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Lifetime Warranty on Ski Bindings ? Isn't it time? - Page 2

post #31 of 67

Let's say I know some people who know some people who could make this happen... what's it worth to you? Put a dollar figure on the initial cost and the yearly service. What would you spend for this relief from anxiety?

 

 

post #32 of 67

A Lifetime warranty on bindings is #348 on the list of things to fix the ski industry.

 

What do you want the the warranty to be against? Abuse, Misuse, Remounts, Performance, Release, Retention, Graphics, Remounts? Who's lifetime? the binding, the user, the original user, their children, their children's children? How are you going to track this? Original receipt, proof of purchase, registering the product with the manufacture? What are the costs involved to administer this process are you willing to pay 2-3X times more than we are pay now for bindings for this?  


Edited by Philpug - 11/13/11 at 7:24am
post #33 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View PostLet's say I know some people who know some people who could make this happen... what's it worth to you? Put a dollar figure on the initial cost and the yearly service. What would you spend for this relief from anxiety?

 



We already do, in a way. Look brought back the "Pivot" after many skiers demanded a proper binding back on the market. But they are sure making us pay for the honor. The tooling for these bindings, which have been produced for more than a decade, is long since paid for. The premium price and somewhat limited availability (that is getting better now) is a reflection of the fact that skiers who know what they want, will indeed pay (way more than covers fair margin) for a first quality binding. There is also a perception that cost reflects quality or performance, which may or may not always be the case. Their not selling consumers alternate brake width "lowers" is also a negitive in my view.

 

Like many other things these days "make it cheap and sell it for all the market will bear" is a sign of the times.

I like the Pivot alot, but not @ $300+ dollars times the number of skis I buy. I can find PX14/15 Racing bindings for around $100..... biggrin.gif . Plus they need to bring back the FKS 155 version as I prefer the one piece metal toe with the lower DIN scale. Make it with 80, 100 and 120 brakes and do it for $250 retail and I'll buy a small boat load.... wink.gif

 

post #34 of 67

so you will pay $100 less than the current retail price for a binding with a 5 year warranty for a similar binding with the addition of a lifetime guarantee/warranty?

 

I'm not sure that is going to shift the industry paradigm.

post #35 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
I like the Pivot alot, but not @ $300+ dollars times the number of skis I buy. I can find PX14/15 Racing bindings for around $100..... biggrin.gif .


$20 worth of stainless steel threaded inserts per ski pair or plates could be a game changer in this thinking. You'd only need to purchase one pair of bindings, if you were willing to spend 5 minutes swapping bindings between skis:

 

STH4_400.jpg

 

Of course, you also have the choice to not purchase and maintain a boat load of skis. wink.gif

post #36 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


$20 worth of stainless steel threaded inserts per ski pair or plates could be a game changer in this thinking. You'd only need to purchase one pair of bindings, if you were willing to spend 5 minutes swapping bindings between skis:

 

STH4_400.jpg

 

Of course, you also have the choice to not purchase and maintain a boat load of skis. wink.gif



Terry, from this picture i can't tell if the inserts stand proud or flush.

You sell two types(brands), what are the differences?

 

post #37 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post


$20 worth of stainless steel threaded inserts per ski pair or plates could be a game changer in this thinking. You'd only need to purchase one pair of bindings, if you were willing to spend 5 minutes swapping bindings between skis:

 

STH4_400.jpg

 

Of course, you also have the choice to not purchase and maintain a boat load of skis. wink.gif



But I LOVE having a boat load of skis WITH bindings, no swapping for me....

 

(but I think the inserts are great for repairs!)

 

post #38 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Postso you will pay $100 less than the current retail price for a binding with a 5 year warranty for a similar binding with the addition of a lifetime guarantee/warranty?

 

I'm not sure that is going to shift the industry paradigm.



It's not a warranty issue for me. I simply want a quality product at a fair price. If it's built properly of the right materials it will work for a long time.

 

post #39 of 67

Thread drift:

Binding Freedom and Quiver Killers are the two players so far. The owner of Binding Freedom is a mechanical engineer and was instrumental in the design of the Quiver Killers. They are for all intents and purposes the same in dimension and 5mm sized ss machine screws. Mounted flush or below flush. Proud is undesirable.

