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How good a skier is good enough for ski patrol? - Page 4

post #91 of 113

What Mountain?  Something in NC?  Often the terrain dictates the level of Patrol Skiing skill (or at least sets the minimum ability requirement).  I've visited other Patrols and have been both dismayed by the lack of skiing skills on some, but also floored by the very high level of skiing on Others (The MRG Patrol is as hardy and skilled as they come!).

post #92 of 113

It was NC this time.  I've seen mediocre skiing patrols at many resorts elsewhere too (as well as off the charts killing it skills).  It's a combination of skills and talents required.  Huge triage skill and knowledge will make up for skiing ability when there is a gap that needs filling on the staff there.  You can teach a doctor to ski easier than you can teach a skier to diagnose internal injuries.

 

Full disclosure, this was an exception.  Most of the patrols I see around here are excellent skiers.icon14.gif

post #93 of 113

Skied out West yesterday, and saw some patrol (could have been volunteer vs. pro) and the level of ski and toboggan was terrible. The tail rope was close enough for the patient to touch him, directly behind the sled, and holding the rope completely wrong.

 

They were training, thank god, but on an actual injury scene we saw a very poor set up. No skis crossed uphill, no patrol directing traffic, it was just sad. But i have also heard that the patrols out here are private as compared to being under NSP.

post #94 of 113

Skism

 

"under NSP" does not exist.

 

Each ski area maintains their own rescue services.  NSP provides uniform training (materials)

 

Setting crossed skis is cute,  and sometimes needed. Sometimes it is even possible. (Tried present conditions lately?)  Up hill traffic management is a good thing.  At a real scene,  I like to ask for help from ANY SKIER until help arrives.  Hard to ask that during training.

 

tail rope?  Not all areas endorse their use.  Tisk tisk on the trainees!   Personnaly,  I feel tail ropes are a waste of effort. ( some situations demand a belay!  even a moving one ;-)

 

 

Any time,  any trail...

 

have fun out there!

 

post #95 of 113

clap clap!  mr grandy!   fine post

post #96 of 113

to be certified "under nsp" you have to pass their specific test using the right protocol... private patrols don't have this and hence can do things differently. Besides that fact, if you are training then train right. bottom line. if it is a real scene and you dont want to be "cute" then sure leave the skis alone. Oh yea... and 75% of patrolling is public image so not looking like a bunch of gapers while treating a patient is probable a good thing.

 

tail ropes? yea only necessary when the toboggan driver slips or loses control with a patient... no big deal.

post #97 of 113

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skiism View Post

 

tail ropes? yea only necessary when the toboggan driver slips or loses control with a patient... no big deal.

 

Or when steep and/or narrow, and/or going sidehill, especially when steep/narrow and/or moguled.  

 

 

 

post #98 of 113

Or when you hit a dead flat-- the tailroper can be the "tailgunner", and ski ahead and give you a sling.

post #99 of 113

Older thread here about tail roping, perhaps to avoid further thread-jacking:

http://www.epicski.com/t/68201/tail-rope

post #100 of 113

Alveolus.......my boyfriend pulled up this thread after I worked a long weekend in Adult ICU.....I laughed so hard....oh my I've worked with a critical care doc who's was an engineer first he's excellent to work with. Look at this way "airway" comes first so at least when the patient is sliding off the side of a cliff he/she will have a patent airway!! Hopefully the patrol who are excellent skiiers can ski and you can save the patient's life...a win-win! Jill aka Golani

post #101 of 113

Alveolus (I like your user name) - I, like you, am an MD (anesthesiologist) coming to the point in my life where my children a grown, and I'm trending towards part-time, or taking long stretches of time off.  A few years ago my wife and I were in Colorado for a week and were looking at real estate for a second/vacation home at which we might spend a month or two in the winter and summer.  I mentioned to my wife the idea of patrolling, which she thought was terrific.  Like you I'm comfortable with airway management (duh), resuscitation, line placement, chest tubes (I did a year of general surgery), etc.  I went and talked to one of the patrol directors and he told me that they have more than a few MDs who volunteer for the patrol, most of whom, he made it very clear, were younger than me (ouch). 

 

I did ask how strong a skier you need to be.  I'm probably a little stronger skier than a level six (maybe a seven or eight) which he felt was adequate.  After all, you only need to be able to ski to the scene, the younger guys (his words) can drive the sled down the mountain.  Makes sense.

post #102 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ldrjax View Post

Alveolus (I like your user name) - .

I liked it too.....until my wife asked "Doesn't that mean 'windbag'?"
post #103 of 113
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ldrjax View Post

Alveolus (I like your user name) - .

I liked it too.....until my wife asked "Doesn't that mean 'windbag'?"
post #104 of 113
Skier A, 5'2", great finesse skier and ski patrolled eastern Canada. Moved west and wanted to do big mountain patrolling.. failed on two occasions.

Skier B, 6'2", not a great skier.... same testing conditions as skier A. Passed on second season for big mountain patrol.

Why did skier B pass and not A, because skier B can control 300lbs of equipment on the tobogan in the steepest terrain. Skier B also had longer skis with a greater length of ski edge. It helps to be physically strong...

Skier B, after two seasons with the patrol, became a decent skier with free lessons and practice.
post #105 of 113

Calling BS on the size thing.

 

We have YAPs (i.e. Young Adult Patrollers) that could not weigh 125 # soaking wet and stand less than 5 foot 2" that can handle a loaded sled on any terrain that "larger" members of patrol can also handle.

 

"It's not the size of the dog in the fight,  but it is the size of the fight in the dog!  "

 

Training technique and TEMPERMENT means a lot when it comes to being part of a mountain rescue group.

post #106 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
Training technique and TEMPERMENT means a lot when it comes to being part of a mountain rescue group.

 

x2. Technique will get a toboggan to where it needs to go every-time. If your are relying on brute force or strength you need work on your sled handling skills.

post #107 of 113
The girl that took me down the other day probably weighed half of what I do. About 5'2"?
post #108 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The girl that took me down the other day probably weighed half of what I do. About 5'2"?


??? Are you OK?

post #109 of 113

I've seen plenty of ski patrollers that would not make the list of "good skiers", but they all ski well enough to safely bring a patient down any marked run on any hill they are going to patrol. 

post #110 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The girl that took me down the other day probably weighed half of what I do. About 5'2"?


??? Are you OK?

Yes. Had a couple bad days, but was out yesterday. It's raining now, so waiting until Thursday.

Shit happens.
post #111 of 113
Just wanted to chime in and say thanks-- it's been an interesting read so far.
post #112 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The girl that took me down the other day probably weighed half of what I do. About 5'2"?


Doing OK now?

post #113 of 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

The girl that took me down the other day probably weighed half of what I do. About 5'2"?


Doing OK now?

I'm fine, still sore, but skiing again.
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