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Are my custom footbeds too wide?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I have attached a photo of my custom footbeds, which are VERY wide due to massive arch-flaps.  This makes them more voluminous than the stock footbeds.  The stock footbeds also are softer, and these are rigid, despite being approximately same thickness.

 

Anyway, for a 98mm race boot, are these too big?  These drive my instep up into the boot and cut off circulation.  After putting boots on, I can feel venous pressure THUMPS within seconds.  This last time, no lactic acid burn ensued, but it was still wicked.

 

I put a dotted yellow line where the stock footbeds would go.

 

Options are: 

 

1.  Keep footbeds as is, go through a bunch of punches. (free)

 

2.  Buy new footbeds that are not that wide. (135 dollars)

 

photo (34).JPG

post #2 of 25

Why not option:

 

3. Go back to whoever made them and have them fixed?

post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by incognito View Post

Why not option:

 

3. Go back to whoever made them and have them fixed?



That would require a plane ticket to Denver, a rental car, and a drive to Winter Park.

 

 

But, otherwise, I'd do that.

post #4 of 25

Or c) trim footbeds with tin shears. Or d) get a thinner boot board. Hard to tell from pic, but don't arch supports come up toward viewer? So when they sit in boot, they are not actually taking up that much width in the horizontal of board. Sounds like if they put your feet into proper orientation, your navicular region presses the upper. So I'd suggest taking them back to the fitter and telling him/her your dilemma. Actually, first take this post to Ask the Boot Guys Forum. They're the boot experts. We're just owners. 

post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Or c) trim footbeds with tin shears. Or d) get a thinner boot board. Hard to tell from pic, but don't arch supports come up toward viewer? So when they sit in boot, they are not actually taking up that much width in the horizontal of board. Sounds like if they put your feet into proper orientation, your navicular region presses the upper. So I'd suggest taking them back to the fitter and telling him/her your dilemma. Actually, first take this post to Ask the Boot Guys Forum. They're the boot experts. We're just owners. 



My iPhone camera isn't that great... but it's actually quite a huge fan-like flap that adds volume to the area under the arch, driving the anatomy of the foot straight up into the shell.

 

Plus, for some reason, this also causes my big toenail to be driven up into the top of the toebox (and that area has already been punched as much as it'll go, plus it has this stupid rubber plug there that can't be dealt with)

post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 

Here are a couple more views...

 

photo (36).JPG

 

photo (37).JPG

post #7 of 25

Any bootfitter should be able to adjust them for you for a nominal charge, otherwise you could attempt a DIY surgery.  I'd probably use an Xacto knife and go in small increments - a couple of mm at a time.

 

post #8 of 25

Dude, you're whole boot situation seems like a literal shit show.

post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by incognito View Post

Any bootfitter should be able to adjust them for you for a nominal charge, otherwise you could attempt a DIY surgery.  I'd probably use an Xacto knife and go in small increments - a couple of mm at a time.

 



Maybe.... at the shop in Winter Park where I got these, the guy had an electric zapper knife like surgeons use to cut through tissue.  This is thick rigid plastic, so maybe I'd need one of those mini saws that are used to cut through fiberglass casts.

post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vitamin Ski View Post



Maybe.... at the shop in Winter Park where I got these, the guy had an electric zapper knife like surgeons use to cut through tissue.  This is thick rigid plastic, so maybe I'd need one of those mini saws that are used to cut through fiberglass casts.



Or probably just a dremel.

post #11 of 25

This may be a dumb question, but have you actually skied in them yet?

 

If not, do that first.  You might be surprised.  I had the same thing with some new foot beds, and was really concerned, as in the shop they just felt all kinds of wrong.  But it was the first time I went from a cork Super Feet to a Comformable and I trusted the guy who did it.  So I gave it a try.  I was really surprised how different (and awesome) it felt skiing.  It all kinda came together.

post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

This may be a dumb question, but have you actually skied in them yet?

 

If not, do that first.  You might be surprised.  I had the same thing with some new foot beds, and was really concerned, as in the shop they just felt all kinds of wrong.  But it was the first time I went from a cork Super Feet to a Comformable and I trusted the guy who did it.  So I gave it a try.  I was really surprised how different (and awesome) it felt skiing.  It all kinda came together.