 

On topic:

The concept of these, IMO, is long over due and would give the consumer the choice to purchase more or less bindings, shared between multiple skis OR use AT or alpine or tele bindings on the same skis. A shop could offer this mount option to it's customers and the DIYer would have the choice to take on the risk to add inserts to their boards or not and use their favorite bindings. Give me gear I don't have to toss or unload every other year and I'd be willing to pay more for one solid, long term binding solution.

 

K2 used to make tele skis with inserts. Snowboards do. Aside from herding cats and other profit motivations, why not ski manufacturers or integrate a universal binding mount system?

 

Edit: the growing AT market suggests that a segment of the skiing market is willing to pay a premium for bindings and provided incentive for the fast growing insert market.


Edited by Alpinord - 11/13/11 at 9:06am
post #40 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Synchro View Post

 I also had a pair of the defective Atomix Xentrics, which they replaced. .

Because I purchased my Atomic skis/bindings in Europe (Germany), Atomic USA refused to replace mine...even though this was a known defect.  My German had grown so rusty, I didn't bother to try to deal with Atomic in Austria.

 

 

post #41 of 67
Thread Starter 


  OMG!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

A Lifetime warranty on bindings is #348 on the list of things to fix the ski industry.

 

What do you want the the warranty to be against? Abuse, Misuse, Remounts, Performance, Release, Retention, Graphics, Remounts? Who's lifetime? the binding, the user, the original user, their children, their children's children? How are you going to track this? Original receipt, proof of purchase, registering the product with the manufacture? What are the costs involved to administer this process are you willing to pay 2-3X times more than we are pay now for bindings for this?  



  HA! #348? I thought it was higher on" the ski industry insiders double whammy secret non-published list"  (I love to fire this guy up and it worked this time) ROTF.gif

 

   Phil Phil Phil your blender is on high speed and you missed the exit ramp. Sit down, put your clothes back on, stop pulling your hair out, slow down, calm down, breath and read on. We might be on to something here and you could be part of it. You big fuzzy dope. (Or "Jane you ignorant slut") What are you going to mount on a pair of Black Magics?  Spademans? Why I'll slap you silly you Retrosexual. No one is going to take away your ski industry decoder ring Peggy. I promise.

 

   It won't be 2-3 times when you bring in competition. Scuba Model.  Look at it. We're in the computer age. If you ran this through governmental means, yes you couldn't do it at all. 

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Let's say I know some people who know some people who could make this happen... what's it worth to you? Put a dollar figure on the initial cost and the yearly service. What would you spend for this relief from anxiety?

 

 



   WR,  Again the scuba regulator model will give you some figures and an idea in a way to track such a guaranteed item. No big dramatic event here in my suggestion. This will increase quality and get rid of a problem that, evidently some are in denial about. 

 

   Skis are better all the time now.

   Boots...... well geez are getting better.

   Bindings are stagnant and falling behind that much more every year. "Well we did come out with wider brakes for you guy's new skis."

 

  Anxiety is an excellent way to describe it when you know what I know. Thanks for that!

 

 

 

  I know exactly what Dr. Spademan was thinking way back then but I don't want to reinvent the wheel and roll the dice on a production run of something new. Let the schucks in the business making this stuff get this done. Good designs are already out there but they are made of crap in the wrong places.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post



It's not a warranty issue for me. I simply want a quality product at a fair price. If it's built properly of the right materials it will work for a long time.

 



    RS, Your the best. And achieve gold with every post.............Except!  The warranty issue is the hook to get the rest of what you and I want though. It will hold their feet to the fire. wink.gif



Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

Thread drift:

Binding Freedom and Quiver Killers are the two players so far. The owner of Binding Freedom is a mechanical engineer and was instrumental in the design of the Quiver Killers. They are for all intents and purposes the same in dimension and 5mm sized ss machine screws. Mounted flush or below flush. Proud is undesirable.

 

On topic:

The concept of these, IMO, is long over due and would give the consumer the choice to purchase more or less bindings, shared between multiple skis OR use AT or alpine or tele bindings on the same skis. A shop could offer this mount option to it's customers and the DIYer would have the choice to take on the risk to add inserts to their boards or not and use their favorite bindings. Give me gear I don't have to toss or unload every other year and I'd be willing to pay more for one solid, long term binding solution.

 

K2 used to make tele skis with inserts. Snowboards do. Aside from herding cats and other profit motivations, why not ski manufacturers or integrate a universal binding mount system?



