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The Official "The East Coast skiing sucks" thread - Page 4

post #91 of 166

The "summit" of Alyeska is at 3939' and it is in bounds, hike to.

 

Elevation is certainly not everything, but it can mean the difference in snowfall and quality. Yes, even though it is lower than Stowe, it gets way more snow. Unfortunately the low elevation means Alyeska gets rain in December despite being way up north, and they need to rely on snowmaking at the lower elevations. I Like the mountain a lot, but it would not be my top pick due to the variable conditions. Nor would Stowe.

 

 

post #92 of 166
Thread Starter 



 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


 


Um, isn't the Alyeska summit within the resort boundaries and heli served?  What are the options to get to the top of Mansfield?

 

I think the elevation and air density is an important factor when planning a ski trip.  Higher is always better until you get up over 12K

 

And this is from their website..

 

 

 

 



Do not what your trying to say/ I just point otut that your logic was flawed, and you say what are your options.

 

You can hike to the top of both, never have know of place that has heli serviced inbounds.

 

Naybreak I am sure you can hike to top of tons of ski resort with tennis shoes.

post #93 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldEasternSkier View Post

Having fun doesn't suck.

 

Skiing is fun.

 

Work sucks.  

 

Not working doesn't suck.

 

Skiing is not work.

 

There is skiing on the East Coast, which is both fun and not work.

 

Therefore, East Coast skiing does not suck!



I like the way you think!  Reminds me an old saying adapted to skiing.  A bad day of skiing is still better than a good day at the office.

 

Rick G

 

post #94 of 166


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



Do not what your trying to say/ I just point otut that your logic was flawed, and you say what are your options.


What I am trying to say is that it appears there is a difference between the top elevation of "Stowe Mountain Resort" and the top elevation of Mt Mansfield.  The top elevation of "Alyeska Resort" is higher than the top elevation of "Stowe Mountain Resort"

 

 

Quote:
Vertical 2360 ft - (658 m)
Top elevation 3719 ft - (1133 m)
Base elevation 1559 ft - (475 m)
Skiable area 485 acres (1.96 km2)

 

 

 

Quote:
Vertical 2,500 ft (760 m) lift serviced;
3,200 ft (980 m) total
Top elevation 3,939 ft (1,201 m)
Base elevation 250 ft (76 m)
Skiable area 1,400 acres (5.7 km2)

 

Good for you that you can duck the back fence and hike farther up to 4300.  Like I said, I prefer thinner air with my mountain experience. 

 

Cheersbeercheer.gif

 

Honestly, these days I prefer to ride to the top.  A traverse over to less traveled terrain is still OK, but I'd rather pay to ski at a place where the lifts to all the way up.  Why haven't either of these places put towers to the top yet?

post #95 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post


 


What I am trying to say is that it appears there is a difference between the top elevation of "Stowe Mountain Resort" and the top elevation of Mt Mansfield.  The top elevation of "Alyeska Resort" is higher than the top elevation of "Stowe Mountain Resort"

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good for you that you can duck the back fence and hike farther up to 4300.  Like I said, I prefer thinner air with my mountain experience. 

 

Cheersbeercheer.gif

 

Honestly, these days I prefer to ride to the top.  A traverse over to less traveled terrain is still OK, but I'd rather pay to ski at a place where the lifts to all the way up.  Why haven't either of these places put towers to the top yet?




the lifts do not go to the top of Alyeska.

post #96 of 166

 

 

Naybreak I am sure you can hike to top of tons of ski resort with tennis shoes.


You can. Although Mansfield from the road access could be done walking backwards drunk.

 

The whole thing is a false argument.  I love Vermont.  It is one of the top 2 or 3 states I would live in for the long term.  But that is live in for a whole number of reasons.

 

If my daily life was combination of mountain biking and skiing, Vermont wouldn't be top 10.  The entire state can be fit several times over into the public lands of many Western states.  When you stand on a point in the West and see the curvature of the earth, and virtually everything you are seeing is public land, your scale is on such a different level as to make words ineffective in describing the difference.  

