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Lifetime Warranty on Ski Bindings ? Isn't it time? - Page 3

post #61 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

 

 

The OP referenced Diving Regulators as a model and yearly service intervals. What would you feel is an acceptable fee to have a binding dis-assembled, re-greased and cleaned and re-calibrated? I'm asking. Would this be a 'give away the razor to sell the blades' situation?

 

If I was given a free binding, I would be happy to pay $80-$100 for this service with every 30 hours' use.    Provided they also run ultrasonic crack checks on the casing.

post #62 of 67
Thread Starter 

"What are these guys thinking?"

 

"How ridiculous to suggest and offer such a thing".

 

"This is really stupid"

 

"What's a binding for?"

 

"I don't get it.(Or anything else for that matter.)"

 

"Who gets the warranty? Where? How?When?Grand kids?Mammals? Reptiles? Marsupials?Crustacean?"

 

"Could I get a pair for free and still belong to the United States Association of Ignorant Cat Herders?"

 

http://www.unionbindingcompany.com/technology/lifetime-warranty   rolleyes.gif

 

The best question. Why would you bother to try to make something better when few would appreciate your efforts?

post #63 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by skimalibu View Post

"What are these guys thinking?"

 

"How ridiculous to suggest and offer such a thing".

 

"This is really stupid"

 

"What's a binding for?"

 

"I don't get it.(Or anything else for that matter.)"

 

"Who gets the warranty? Where? How?When?Grand kids?Mammals? Reptiles? Marsupials?Crustacean?"

 

"Could I get a pair for free and still belong to the United States Association of Ignorant Cat Herders?"

 

http://www.unionbindingcompany.com/technology/lifetime-warranty   rolleyes.gif

 

The best question. Why would you bother to try to make something better when few would appreciate your efforts?

Only people who are going to buy a quality binding, cost around 400 probably, are very well educated about it all;  "make it better" may be the torpedo that sinks your business in that scenario. last a lifetime means no revenue from replacement due to wear or shifts in fashion. (Quality has been the guiding star of my business, right into oblivion.)

 

I can picture the Look PX or Pivot (for example) with steel tracks and screw retainers (titanium prob just too costly), an aluminum alloy body, titanium alloy wherever it can be used based on cost (nowhere?), like toe wings and heel retainer clamps.

 

but, ain't gonna' happen, we (Americans) are so invested in price point comparison between apples and oranges.
 

 

post #64 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

Only people who are going to buy a quality binding, cost around 400 probably, are very well educated about it all;  "make it better" may be the torpedo that sinks your business in that scenario. last a lifetime means no revenue from replacement due to wear or shifts in fashion. (Quality has been the guiding star of my business, right into oblivion.)

 

I can picture the Look PX or Pivot (for example) with steel tracks and screw retainers (titanium prob just too costly), an aluminum alloy body, titanium alloy wherever it can be used based on cost (nowhere?), like toe wings and heel retainer clamps.

 

but, ain't gonna' happen, we (Americans) are so invested in price point comparison between apples and oranges.
 

 

   I think you would be surprised who would want such a binding if it fell in that 3-5 hundred window. There isn't one available. So it's all pie in the sky now with no concrete answers. I've alluded to some potential buyers in my previous posts in this thread. Union Binding feels there is a market and room in the snowboard world for such a life binding. I think they're right.

   Hopefully someone in the right position, in a company takes action in a leap of faith in a attempt to try to justify their place in payroll for the period or year. And they take action with one model in their line up. Funny to remain optimistic on this in such a bad time in human history. Everywhere you look today someone is being rewarded for doing something wrong. Some days I swear, I see every example of poor human behavior available right before my eyes.

   A friend of mine once said in an interview."Writing of any kind a leap of faith. In that what is true for you, is true for someone else."  I think that holds up for many things in life. And why I work towards making this a reality.

 

   If you have the right binding design, it's durability in testing will show you if it should receive any consideration as a life binding. (Not all designs should be considered or will.)  After that point you will see if you need to go any further along with development of that design. There is obviously no reason to guarantee anything if you need to worry about it's durability long term. If you manufacture to a strict spec your losses/failures should be few on a strong design. The less parts in your design the better all the way around. The less to be manufactured, stocked and again fail. The old "Keep it simple stupid."

  

   Titanium is a very strange and deceiving material. I have been down the road quite a few times with it. Interesting looking stuff. Machines in an unpredictable fashion. You've got to have your speed just right. Otherwise the bit tears at the material. It isn't always the miracle replacement that you think it is going to be in the end. I've found that increasing the thickness or Gage thickness of your present or original material sometimes is the better fix. Heat treat or plating the surface that is being stressed sometimes is the other good fix. Titanium doesn't play well with other materials. It is light, strong and hungry.

 

   If you develop cracks in something machined. You need to determine. Was it machined to thin in a critical area of load? Or did you choose the wrong alloy for the seen load? Where one part devours the other and then yields. Also something sacrificial and as simple as a Teflon washer can be a permanent fix in the galling between two parts. And still other times. You just have a poor design that needs to be reworked to move the load to another more robust location of your design.

  So far I've learned quite a bit. The more I think about this, the more I realize what qualities such a binding should incorporate. In the end I'll write it all up and dump it in a few places.

 

  Maybe I'll rework a few different models/designs suggested above that were sold to a more robust structural spec.

 

  The only thing I want is to buy a few pairs for my own skis.

 

  If someone can't see why.

  Let them use the current bindings and pay the usual money wasting homage to the indemnification list.

 

  And to answer my own "best question". Because there are a few that do have a want and an appreciation for something better.

 

post #65 of 67

If you are familiar with cycling products, Chris King took the Campy headset (and Phil Wood took the hub) that was the standard and improved it quite a bit, and I think he is an engineering background type innovator.

 

the difficulty getting it done may be one of two. either people won't spend the necessary amount or the business can't survive off the size clientele they attract at first. I think the second issue is more of a problem.

post #66 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

If you are familiar with cycling products, Chris King took the Campy headset (and Phil Wood took the hub) that was the standard and improved it quite a bit, and I think he is an engineering background type innovator.

 

the difficulty getting it done may be one of two. either people won't spend the necessary amount or the business can't survive off the size clientele they attract at first. I think the second issue is more of a problem.


  I know many of those type of people, but not them. A company that is in the ski binding business would be the best target. That way you don't need to translate so much. It could be a rebirth for them. We have seen a few of them in ski recently. The approach is important. Some people have the "No, Not invented here mentality" no matter what they are offered or shown. Timing is also important. That is why I'm not set on one particular design. It's the concept of and then let's improve the best design you guys have in your box. Take it three steps beyond what they have currently and have ever thought of going. That way the pride they have (if any) can help push them over to my side. If they aren't behind their products. Their blood sucking bottom dwellers anyway. And a waste of everyone's time.

 

  With the way the BC and Extreme thing is being dangled, hyped and pushed currently. Maybe this has a slight chance to squeak by.

 

  You know as well as I do. There is room for a more robust binding.The "Lifetime" is so that the binding gets all the (T)s crossed and the ( I )s dotted.

 


  Dave, I don't know how ANYBODY is surviving in business right now. That is, if you aren't involved in something perceived as a need. These fools (on both sides) have got things so screwed up.

 

post #67 of 67
Thread Starter 

Hum Smith must not know the facts either..................... Good, well written warranty.

 

 

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