I did ski in them last season for 3 days.  They skied great, amazing even.  However, my shell was no where near where it needed to be, and some combination of physical factors also drives my left big toenail up into the top of the boot when skiing, if the custom footbeds are in.  Not sure how I'm going to address that.

 

I hope the liners have a bit more "packing out" to do... they've been skied about 6 full days.

post #13 of 25

I would definatley wait then, dont do anythig you cant reverse until you are sure.  Unless you got a WC race liner they will pack a bit more.  Toe being driven up and forward is possibly a tecnhique issue (sitting back) can be a cause.  If you can bear it, just ski them a few more days and see how you go particuliary if you notice they appear to be getting better as the number of days go by.

post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

I would definatley wait then, dont do anythig you cant reverse until you are sure.  Unless you got a WC race liner they will pack a bit more.  Toe being driven up and forward is possibly a tecnhique issue (sitting back) can be a cause.  If you can bear it, just ski them a few more days and see how you go particuliary if you notice they appear to be getting better as the number of days go by.

 

Ok, I suppose I will try skiing in them (although the left boot will probably need some more shell work before I ski in it again).  As far as the toe, I can feel it sitting at my desk with the boot unweighted, and ironically it actually went away while skiing.

 

I don't know if these are "WC liners."  I have the Raptor 125 RS (98mm), and I vaguely remember reading somewhere that the liner was the same as is put in the 135 RD, which is essentially a WC boot.  The liner says "performance pro" on it.  I hope for my own packing that it is not a "WC" liner.  It is quite thin, and has a leather outer.
 

 

post #15 of 25

I have the 130 RS shell with custom footbeds and the ZipFit World Cup liner.  I'm thinking that the ZipFit would help without modifying the footbed, but then of course you have to come up with the money for the new liners.  They're been available on eBay quite often early this season at great prices so if you're game then check them out.  IMO they're far superior to the stock Head liners (especially the 125 RS).

 

BTW - the basic footbed check is to place it in the shell without the liner.  There should be at least a 3-5mm gap between the outside edges of the footbed and the shell all around.  If not, when you use the footbed in the shell it will be deformed by the squeezing.  If your footbed does not currently pass this test then a liner swap isn't going to help much.

 

If it were my situation I would just re-heat the footbed and slap it in the liner and buckle up.  I'm somewhat familiar with the outfit that provided those footbeds and I'm fairly sure they can be re-heated (at least a few times).  That footbed is not posted, so it's "accomodative" rather than "functional".  IOW, you're just looking for comfort and some good performance - you're not trying to fix a leg alignment issue with those footbeds.

post #16 of 25

Go to a master fit boot fitter.

post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

Dude, you're whole boot situation seems like a literal shit show.


not that anyone is paying any attention out here........

 

you have made multiple posts in open forums and in ask the bootfitters forum. in each post you are getting some good advice as well as a s**t ton of the absurd.

 

we have seen photos of your feet, your boots, your footbeds, and you described your hopelessly broken bootboard. all showing that you have  gone to the wrong boot fitter(s) and on your own cannot tell the difference between s**t and shinola when it comes to your feet and boots. not one of the things you are burning up the internet with is an unsolvable problem for a boot fitter that is one step smarter than a two by four.

 

first of all it is your foot and lower leg that determine what you need to buy or fix. you are approaching your situation in a single dimension. like this is what i have, how come it does not work. i am going to go out on limb here, and guess that the way you got the head boots, le ski lab footbeds, the bad punches and the broken boot board, was by posting online questions like "what is the best boot for my foot?", or "i have a ridiculous amount of money to piss away on a less than average boot fitter and i am interested in some really poor fitting footbeds that are not properly interfaced to my ill fitting boots, where should i go?"

 

i might be able to help you by explaining that 1. your boots, your footbed, your punches, your boot board can all be fixed to perfection by a good boot fitter. 2. you would never have to be wasting any of your time on this if you went to a good fitter/shop in the first place.

 

good luck, this is my best, last post to you,

 

jim

 

post #18 of 25

^^^^ There's the problem.  It's hard to tell if a boot fitter is good or not, unless you are a good one yourself.

post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post


not that anyone is paying any attention out here........

 

you have made multiple posts in open forums and in ask the bootfitters forum. in each post you are getting some good advice as well as a s**t ton of the absurd.

