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Has the goal of powder skiing changed?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I keep on reading here how people want fatter and fatter skis so they can 'float' on the powder. I just don't get this. I love to be deep in it, the deeper the better, the easier for face shots. Have things changed?

post #2 of 13

I think there have been a few discussions about this...I think you float more in some conditions, but not all.  I understand what you are saying about wanting to be in the snow, but others like the floaty-surfy feeling.  Sometimes a narrower ski will bottom out and find the hard snow (or rocks) underneath while a wider ski might stay more in the softer stuff.

 

In short, things have changed, but everyone is free to do what they want.

post #3 of 13

I thought we have always just wanted to have fun....   wink.gif

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

I thought we have always just wanted to have fun....   wink.gif



Exactly. The goal is to have fun. The reason for the variety of equipment is that people have fun in different ways. Some like to sit deep in the snow, while others like to surf through it.

 

Different strokes for different folks.

post #5 of 13

Love that post,  everybodies free to do what they want.   Great isnt it!

 

 

I think also the fatter ski's come into their element where pitch isnt at avalanche levels, the average skier is still able get out there and ski the powder where as with tradional narrow skis maintaining enough speed on lower gradient slopes not as easy.

 

Richo

post #6 of 13

the goal is to have fun, with the lightest snow your still not going to float to the top on fat ski.

 

68194_477363723356_505253356_5612982_6142995_n.jpg

 

if the snow is good you will still be in it, if its crappy youll be on it.

 

post #7 of 13


Huh, great pic,  looks like yr having fun.  But I cant see you smiling, must be all that powder in the way!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post

the goal is to have fun, with the lightest snow your still not going to float to the top on fat ski.

 

68194_477363723356_505253356_5612982_6142995_n.jpg

 

if the snow is good you will still be in it, if its crappy youll be on it.

 



 

post #8 of 13

If we got to ski bottomless powder all the time skis probably wouldn't have changed as radically as they have. The magic of modern powder skis is that they can create a bottomless-floating feel in 8" of snow over a re-frozen crap base.

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

If we got to ski bottomless powder all the time skis probably wouldn't have changed as radically as they have. The magic of modern powder skis is that they can create a bottomless-floating feel in 8" of snow over a re-frozen crap base.


So spot on. Last season right after Juneuary we had about 3 to 4 inches of dust on hardpack. I got the "I like to ski in the powder" line from a guy. Funny that skiing "in" the powder that day was just skiing hardpack. The whole day to me felt pretty bottomless.

 

 

 

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

If we got to ski bottomless powder all the time skis probably wouldn't have changed as radically as they have. The magic of modern powder skis is that they can create a bottomless-floating feel in 8" of snow over a re-frozen crap base.



To expand on this, the planing surface area of many wide-er skis these days isn't much different than what you'd find if you calculated the surface area on tired GS skis from back in the day. 

 

The total planing surface area is also far from the most important thing in determining how a ski reacts in powder.  And, as noted, modern "fat" skis don't float in good fresh snow -- because of the way snow is, even reverse/reverse skis and snowboards get immersed before they plane up.  Snow is different from liquid water, unless you live in some parts of the east coast.

 

You are less likely to tib/fib in rotten mank and otherwise are more likely to enjoy yourself on modern skis.  You do still get face shots.

 

 

 

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richo View Post


Huh, great pic,  looks like yr having fun.  But I cant see you smiling, must be all that powder in the way!
 



 



oh no I was smiling. 5 seconds later

 

68231_477544633356_505253356_5616182_6808985_n.jpg

 

East Coast as well, all the EC haterz can xxxx my xxxxs.

 

The thing is there is no real downside for alot of us to ski a 100 mm ski everyday. Hardly fat by today's standard but the edge grip really isnt much worse than than narrower non race skis with rocker they are easy to swing around in tight places, and they make powder skiing easier and less variable. 

 

Fatter skis come out for more snow and or days when we need to make 6 inches of dust on crust feel like powder.

 

Again let me say it again that the myth you can actually float on powder is just that.

 

My avatar was taking on 192cm 120mm wide skis I am clearly still in the snow

 

 

10870_181469403356_505253356_2776316_5856471_n.jpg

 

post #12 of 13

/ End Thread.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post


if the snow is good you will still be in it, if its crappy youll be on it.

 



 

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 

Intersting, I like the thought a10-15cm snowfall on hardpack can feel nice instead of scraping through. Now I begin to see at least one use for otherwise unnessasarily wide skis.

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