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Veterans Day 2011

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Mom was invited to participate in a wreath placing ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial today.

 

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 Color guard

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Wreath presenters

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Taps

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Mom, a couple of my dad's West Point classmates and some Marines.

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Thanks today and every day to the Veterans for your service to our country. icon14.gif

 

 

 

 

 

post #2 of 13

Telerod, thanks for sharing this small glimpse into a powerful moment.

 

I had the opportunity to spend time at the moving vietnam memorial wall when I was visiting home in Michigan this summer.  It was a reverent time, observing those who sobbed over loved ones that were lost so many years ago.  

 

I'm not sure that reverent is a strong enough word to describe it.

 

post #3 of 13

Telerod15 Thank You for those photos. I wish I could have been there.

Those guys and others gave everything they had so we could live our lives the way we see fit.

 

+1 Thanks today and every day to the Veterans for your service to our country. icon14.gif

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

Yes, it was a moving experience. I was afraid I would break down but I only shed a few tears and I don't think anyone noticed.

 

Those old soldiers stood tall. The man in the Rudy Projects arrived and left in a wheelchair but he did not sit when it was his time to stand up.

 

 The ones who could not get out of their wheelchairs stood tall too.

post #5 of 13

amongst all the irrelevant threads something worth caring about. Thanks for sharing. And thanks to those from all nations who have sacrificed in hopes of a better world  

post #6 of 13

Thanks for sharing telerod.  Those pictures bring back the importance of today.  

 

post #7 of 13

A photo from the moving wall when it was in my home town this past summer.

 

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post #8 of 13

It is a sobering thought, thanks to those who served.  I feel very fortunate to lay between conflicts, wars, etc and grateful that when my brother and cousin served, it was 'only' cold war time. 

 

Public TV is running Vietnam War Stories, watched it last night and it really tugs at ones heart.  Knowing folks who served from WWII though our current wars, I really can't appreciate more what many have given for us, whether one agrees with why, it doesn't take away from what they give.  Bless them and their families.

 

 

post #9 of 13

First, thanks for the post.

 
I fought, shot, and got shot (technically my helmet got shot, but I WAS wearing it at the time, and nothing else..but that is another story :) )  in the gulf war.  Combat itself for me was mostly an intermittently adrenalin punctuated fugue of pure exhaustion (for 5 days after sitting in the desert bored mindless for 6 mo).  I can't imagine the psychic toll on the troops pulling repeated prolonged tours in the "war on terror", or the difficulties of vietnam, or how about leaving home for 4 to 5 years straight in WWII.  
 
Got a little sidetracked there.....my point is that much more emotional for me than combat was some of the ceremonies.  The military has had centuries to perfect these, and they work.  I will still feel a little full in the throat at a simple flag change done well.  By far the most potent ceremony I (too often) took part in was the last roll call.  It is a small unit ceremony that I suspect few who have not served have witnessed (FELT).  I stole the description below, as you read it keep in mind that every time the dead doesn't answer, the first sergeant's call to him becomes louder, more strident, almost angry.  It is ...eerie...haunting.  I cried at more than one of these.
 
 
For those who don't know about the last roll call.  It is part of a memorial ceremony when a soldier in a unit is killed.  The company first sergeant or the platoon sergeant depending on how big the ceremony is will call off the names of everybody in the unit.  Everybody responds with "Here first sergeant" or "here sergeant".  The dead soldiers name is said last.  It is first called out with as rank and last name eg. Pvt. Doe.  Of course there is no response so then it is called out with rank first and last name eg. Pvt. John Doe... and then the last time the name is called it is rank, first, middle, and last name eg. Pvt John Joeseph Doe. After there is no response for the third time the firing squad of 7 people fires three volleys and then taps is played.  The ceremony includes a display of boots with a rifle stuck in the ground between them and a helmet resting on top, and also the person's picture.

 


Edited by Alveolus - 11/11/11 at 9:21pm
post #10 of 13

To all Vets past and present:  worship.gif

 

post #11 of 13

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post

To all Vets past and present:  worship.gif

 

Thanks but seems a bit much.  Speaking only for this one vet, an occasional beer wouldn't be sneezed at however.
 

 

 

post #12 of 13

I'd buy one anytime should we or any vet I meet up with, whether they served peace time or war time service, it's the least one can do. 

post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alveolus View Post

First, thanks for the post.

 
I fought, shot, and got shot (technically my helmet got shot, but I WAS wearing it at the time, and nothing else..but that is another story :) )  in the gulf war.  Combat itself for me was mostly an intermittently adrenalin punctuated fugue of pure exhaustion (for 5 days after sitting in the desert bored mindless for 6 mo).  I can't imagine the psychic toll on the troops pulling repeated prolonged tours in the "war on terror", or the difficulties of vietnam, or how about leaving home for 4 to 5 years straight in WWII.  
 
Got a little sidetracked there.....my point is that much more emotional for me than combat was some of the ceremonies.  The military has had centuries to perfect these, and they work.  I will still feel a little full in the throat at a simple flag change done well.  By far the most potent ceremony I (too often) took part in was the last roll call.  It is a small unit ceremony that I suspect few who have not served have witnessed (FELT).  I stole the description below, as you read it keep in mind that every time the dead doesn't answer, the first sergeant's call to him becomes louder, more strident, almost angry.  It is ...eerie...haunting.  I cried at more than one of these.
 
 
For those who don't know about the last roll call.  It is part of a memorial ceremony when a soldier in a unit is killed.  The company first sergeant or the platoon sergeant depending on how big the ceremony is will call off the names of everybody in the unit.  Everybody responds with "Here first sergeant" or "here sergeant".  The dead soldiers name is said last.  It is first called out with as rank and last name eg. Pvt. Doe.  Of course there is no response so then it is called out with rank first and last name eg. Pvt. John Doe... and then the last time the name is called it is rank, first, middle, and last name eg. Pvt John Joeseph Doe. After there is no response for the third time the firing squad of 7 people fires three volleys and then taps is played.  The ceremony includes a display of boots with a rifle stuck in the ground between them and a helmet resting on top, and also the person's picture.

 


Thank you for risking everything for us. I cannot find words to express my gratitude. And thanks for the post. It made me feel " ...a little full in the throat..."  reading it.

 

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