 

As to whether you feel that difference as what defines somebody who truly lives in the West vs. somebody who lives in the East is up to you.  I grew up in Virginia.  I came home when I moved to Colorado.  Debating the quality of skiing is not that relevant.  The quality of life is.

 

As I write, the Stowe website 'still hopes to open on Nov 23rd' with 2" of manmade snow and 0" of natural snow.  That can only be anything but a joke except as competition with Western high altitude resorts.  Which is simply the reality.  Colorado alone has something like 23,000 inbound skiable acres, and that has nothing to do with resort adjacent or pass accessible terrain if you care about that stuff.

 

Many people prefer smaller and more intimate environments.  Pitching them in dick swinging contests is a silly proposition.  Because that is a "it's not the size of the wave, it's the motion of the ocean argument".  Certainly true, but some arguments are best left zipped up when you expect pictures to tell the story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #97 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




the lifts do not go to the top of Alyeska.



 

Dude, you really need to work on your reading.. 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Honestly, these days I prefer to ride to the top.  A traverse over to less traveled terrain is still OK, but I'd rather pay to ski at a place where the lifts to all the way up.  Why haven't either of these places put towers to the top yet?


 

 

post #98 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post




the lifts do not go to the top of Alyeska.



Right, he's not disputing that... he's saying that the highest IN-BOUNDS elevation at Alyeska is higher than the highest IN-BOUNDS elevation at Stowe.  That's kind of central when thinking about "Ski resorts."  Geologically speaking, based on your argument, the "highest point" at any resort, east or west, would be Denali.

post #99 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post



 

Dude, you really need to work on your reading.. 
 


 

 



Yeah, I wasn't gonna call BS on his SAT verbal, but..........

post #100 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



Right, he's not disputing that... he's saying that the highest IN-BOUNDS elevation at Alyeska is higher than the highest IN-BOUNDS elevation at Stowe.  That's kind of central when thinking about "Ski resorts."  Geologically speaking, based on your argument, the "highest point" at any resort, east or west, would be Denali.



it has to be inbounds for safety. Inbounds also means it can be closed. Top of stowe can not be closed.

post #101 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post



it has to be inbounds for safety. Inbounds also means it can be closed. Top of stowe can not be closed.



I've been to Stowe, and have seen The Chin with my own eyes... I've seen dozens and dozens of pictures... to most individuals, that is no place to be skiing... it is a bad idea, an injury waiting to happen, and a ruined vacation.

 

With that line of reasoning.... Denali can't be closed either, and you can access it on foot from Stowe, Spring Mountain, Taos, and Alyeska... it is, after all, the parent peak to all aforementioned hills....

post #102 of 166

Never skied Stowe or Alyeska... But I know which I would like to ski more... 

 

I think the fact that people are butt hurt enough to need to make these threads to make them selves feel better is pretty funny.

 

Also, Alyeska has a history of hosting of many freeskiing comps. Which resorts in the east are international venues for freeskiing?

 

 

post #103 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



I've been to Stowe, and have seen The Chin with my own eyes... I've seen dozens and dozens of pictures... to most individuals, that is no place to be skiing... it is a bad idea, an injury waiting to happen, and a ruined vacation.

 

With that line of reasoning.... Denali can't be closed either, and you can access it on foot from Stowe, Spring Mountain, Taos, and Alyeska... it is, after all, the parent peak to all aforementioned hills....



which is a good thing. Its keep the rift raft out, and you can not see a single skiable line from the top of Gondi and most of the skiable lines do not look that way from the bottom. there is one skiable line that people ski only because it leads to the longest glade in vermont. The top of it is literally a slide for life zone. If it wasnt Id imagine we would see more tracks coming off the top.

 

I am certain the top of Alyeska has to be gnarly than the chin.

 

 

post #104 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Never skied Stowe or Alyeska... But I know which I would like to ski more... 

 

I think the fact that people are butt hurt enough to need to make these threads to make them selves feel better is pretty funny.

