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Am I making a mistake?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi,

Based on glowing  reviews I bought Rossi Experience 88. I would say I am lower intermediate. I ski mostly blue runs sometimes black when conditions are good in Poconos and upstate NY. I can't demo skis unfortunately, like many here suggest. That would be ideal. I am wondering if this is not too much of a ski for me, it is recommended for intermediate to advanced skiers. I am still learning how to carve, I make skidding/sliding turns most of the time. I am thinking about exchanging it for Experience 76 but then I am afraid I will "outgrow" it. I wanna keep this skis for many years since I ski only on weekends. From your experience guys, you think it is better to buy skis recommended for your ski level or buy more expensive, better quality ski and sort of grow into it? You think E88 is too burly and I am just gonna struggle and not enjoy it? All of you who had the same dilemma when they started being serious about skiing, your input would be appreciated . Thank you

post #2 of 12

The Experience 88 is a really good ski, but it's probably wider than you need if you are skiing on-piste in the Poconos. Is it going to be too much? Hard sayin', probably not but it might make getting better at skiing harder for you. A narrower ski might be a better investment at this point for you.

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thank you for you advice. I am considering Rossi E76 or Atomic Smoke not Ti. Which would be a better choice?

post #4 of 12

Having not skied the Experience 88 I cannot comment on it, but generally a 88mm wide ski is fine for groomed hardpack snow,  When I bought my 92mm wide Armada ARV's 3 years ago I was amazed how well they skied on hardpack snow, even better then my old carving skis, and I weigh only 148 lbs.  You should not have any problem with that ski. Plus it will be much better when you try off piste runs.

post #5 of 12

I think both skis you mention, the rossi 76  and the 88 would be fun skis on the groomers,  its more a matter of deciding if you want a bit wider ski for maybe venturing off the groomers.

 

If your immediate focuss is mastering carving and sticking to the groomers maybe you will get more out of the 76.   The 76 still has all mountain capabilities.  A friend of mine rides the Rossi 76 model before the experience and loves it.  Takes it everywhere!

 

Richo

 

 

post #6 of 12

You stated that you have purchased, can you return them? What length did you buy? Based on the Philpug review below and various posts by users, I think you could use the 88 in a shorter length. Phil indicates he likes Rossi 88 as a turning ski and not a high speed cruiser, which is a little unusual. Like most above, my first recommendation would be the 78, but, there really is not that much of difference between 78 and 88. On occasion, I ski an 88 in the Pocono regions, but not as my daily driver as I just like a quicker turning ski on a shorter hill.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/102331/review-2012-rossignol-experience-88

post #7 of 12

Too much ski?  No, not at all.  IMHO you should get an expert ski that will also accommodate an intermediate skier, ie.e not a race-stock ski, but not a ski marketed to beginners or intermediate skiers.

 

Too wide?  Yes, you would be way better off learning to make turns with a narrower ski.  Exchange it for the 76 or the Atomic Smoke TI.

 

All these folks who say the wider ski is fine on groomers because they have no problem doing it are not giving you the full story.  I can and have smoked a Porsche 911 on a twisty road (the kind with lots of corners marked 30 mph) with a stock,except for the Michelin Pilot tires, Chevy Caprice station-wagon.  That doesn't mean a Porsche 911 wouldn't be better suited for making good time on that road.

post #8 of 12

Don't know anything about the 88 specifically, but agree with Ghost and Whiteroom- if you are learning to carve it is going to be easier to get the feel for it on a narrower ski that is designed for that purpose.  Sure guys can carve a wider skier, but they have typically mastered carving on a narrower ski first.  Of course, others might say that if you get decent at carving a 88, then carving on a narrower ski will be really easy

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Too much ski?  No, not at all.  IMHO you should get an expert ski that will also accommodate an intermediate skier, ie.e not a race-stock ski, but not a ski marketed to beginners or intermediate skiers.

 

Too wide?  Yes, you would be way better off learning to make turns with a narrower ski.  Exchange it for the 76 or the Atomic Smoke TI.

 

All these folks who say the wider ski is fine on groomers because they have no problem doing it are not giving you the full story.  I can and have smoked a Porsche 911 on a twisty road (the kind with lots of corners marked 30 mph) with a stock,except for the Michelin Pilot tires, Chevy Caprice station-wagon.  That doesn't mean a Porsche 911 wouldn't be better suited for making good time on that road.

 

True.  If you are still learning to get the skis up on edge so you can feel that smooth carve, then the 88 is the wrong ski for you.  Where you are skiing, I suspect you will be mostly on groomed man-made, thawed and refrozen snow with some natural mixed in.  This stuff is hard, as you know.  You'll want to focus your growing skills on learning to carve the ski, and learning to feather the amount of edging you use at different points of the turn so you can control the shape of your turns with agility and power.  A ski that is 88m wide underfoot is more difficult to get up on edge; get one with a narrow waist.  78 will be fine.  So will narrower, by the way.  Buy an advanced level ski that is torsionally stiff, so it will hold on the ice whoops I meant the hardpack.   
 

 

post #10 of 12

^^^^ What he and Whiteroom said. Yes, an 88 can be fine on groomers. Even super fun if you have some space to work. But it'll make learning to carve harder. OTOH, something in the 70's is most folks' day to day in the east, with fatties for soft snow. When you come to a site made up of hard cores, many live for soft snow, think 88 is narrow. Not really, if you just go out and look at what people (and instructors) ski on an average day. I'd vote for the 76, and in a couple of years when you're fully addicted, get some 108 somethings for powder and trees. Or if you only want one ski and discover in two years you want to live in the glades, then a high 90's is about perfect...

post #11 of 12

The Exp 78 might be slightly better long term if you are going to hold onto it for a while. Has 2mm extra width everywhere so should turn similiar to the 76 does but has more camber and less rocker than the 76 so might feel better traditionally carving wise once you get your turns sorted. Has dual tech construction vs cap too so maybe a bit more edge stiffness which you will appreciate in the future too.

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your responses. I still can exchange the E88. And based on what most of you are saying I decided on E78 which unlike E76 has some sidewall under foot . Like LiquidFeet said I ski mostly on groomed man-made, thawed and refrozen snow on narrow Pocono's trails and I think narrower ski is a better option after all. Thank you again. And thank god they have such generous return policy:)

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