   Drift all you want. This is exactly where I wanted this to go. Better Better Better..................What's wrong with herding cats? I do it every day and I'm in the association. biggrin.gif

 

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

 

   Skis will wear out, are sacrificial and expendable in what we do folks. The bindings are the life support part of what we do. What I'm so outrageous in suggesting that we actually get something that will foot the bill? No wonder bindings are in such a poor state of affairs. Why the hell should they bring forward anything better for us?

 

   I might have put this before the wrong group of people. I thought this was Epic Ski. 

(Sorry I had to throw that out there. I know I'm EEEEEEEvil He He..... Phil is still hyperventilating. Use the brown paper bag buddy. biggrin.gif

 


Edited by skimalibu - 11/13/11 at 10:53am
post #42 of 67

The Regulator pricing I just looked up seemed to range from $299 to over $1500. We seem to be talking 'premium product' here with this Lifetime Binding, is it safe to assume that premium regulator prices would apply? I'd love for someone to tell me they would honestly pay over a $1000 for an alpine ski binding.

 

(and Quiver killers cost $28 for inserts + $50 for install equipment + at least $13 worth of machine screws. Saying "$20 for inserts" is disingenuous at best.)

post #43 of 67

Any people out there using inserts for their mount?  I'd love to be able to swap Dukes on some of my skis if I need the touring capability and keep a resort binding on it the rest of the time.  Does drilling so many holes weaken the ski in any serious way?  

post #44 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

The Regulator pricing I just looked up seemed to range from $299 to over $1500. We seem to be talking 'premium product' here with this Lifetime Binding, is it safe to assume that premium regulator prices would apply? I'd love for someone to tell me they would honestly pay over a $1000 for an alpine ski binding.

 

(and Quiver killers cost $28 for inserts + $50 for install equipment + at least $13 worth of machine screws. Saying "$20 for inserts" is disingenuous at best.)


Didn't you sell one pair of those electronic Atomic bindings? I wonder if those still even work.

post #45 of 67

Alexzn, I've mounted a few skis with them. It is often a problem with hole-overlap, easily over come, but it's there. The screws are a major problem also, you need to swap out all of the binding screws to machine screws. It is difficult to match screw length and head shape so binding sit flush and secure to the ski. Is it impossible to source the 'right' screws? Absolutely not... but it IS something that will need to be done in the process of using QK inserts. usually 3 or 4 different length/head shape per binding type being used, for instance a Duke/FKS set-up would need 6 different screw types, etc.

 

(yes Epic, I did sell an Atomic EBT binding, the customer wanted it and was willing to pay for it so I got one.)

post #46 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

The Regulator pricing I just looked up seemed to range from $299 to over $1500. We seem to be talking 'premium product' here with this Lifetime Binding, is it safe to assume that premium regulator prices would apply? I'd love for someone to tell me they would honestly pay over a $1000 for an alpine ski binding.

 

(and Quiver killers cost $28 for inserts + $50 for install equipment + at least $13 worth of machine screws. Saying "$20 for inserts" is disingenuous at best.)



  Hell no! You can get the job done well for half that or $500 on a regulator and it is more than Phil's grandchildren will need.(Whoo got a chill!) You can see why I got the comparison and idea. The $1500 is for ice cave wreck diving while being chased by a herd of twenty hungry Great White Sharks regulator. No doubt your looking at the" if you've got the money we'll figure out a way to extract the dollars out of you marketed regulator". Like the Billy Kidd endorsed boots.

 

  I use my Scuba Pro 650 most of the time. But I have an Atomic M1. No rational human being needs this regulator. It is a Ferrari F1 performer. And it is not their top of the line. When I go deep I use it. Why because of the confidence I have in it, it's design and the crazy nuts that built it. That is why it has the only two year service interval. As all Atomic regulators do. We need the same in a ski binding.

 

  Your an extreme skier. And your name is always mentioned in films that everyone likes to watch. What are you going to use?

 

  You want people (everyone) to able to justify the extra few bucks. And not have a product gathering dust on a shelf in some warehouse in Utah. We could do the titanium /diamond encrusted model for Paris that will sit in a closet till she dies, if you like. But let's sell through first with a real user utility life binding. Something that is a Bomber beater. Selling a few units does nothing for you.

 

  I'd like to run three shifts with speed freaks building them (exaggerated for a grin) and not be able to keep up with demand. Let them stick their binding list and the ability to see it..

