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Re-ironing Wax

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Anyone have any experience or thoughts about re-ironing wax to save time and saturate ski bases? I do not have access to a hot box, but would like to be able to saturate my bases. I hear that hot boxing skis is equivalent to 20 - 30 hot wax cycles. I have seen the threads about building a hot box. I may eventually try that, but would like to try something easier first. I am not a fanatic (I think, but if I actually build a hot box this opinion may change) about waxing, I will be doing some racing (I have a lot more to improve with technique than wax), but I do prefer to keep my skis well tuned. 

 

My skis have all been ground, had the edges set and been waxed with base prep. Normally I would brush - wax - scrape - brush - brush - brush a few times before the start of ski season and several more times throughout the season. This year I am thinking about trying something different. I can easily handle the hot waxing, but would love to minimize or avoid the brushing and scraping. If the bases are clean, I add a little new wax each time and I allow them to cool between each cycle is there any benefit or anything wrong with this approach? Also if this is OK any thoughts on a wax choice?

 

post #2 of 8

ya it would be similar to hotboxing - -i agree. no need to brush and scrap in between a waste of time.

 

post #3 of 8

Among others, check out this thread: Base prep and waxing

post #4 of 8

One benefit over hotboxing is your binding grease would not be compromised.

post #5 of 8

The viability of this approach, I think, depends upon your objectives. If you are just trying to saturate the bases, it is better than a single waxing. However, I expect it would be worse than a progression of waxes. As I understand it, if you do a progression of waxes based on temperature you saturate the bases better than with any one wax:  as you are using different temperatures the base material behaves differently and you get more wax saturated; also the different waxes have different composition so you are more likely to fill more micro voids in the base with particles that are right sized. If you wanted to avoid the brushing I would think you could just reheat the wax in each layer slightly and do a light hot scrape.

If you are trying to make the bases faster, your approach won't do much. The repetitive brushing breaks down the hard edges on a new grind, making the skis faster. But not everyone cares if their skis are 1% faster and it is a lot of work for results that really only matter if you race and if your times are within 1% of the winner's.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

So it sounds like this could work. I had planned to wax and hot scrape first, then apply a heavy coat of a soft hydrocarbon wax. The progression of waxes makes sense as does the hot scrape between layers. For now I am really just looking to get more wax into the bases. During the season I will do plenty of brushing and eventually choose wax based on the conditions I expect to ski.

post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwbrookside View Post

So it sounds like this could work. I had planned to wax and hot scrape first, then apply a heavy coat of a soft hydrocarbon wax. The progression of waxes makes sense as does the hot scrape between layers. For now I am really just looking to get more wax into the bases. During the season I will do plenty of brushing and eventually choose wax based on the conditions I expect to ski.


It's fine and a more efficient use of your time. You might do this again between the first couple/few outings of the season and later as a 'refresher'. I used the new Briko-Maplus 40.60 (40% soft, 60% med) Racing Base with excellent initial results. We'll see how long it lasts.

 

post #8 of 8

Passing along another recommendation that was given to me by a former WC tech - include some moly waxes in your progression. There are lots of advantages to molys for both racing and non-racing. I had 2 sets of my skis done over the summer with hot box cycles of moly waxes. I am on the east coast and haven't tried them yet but I am looking forward to seeing if the extra money was worth it.

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