 

Also, Alyeska has a history of hosting of many freeskiing comps. Which resorts in the east are international venues for freeskiing?

 

 

 

 

its called entertainment Tim.
 

 

post #105 of 166

BW, I've seen AK walls in TGR movies I'd rather ski compared to The Chin.

 

 

It's the mixup of low snowpack, cliffs, rocks, trees, bushes, boulders, and madness....

post #106 of 166
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

BW, I've seen AK walls in TGR movies I'd rather ski compared to The Chin.

 

 

It's the mixup of low snowpack, cliffs, rocks, trees, bushes, boulders, and madness....



I guess it is.

 

stowe20090325_07a.jpg

post #107 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

which is a good thing. Its keep the rift raft out

 

 


Which rift were you planning to raft?  I can't imagine rafting any of the rifts on Mansfield. If you put rafts in those rifts, you'll get all sorts of riffraff out there.

 

smile.gif

 

Josh, I know engrish ain't language your first but you shud at least try to lern some of it.

 

And for god's sake, get a little more creative in the threads you start my boy!

 

 

 

post #108 of 166

I like skiing.

Skiing is fun.

I like skiing the East.

I like skiing the West.

I ski in snow.

I ski in wind.

I ski in rain.

I ski because it's fun.

Who f***in' cares really.

 

Love where you ski because it's your mountain. Go out every time you hit that mountain and kill it. I've skied deep powder in the East and crust in the West and loved both. East coast skiing doesn't suck it's just different. I love it.

If you wouldn't ski the East your basically not a true skier. This is not because your not tough enough to ski the East; but because you don't have unconditional love of the sport. A skier will ski whenever he gets the chance, even if it's only a local hill in Ohio with a vert of 400', once a month, at night. That's an effin' skier.

post #109 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post


Given how often you post things with nothing to back it up, that's a wee bit funny.

 

I'm still opening this thread looking for the awesome EC pics, though.

 



There are lots of awesome EC pics for people to browse on the web if they're truly ignorant and don't realize what the EC has to offer terrain-wise. 

 

Arguing about things like elevation is silly, though.  The east is what it is, and high-altitude it's not.  It also doesn't have more terrain than the west.  NH in particular is arguably a better training ground for Chamonix than anywhere else in the U.S., because of the nature of the snow and ice and terrain, but one other great thing about that training ground is that it's accessible.

 

I always get reminded of the CA versus EC surfing thing.  The EC actually has on average better waves, produces many good contest surfers, can be less crowded for an average experience, but can't compete with the wave experience when CA is good-middling to best. 

 

post #110 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post



There are lots of awesome EC pics for people to browse on the web if they're truly ignorant and don't realize what the EC has to offer terrain-wise. 

 

Arguing about things like elevation is silly, though.  The east is what it is, and high-altitude it's not.  It also doesn't have more terrain than the west.  NH in particular is arguably a better training ground for Chamonix than anywhere else in the U.S., because of the nature of the snow and ice and terrain, but one other great thing about that training ground is that it's accessible.

 

I always get reminded of the CA versus EC surfing thing.  The EC actually has on average better waves, produces many good contest surfers, can be less crowded for an average experience, but can't compete with the wave experience when CA is good-middling to best. 

 


I was not being sarcastic about the pics. love seeing them and hoped this thread would be more about cool EC lines than east-west arguments.

 

post #111 of 166

It's been said before..  the only thing that really sucks is NOT skiing.  Skiing anywhere/everywhere doesn't suck at all.


Edited by crgildart - 11/22/11 at 9:49am
post #112 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

It's been said before..  the only thing that really sucks is NOT skiing.  Skiing anywhere/everywhere with doesn't suck at all.


Yep. Reminds me of what my dad said about beer: "There's no bad beer. Some's better than others."

 

post #113 of 166

Skiing is better than beer.