 

  I would think $300-$500 would be a good window for the "life binding". They already have the designs. I say again better materials. Plastic isn't bad the more I think about it. But where is it located in the binding? And is it ever a high stressed member of the assembly. See that does to me.  I have a friend that sells material testing equipment for many companies. He has forwarded my condition in this area.

 

 As Alexzn states. The incorporation of plates could be yet another great marketing tool to such a binding for a switch in versatility or users. Less remounts, screws and holes. I love it.

 

 If you are in the throws of moving on this PM me. But I think we need to flesh this out a bit more first here. Feedback from others is always good................ Well almost. Phil !

 

 Again this sickness is what I do. I take things to the next level and beyond. You can never know to much about anything in this life.

 

 

 

 

 



 


Edited by skimalibu - 11/13/11 at 3:06pm
post #47 of 67

Seriously folks, give me some numbers for this. RossiSmash stepped-up and gave a price level he'd be willing to support for the type of product he wants, $250. He says he doesn't care about a 'lifetime warranty'...

 

The OP referenced Diving Regulators as a model and yearly service intervals. What would you feel is an acceptable fee to have a binding dis-assembled, re-greased and cleaned and re-calibrated? I'm asking. Would this be a 'give away the razor to sell the blades' situation?

 

[edit: OK, Malibu chimed in. What does 'service' cost?]

post #48 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post


Didn't you sell one pair of those electronic Atomic bindings? I wonder if those still even work.



 Never heard of them. Electronics in the snow stressed. Hum. Sounds like my crazy boot plastic idea.

post #49 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

Seriously folks, give me some numbers for this. RossiSmash stepped-up and gave a price level he'd be willing to support for the type of product he wants, $250. He says he doesn't care about a 'lifetime warranty'...

 

The OP referenced Diving Regulators as a model and yearly service intervals. What would you feel is an acceptable fee to have a binding dis-assembled, re-greased and cleaned and re-calibrated? I'm asking. Would this be a 'give away the razor to sell the blades' situation?

 

[edit: OK, Malibu chimed in. What does 'service' cost?]



 I pay roughly $30 if before the time, to $60 if I forget, for an annual. Includes all parts and cycle testing on a rig with a hard copy readout.

 

 The ocean is a dirty corrosive environment to use anything in. Give me something used on snow any day.

 

post #50 of 67
Thread Starter 

The neighbor's dog is barking again nonstop. Funny that I should remember that gun makers offer a lifetime warranty also.  What?  Do you think? Come on now.........                                    


Edited by skimalibu - 11/13/11 at 2:09pm
post #51 of 67


 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by skimalibu View Post 

 

  I would think $300-$500 would be a good window for the "life binding". They already have the designs. I say again better materials. Plastic isn't bad the more I think about it. But where is it located in the binding? And is it ever a high stressed member of the assembly. See that does to me.  I have a friend that sells material testing equipment for many companies. He has forwarded my condition in this area.

 

 As Alexzn states. The incorporation of plates could be yet another great marketing tool to such a binding for a switch in versatility or users. Less remount screws and holes. I love it.

 

 If you are in the throws of moving on this PM me. But I think we need to flesh this out a bit more first here. Feedback from others is always good................ Well almost. Phil !

 

 

Rather that insert screws.....

 I really liked the Blizzard MAX plate system. With just one screw you can remove the binding, change it's for/aft position on the ski, even put it on another Bliz MAX ski AND best of all use ANY flat mount binding that YOU like on a Blizzard ski. Here's a perfect example. One year older Bliz 8.7 with hostage "marker" system binding. This is a nice ski with a (for me) less than desireable binding. Fast forward on year and we have a Bliz 8.1 MAX with the binding I want on it.

 

Here's the 2009 8.7

8.7.jpg

 

Here's the 8.1 MAX

8.1.jpg

 

 

post #52 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post


 

 

Rather that insert screws.....

 I really liked the Blizzard MAX plate system. With just one screw you can remove the binding, change it's for/aft position on the ski, even put it on another Bliz MAX ski AND best of all use ANY flat mount binding that YOU like on a Blizzard ski. Here's a perfect example. One year older Bliz 8.7 with hostage "marker" system binding. This is a nice ski with a (for me) less than desireable binding. Fast forward on year and we have a Bliz 8.1 MAX with the binding I want on it.

