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Pulled the Trigger on a BCA Float 36

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I just pulled the trigger on a float 36. I have been thinking about doing this for a while now... I ski backcountry a lot by myself due to where I live and the lack of motivated people around.

 

Anyone have any opinions or use one of these?

 

Thanks!

 

post #2 of 12


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skilease View Post

I just pulled the trigger on a float 36. I have been thinking about doing this for a while now... I ski backcountry a lot by myself due to where I live and the lack of motivated people around.

 

Anyone have any opinions or use one of these?

 

Thanks!

 


You asked for any opinions.  Mine is that it's a bad idea to ski alone in the backcountry.  I think having a competent buddy with you is at least as useful as your equipment.  The Float 36 does look good, though...

 

post #3 of 12

If you do ski alone, keep it mellow.  I had to dig a buddy out 48 hours after he went missing.  His hand was above the surface and he had an ice block around his head. He was probably alive about an hour after the slide.    I don't ever want to do that again!

I also knew a guy that broke his leg and froze to death.  Just be careful!

 

 

I like BCA, I like Bruce and I think the Float looks pretty good.  I already committed to get another brand or I'd be getting one.

post #4 of 12

I agree with Shredhead. If you're going to go it alone, I'd stick to mellow terrain where there's little to no chance of an avalanche.

 

I can't understand why, with all we know about avalanche safety, people insist on going it alone. I understand where the BCA can help, but what if you break an arm or leg and/or become partially buried? The BCA helps in one aspect (getting fully buried) but you're still extremely vulnerable if you're out there by yourself. Frankly, given how expensive BCAs are, I'd consider just finding a regular touring partner (moving somewhere where touring is more popular?) because that will increase your safety much more. Throw on the BCA in addition to that, if cost isn't a concern.

 

 

post #5 of 12

I ski bc alone sometimes, and have been Involved in endless discussions about it online.  I strongly suggest that a separate thread can be started in the appropriate forum about it, since that wasn't really the OP's question.  

 

I don't have an airbag yet, but it's pretty much my next big purchase so I clearly think they can be a valuable tool.  That said, I don't think they are bullet-proof armor. I can see big issues even with an airbag if you're getting strained through trees.  The bags have evolved quite a bit lately, and yes, they are expensive.  But when I worked in a shop I used to tell people that if they needed something and it worked for them in the bc, they wouldn't care how much it cost - seems like a good way to look at airbags.  

 

Most of the stuff I've seen as far as testing them seems to indicate that they are very effective when worn and deployed properly.  So, my opinion: good on ya OP.  

post #6 of 12

"I ski bc alone sometimes, and have been Involved in endless discussions about it online.  I strongly suggest that a separate thread can be started in the appropriate forum about it, since that wasn't really the OP's question. "

 

Kinda hard to separate the two.

post #7 of 12

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

"I ski bc alone sometimes, and have been Involved in endless discussions about it online.  I strongly suggest that a separate thread can be started in the appropriate forum about it, since that wasn't really the OP's question. "

 

Kinda hard to separate the two.

 

Try.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

 

Try.



Nah, I stand by my original post. Also OP asked for opinions, so maybe step down a notch. 

 

A Float on a solo mission in the backcountry is comparably useful to a life raft on a solo trip across the Atlantic with no radio. It may save you from drowning, and you may get lucky, but there's still a good chance that you're f*ed. If this was a conversation about which beacon to buy for a solo mission, it wouldn't be a conversation at all. Given the price of the Float and its limited ability to assist, I don't see it as very useful.

 

Maybe if you use the airbag in conjunction with a personal locator beacon, so at least you could contact someone if you were alive but unable to get out, it makes sense. But by itself, not that much.

 

Again, my opinion (and response to the OPs request for opinions).

post #9 of 12

^That's what I love about this place.  

 

If you're done now...

post #10 of 12

Rad.

post #11 of 12

Here's to hoping you never actually have to "pull the trigger" on it.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks all for the concerned responses :) 

 

I am looking at any way to minimize having issues in the BC... that is why I learn about snow conditions continually, dig pits, etc... and when possible, ride with a buddy.

 

I pulled the trigger on the Float cause it's one more tool to help me come home after an epic session. 

 

If you guys want to chat about the dangers of Solo BC, do it up! I'd love to hear more. 

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