 

we have seen photos of your feet, your boots, your footbeds, and you described your hopelessly broken bootboard. all showing that you have  gone to the wrong boot fitter(s) and on your own cannot tell the difference between s**t and shinola when it comes to your feet and boots. not one of the things you are burning up the internet with is an unsolvable problem for a boot fitter that is one step smarter than a two by four.

 

first of all it is your foot and lower leg that determine what you need to buy or fix. you are approaching your situation in a single dimension. like this is what i have, how come it does not work. i am going to go out on limb here, and guess that the way you got the head boots, le ski lab footbeds, the bad punches and the broken boot board, was by posting online questions like "what is the best boot for my foot?", or "i have a ridiculous amount of money to piss away on a less than average boot fitter and i am interested in some really poor fitting footbeds that are not properly interfaced to my ill fitting boots, where should i go?"

 

i might be able to help you by explaining that 1. your boots, your footbed, your punches, your boot board can all be fixed to perfection by a good boot fitter. 2. you would never have to be wasting any of your time on this if you went to a good fitter/shop in the first place.

 

good luck, this is my best, last post to you,

 

jim

 



Now I resent this... if I had "money to piss away" I would have both had new boots now, and have made the trip to a good bootfitter.


Edited by Vitamin Ski - 11/19/11 at 10:43am
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by starthaus View Post

 

 

good luck, this is my best, last post to you,

 

jim

 



Can you cut and paste post it to the other threads for the benefit of others who may perchance think this is normal?

post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post



Can you cut and paste post it to the other threads for the benefit of others who may perchance think this is normal?



thumbs_down.png

 

not cool

post #22 of 25

Dude, you started like five threads about your boots, all reflecting the same problem (you don't have a good bootfitter), plus, you don't seem to have even skied them this season. It's one thing to ask for advice, quite another to keep coming back with questions second guessing what appears to be an incompetent bootfitter. That's not cool. At least you could do others a favor by mentioning who this bootfitter is so others can avoid him.

 

After reading the forum for 7+ years, believe me, others have had much more difficult bootfitting sagas and have managed to confine it to one, perhaps two, threads.

post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aschick View Post

Dude, you started like five threads about your boots, all reflecting the same problem (you don't have a good bootfitter), plus, you don't seem to have even skied them this season. It's one thing to ask for advice, quite another to keep coming back with questions second guessing what appears to be an incompetent bootfitter. That's not cool. At least you could do others a favor by mentioning who this bootfitter is so others can avoid him.

 

After reading the forum for 7+ years, believe me, others have had much more difficult bootfitting sagas and have managed to confine it to one, perhaps two, threads.



I had different specific questions regarding the boots I wanted answered, hence multiple threads.  

 

Secondly, I placed most of these in the "Ski Gear Discussion" so as not to clog the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum.

 

There are a couple of individuals/bootfitters that have been very helpful to me, answering specific questions (which is the only thing I really wanted out of the threads).

 

 

I'm not about to tarnish somebody's reputation by mentioning the shop/person.  The person is very nice, and tries very hard.  And it is not his fault my feet are wide.  That is not to say by any means I am satisfied with my service.  But we're getting there, punch by punch (or maybe not on the left big toe... I'm afraid the boots need a blowtorch to fix that).

 

It's a moot point anyway; nobody reading this site (especially not any of the 100 daily users) goes to this shop.

post #24 of 25

I have not read the other 4 or 5 threads, but what I find amazing is that in this thread you state you are in 98mm Race Boots then later you state that you have wide feet and you wonder why your feet are cramped...

 

Finally, you state that the bootfitter is in Winter Park and NOBODY reading this site goes there!!! If that is the case, that means they are very new or very bad!!!

 

Spacecase

post #25 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spacecase View Post

I have not read the other 4 or 5 threads, but what I find amazing is that in this thread you state you are in 98mm Race Boots then later you state that you have wide feet and you wonder why your feet are cramped...

 

Finally, you state that the bootfitter is in Winter Park and NOBODY reading this site goes there!!! If that is the case, that means they are very new or very bad!!!

 

Spacecase


No no no.

 

I don't "wonder" why my feet are cramped.

 

The bootfitter in Winter Park made my footbeds... frustrating punches took place at different ski shop.

 

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