 

Here's the 2009 8.7

8.7.jpg

 

Here's the 8.1 MAX

8.1.jpg

 

 



 You scare me man. I was just thinking that Blizz would be a good forward thinking company that seems to be on a big roll to bring this all to.                     

 I think the Marker rail type system of old should be avoided. Poor choice of skis that were able to use that binding.

 The kind of binding I'm thinking of can and could be mounted on ANY ski.

 I do wonder if two different types are needed. One a plate. And another with a seperate toe and heal unit. That way all skis could be covered.

 


Edited by skimalibu - 11/13/11 at 3:25pm
post #53 of 67

Whiteroom, for your apples to bananas comparisons, what does a typical binding cost and the mounting cost variables?

 

Depending on how many skis you install inserts in at once and how they get mounted, the costs are variable. Same for the mounting costs of bindings. Be it DIY or pay a shop. The point being that with some sort of system, be it inserts, plates or whatever the concept of being able to own one pair of bindings and swap them onto x number of skis would cost a fraction of purchasing a pair of bindings for each ski. As a consumer, I'd like this flexibility and am utilizing it. You have boots you like, bindings sized for your boot size. You just need a standard connection between this set up and your multiple pair of skis.

 

The overlap of binding layouts is definitely and issue and needs to be paid attention to if trying to mount multiple bindings to the same pair. (download this as an example, use Adobe Layers to toggle combinations) Multiple mounts are possible, but a standard layout for bindings or a plate system would be great. This is not in the best interest of binding manufactures and down the line. Proprietary layouts and systems adds to the complexity and apparently to the bottom line. Same for frickin' cell phone companies, for example, with all the proprietary attachments and cords, versus a simple USB interface that works for everything.

 

An over simplification as an example is a camera mount on a tripod where there is a screw and a pin. It'll work on every camera I've ever owned and I imagine it's pretty universal. The tripod could be any number configurations, cost and styles, but the connection between it and the camera is the same screw and pin. Why not alpine bindings? It's not because it's not physically possible. There are plenty of other agendas at play.

 

For more background on inserts and a little history, check out this thread and the other links in the thread.

 

In lieu of inserts, check out Binding Freedom's plates for various binding pairs. With 8 inserts per ski, you could swap two pairs of bindings per ski with one set of plates.

 

dynaduke_plates_large.jpg

 

 


Edited by Alpinord - 11/13/11 at 5:20pm
post #54 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 

Depending on how many skis you install inserts in at once and how they get mounted, the costs are variable. Same for the mounting costs of bindings. Be it DIY or pay a shop. The point being that with some sort of system, be it inserts, plates or whatever the concept of being able to own one pair of bindings and swap them onto x number of skis would cost a fraction of purchasing a pair of bindings for each ski. As a consumer, I'd like this flexibility and am utilizing it. You have boots you like, bindings sized for your boot size. You just need a standard connection between this set up and your multiple pair of skis.

 

 

 

In lieu of inserts, check out Binding Freedom's plates for various binding pairs. With 8 inserts per ski, you could swap two pairs of bindings per ski with one set of plates.

 



To me, that's like removing the seat from your car to drive another one...

 

Ski and binding equal one usable pair. Are you gonna swap out the binding mid day to use a different pair at the base? No thanks.

 

And the BF plates are really just allowing you to switch from Alpine to AT....still using 2 pairs of bindings, this time with one pair of skis.

 

post #55 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post

To me, that's like removing the seat from your car to drive another one...

Ski and binding equal one usable pair. Are you gonna swap out the binding mid day to use a different pair at the base? No thanks.

 

It becomes a personal preference. If you want to buy multiple pairs of bindings and skis for an outing, go for it. If not, don't. If you want to ski more than one pair of skis, but don't want to own more bindings, the choice is yours.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossi Smash View Post
And the BF plates are really just allowing you to switch from Alpine to AT....still using 2 pairs of bindings, this time with one pair of skis.

 

You're missing the point. The concept of the plates is the point. The plates could be fabricated for whatever combination or just one and you only would need 8 holes per ski and swap the plates for your flavor binding. The interface is the same in the hole pattern from ski to ski. For you not appealing. For others, maybe.

 

Further, the hole pattern of the plates could be illustrative of a standard layout for bindings so you could use what ever flavor bindings with the same hole layout. The plates being representative of the binding to ski interface.....then you get your zillion dollar 'lifetime binding' option and can swap them to any number of skis you want if you are so inclined.....or don't.

