 100,00 pound tree falling on a cable could sure ruin your day, and trees fall unexpectedly.  this information from a source close to the cables in question.

post #3 of 20

no excuse.

 

post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 

I hate the way it looks now, and feel for the loss of tree life, but care to elaborate?  what are the options? I believe it is a law or a regulation pertaining to lift construction. I do prefer the feeling of being in a gondola and knowing that NOTHING can knock me out of the sky (except an Airforce jet perhaps)

post #5 of 20

No excuse? That's what a lot of folks would be saying if the trees fell and people got killed. I can hear the lawyer's closing remarks: "That was an easily foreseeable accident, AM had no excuse for not attending to safety and now these kids have no parents."

post #6 of 20

Actually, I am a tree hugger.  I never saw the tree or the safety hazard so how would I know.  I just don't like old trees being cut down.

 

 

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by chilehed View Post

No excuse? That's what a lot of folks would be saying if the trees fell and people got killed. I can hear the lawyer's closing remarks...


That's what happened when the trees were removed from the East Coast glades.

 

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

what's what happened?

 

the Tahoe basin was clear cut by the Nevada mining industry. I'll never forgive them for that, and now they have a tv ad campaign stating for PR that they are environmentally friendly. sure.

 

you can't hug a tree tighter than I, but I distinguish between native species and junk species planted, and natural forest density and reforest density.

 

Also, that risk is huge and un-acceptable for Squaw, not just legal liability, but the loss of life.

 

I am most struck by my thoughts through the years; yeah, I'm way up here, but I'm safe. NOT!!!!!

post #9 of 20
A tree was blown off its roots during a Tahoe storm last winter. Landed mighty sudden on to a lift line cable bouncing a few people out of a chair. Fortunately no serious injuries. I imagine tree assessments were made throughout the off season & action taken where appropriate at most Tahoe resorts. Prolly done yearly sop.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 

the trees in question have been slipping through inspection for 50 years thensmile.gif, just like the rest of us dirtbags.

 

I was thinking that the new ownership is a little more cautious and by the book than the Cushing's.

Those were really beautiful pine trees, Jeffry's or Ponderosa's or a hybrid thereof. but consider this. they are close to the facilities, not 6 feet from the patio. some water pipe starts leaking without anyone knowing, the earth under the patio becomes saturated, still nobody knows, the tree is in a foundation of slurry, wind picks up and the tree tips over. could EASILY happen..  sad but necessary loss. maybe plant a few Japanese Maples to mitigate the sting.

 

post #11 of 20

We had a 75' tree fall during the wind on Friday, 100' from the house. Better safe than sorry.

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 

scary. glad you're OK.

 

I had a tree that had had the driveway laid around it in about 1970  die suddenly last year, about 120 footer.  the few months it stood there dead right next to my house, I was super nervous every time the wind blew hard.

 

I'm actually impressed with that type of thinking (trees fall, gondolas meet misfortune), now that it has been explained to me. It's a form of thinking outside the box.

 

It does end a classic funny situation that always happened in line. big clumps of snow would fall out of the tree right onto someone in line, totally without warning, and subjecting the victim to a cold wet surprise down their neck and the hoots of the other people in line.

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post some water pipe starts leaking without anyone knowing, the earth under the patio becomes saturated, still nobody knows, the tree is in a foundation of slurry, wind picks up and the tree tips over. could EASILY happen..  sad but necessary loss. maybe plant a few Japanese Maples to mitigate the sting.

 


Could get hit by a bolt of lightning!

 

post #14 of 20
Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post
 

you can't hug a tree tighter than I...

 

I had a tree that had had the driveway laid around it in about 1970  die suddenly last year, about 120 footer. 



You're clearly hugging too hard eek.gif

 

I was up in the village and knew things looked different. I sort of wrote it off to the other changes they're making (rings missing, new board, ticket windows gone). Now I realize those trees are missing too.

post #15 of 20

I thought the same thing.  I assume you're referring to the incident at Sierra at Tahoe.  Lucky it was a powder day and the people who were ejected had relatively soft landings.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by 911over View Post

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A tree was blown off its roots during a Tahoe storm last winter. Landed mighty sudden on to a lift line cable bouncing a few people out of a chair. Fortunately no serious injuries. I imagine tree assessments were made throughout the off season & action taken where appropriate at most Tahoe resorts. Prolly done yearly sop.


 

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

that's very possible, especially in the mountains, especially if someone ignores safety protocol. but not in a Gondola which I believe is grounded (anyone know?), and I think it's policy to close down the entire resort in an electrical storm, we did it last year I recall. I'm not a worrier by nature, I simply prefer as few variables as possible when I'm dangling 200' off the snow.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post


Could get hit by a bolt of lightning!

 



 

post #17 of 20

We were at Mt Snow when a chair got struck.  One of the towers actually had a fire while people were on the lift.  No one was hurt.

post #18 of 20
JayT, you are correct. Highly windy day brought some extreme gusts & the tree snapped. Not a root job, a trunk snap. Davluri lightening storm = shut down. It is not unusual for lightening ground strikes to be in direct proximity of buried power lines. There is often a kinship greeting going on. Paul that would have been freaky to watch. Metal towers?
post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

 what are the options?


Portable sawmill,  logging truck.

 

 

I really wonder about how some people never quite plan for what happens when a tree /needs/ to be removed.       

post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by 911over View Post
 Paul that would have been freaky to watch. Metal towers?


I guess that the towers were metal.  The electrical stuff was on fire.  It was a serious fire.

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