 

post #114 of 166

I'll think about that this Sunday while I'm training new instructors in the rain on the beginner terrain.

post #115 of 166

post #116 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by iWill View Post

I'll think about that this Sunday while I'm training new instructors in the rain on the beginner terrain.



My first few days as an official instructor knowing I wouldn't have to pay for skiing all season were definitely better than beer, even if they had been in the rain.  Think back to yours and you'll likely agreebeercheer.gif

post #117 of 166

I have skied the Chin at Stowe a bunch of times.  It is really fun.  Goat and the other Front Four are fun as well.  There is an even skinnier "trail" off to the skiers left of Goat, forget exactly how to get there, but it is pretty good.

 

Also have skied Alyeska.  Good mountain, in late March you couldn't really tell it was so close to sea level conditions wise.  The real goods in AK were a bit further up the road in Turnagin Pass. No lift though.

 

Ski at Mammoth mostly now.  I think it can't be beat.  But thats just me.

 

Started skiing at Mt Baldy,CA. some last year.  Only about 45 mins. from Newport Beach Ca.  Absolutely sick on the right days.

 

Any ski hill can be great on a given day or it can suck.  Mostly what you make of it.

 

Thats me and my buddy hiking a bit higher in AK

DSC00455.JPG

Me

DSC00459.JPG

 

Baldy Storm

Baldy Pic.jpg

 

 

Fun line at Mammoth last March

Mammoth March.jpg

 

"Secret" spot at Mammoth

The Tail.jpg

 

Don't have any pics anymore of the East, but grew up there and worked there (Stowe and Okemo) for awhile.  Lots of fun days there whether pow or ice!

 

post #118 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post

Maybe people prefer higher, drier snow, not having to ski between deciduous trees, seeing for miles and miles, sunshine, powder, the most beautiful mountains anywhere, couloirs, cliffs, the wild wild west, etc.

 

The west has so much to offer that the east doesn't.  That doesn't mean east coast skiing sucks, but it means western skiing is better.


I don't know that I'd call the American West's mountains the "most beautiful" anywhere. Beautiful, certainly, but I'd say the Alps, Himalayas and others might have a sentence or two in that conversation.

 

I've never understood the animosity toward EC skiing myself. It's got its own character with plenty going for it. It's silly to spend time knocking one thing to elevate another. In that vein, European skiing is vastly superior to the American west for vertical and history; Japanese skiing beats just about every American West resort for powder; Antarctican skiing dominates the American West for exotic scenery. Etc.

 

Who cares. Skiing is skiing and each destination has its own flavor.

 

ETA: Actually the whole argument is a giant fallacy anyway. There really is no "western" skiing or benefits thereof. Each geographic area, and in many cases specific resort, is not similar enough to others to define any sort of "western skiing" experience.

 

Just look at those factors you name. Utah is overcast and dreary all winter--so much for the sunshine--but packs the best snow anywhere.Colorado offers its cliche 300 days of sunshine, but lacks the snowfall of most other western ski regions. Mountain ranges, both within a single state and across the west, vary drastically in terms of look and features.

 

The east is a little more homogenous due to its smaller area and lower mountains, but there is still much difference between resorts and regions.

 

 


Edited by JoeUT - 11/22/11 at 6:30pm
post #119 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post


I don't know that I'd call the American West's mountains the "most beautiful" anywhere. Beautiful, certainly, but I'd say the Alps, Himalayas and others might have a sentence or two in that conversation.

 

I've never understood the animosity toward EC skiing myself. It's got its own character with plenty going for it. It's silly to spend time knocking one thing to elevate another. In that vein, European skiing is vastly superior to the American west for vertical and history; Japanese skiing beats just about every American West resort for powder; Antarctican skiing dominates the American West for exotic scenery. Etc.

 

Who cares. Skiing is skiing and each destination has its own flavor.

 

 


Well, that's right, of course, but it's more fun to fight than take a Zen position.  

 

(I'll take that Om, though, since where I live is known to suck, and I'm not moving anytime soon.)

 

post #120 of 166

Is East Coast skiing better than West Coast beer?

 

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