Edit: I forgot to mention that for travelers, having a straight forward option to remove, reinstall and swap bindings could allow you to bring more skis more easily stacked in a bag versus dealing with the volume needed for the bindings. A solid, quick release system would be great.

 

Additional resources: Binding Freedom has been generating and confirming binding templates and you can download binding templates them here keep checking back as more get added over time.


Edited by Alpinord - 11/14/11 at 7:31am
post #56 of 67

Skis will wear out, are sacrificial and expendable in what we do folks. The bindings are the life support part of what we do. What I'm so outrageous in suggesting that we actually get something that will foot the bill? No wonder bindings are in such a poor state of affairs. Why the hell should they bring forward anything better for us?

 



A lifetime warranty won't accomplish this goal - as a way to convince wary customers that your new brand isn't crap (e.g., Hyundai) it is a useful marketing tool.  Otherwise, it is just numbers that will get built into the cost of the equipment, and the cost of administration will outweigh any benefit to the average user vs. replacement.

 

Now if the real question is a binding that won't ever fail in the hands (feet) of a 1% user.....that isn't a warranty question, that is a design question.  It is a useful goal to have 'maintenance' = 'replacement' because the cost point of replacement is so low vs. labor costs per hour that are so high.  Is anybody going to mail in their binding mid-season and wait for a replacement?  Are you going to have shops set up for this, the fixed costs of which are incorporated into the product cost whether or not they are utilized?  

 

The economics of manufacturing are so efficient compared to the economics of labor based repair that you can't afford to fix much of anything anymore.  Insuring it against replacement cost (a lifetime warranty is a lifetime full coverage maintenance contract with a replacement condition) would be something the insurer would make a lot of money on (binding failure statistics are probably very reliable) and the average user would gain no value for having.

 

In other words, the 99% would pay a lot more to insure the 1%, who probably would never have a claim due to conditions of usage, i.e. user caused failure outside of the design parameters of the equipment.

post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post


Didn't you sell one pair of those electronic Atomic bindings? I wonder if those still even work.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

 

(yes Epic, I did sell an Atomic EBT binding, the customer wanted it and was willing to pay for it so I got one.)



I am looking for a pair for my collection, if anyone comes across some, lemme know. 

post #58 of 67
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NayBreak View Post



A lifetime warranty won't accomplish this goal - as a way to convince wary customers that your new brand isn't crap (e.g., Hyundai) it is a useful marketing tool.  Otherwise, it is just numbers that will get built into the cost of the equipment, and the cost of administration will outweigh any benefit to the average user vs. replacement.

 

Now if the real question is a binding that won't ever fail in the hands (feet) of a 1% user.....that isn't a warranty question, that is a design question.  It is a useful goal to have 'maintenance' = 'replacement' because the cost point of replacement is so low vs. labor costs per hour that are so high.  Is anybody going to mail in their binding mid-season and wait for a replacement?  Are you going to have shops set up for this, the fixed costs of which are incorporated into the product cost whether or not they are utilized?  

 

The economics of manufacturing are so efficient compared to the economics of labor based repair that you can't afford to fix much of anything anymore.  Insuring it against replacement cost (a lifetime warranty is a lifetime full coverage maintenance contract with a replacement condition) would be something the insurer would make a lot of money on (binding failure statistics are probably very reliable) and the average user would gain no value for having.

 

In other words, the 99% would pay a lot more to insure the 1%, who probably would never have a claim due to conditions of usage, i.e. user caused failure outside of the design parameters of the equipment.



 You bring up good questions and points. And do know a bit. I think I've said enough to get the ball rolling somewhere. Thank you.

 


Edited by skimalibu - 11/13/11 at 9:00pm
post #59 of 67
Thread Starter 



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 

 



I am looking for a pair for my collection, if anyone comes across some, lemme know. 



 See that wasn't so bad, was it? Life is good. (At least we didn't need to hit you on the privates with the defibrillator or taser.)

 

 And you got a request out for an APB on another old binding for your collection              you sick pup.

 

post #60 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philpug View Post

 

 



I am looking for a pair for my collection, if anyone comes across some, lemme know. 



Dnaggit.   Missed reading this by a week.

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Lifetime Warranty on Ski Bindings ? Isn't it time?