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Ski purchasing advice

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hello, I'm new to the forum. I am looking into buying a new pair of skis and I'm looking for some input regarding which skis might be best for me to consider.  I've been skiing all my life but till two years ago I've been a very...recreational skier.  I've since become a lot more...passionate about it.  On a scale of 1-10 I'd gauge my talents between 5-7/8.  I'm looking for a ski that would help me transition to a full blown advanced/expert skier, help improve my technique, would allow me to explore off-piste as I'm interested in eventually trying out powder skiing but the hills in my vicinity don't really offer that. Also I'd like the ski to have good turning and be fairly forgiving.  Affordability is a consideration as well but I'd like to hear some high-end options as well.  There are some local deals near me that I'm considering,

 

There is a pair of 2012 Atomic Smoke TL's complete with bindings available for $399, I've tried to find some information on the ski but all I can find really is the Smoke and Smoke TI.  There is another deal nearby for a pair of Volkl RTM...not sure which model exactly, it may be the 73, but it includes marker bindings and poles for $350 or for $550 it includes a matching pair of Atomic boots.  The latter deal ends pretty soon so some insight into that would be appreciated as it seems like quite a bargain.

 

Thanks for any and all help.

post #2 of 17

Welcome to Epic- don't get the boots as an add on UNLESS YOU GET FITTED AND KNOW THEY ARE COMPATIBLE FOR YOU.  Most people buy boots that are too big as they either don't get a proper shell fit and/or the liner packs out during the first 20-30 days skiing.

 

If you don't have properly fitting boots, focus on this first and them demo skis to figure out what type of ski you like.  Don't be afraid to buy used skis if they are the correct model and in good shape, but don't go cheap on boots that are not right for you.

 

I'm not familiar with those skis, but it would help to know where you ski as the typical conditions/terrain you encounter should influence your choice.  Also knowing your size helps with recommendations.

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the welcome.  Yeah, I'd be sure to have them fit the boots. I wouldn't have a problem with used skis, but buying used online I have some concerns with. I ski in southern Wisconsin for the most part, though I have been getting out to Breckenridge, and that'll continue this year.  I am 168cm tall.

post #4 of 17

Breck is where Jeff Bergeron fitted my boots.  He does NOT sell boots.  Rather, he charges $100 to closely look at your foot and has you try on a variety of boots available at the shop where he rents space (and will tell you where to go if he thinks you belong in a boot they don't stock).  You are then free to buy the proper boot from anywhere you like- I got mine online for just over $200.  If you get foot beds from him, he will apply the $100 to their cost and will also do extra work on the boot once you buy it (charges vary).  He really knows boots (and is a good skier also).

 

As far as skis go, I'd be inclined to pick up a  versatile carving ski (used with some life left), then add something wider later for your trips West.  I'd have to know your weight, but given your height, you'd be looking at the shorter men's sizes (or the middle women's sizes).

 

If come with a group and want to give all the Summit County places a try, consider my place in Frisco


Edited by MEfree30 - 11/29/11 at 3:13am
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

Any specific ski(s) that comes to mind?  I actually went over to a ski shop earlier today to see what they advised, I was pointed towards the Atomic RTM 80 or the Rossignol experience 76.  He was also suggesting I get them in the 176-181cm range which sounds like a bit much...

 

I'm going out there with just a couple of people this year, but I'll try to keep that offer in mind for future trips.

post #6 of 17

The single most important thing you can do to improve your skiing is get boots that fit your feet and have them fitted by someone who seriously knows what they are doing.  I spent a lot of money over the years buying hot skiis and bargain boots and always wondering why I didn't get better.  When I finally bought boots from someone who knew how to fit them, my skiing improved almost instantly and quite dramatically because I was suddenly able to control my skis, they did what I "told" them to do.  Do not be duped into thinking that skis will really make any difference until after you get boots that are properly fitted.  Until you do that, you are just throwing away your money.

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

Sounds like I might have to pay Mr. Bergeron a visit when I get out to Breck.  Thanks for the tip.

post #8 of 17

Unless you are heavy and strong for your 168 cm, a ski that is 176-181 is too long for a level 6+- from Wisconsin...I haven't skied any of the newest models...there are lots of ski reviews here, have you read any?

 

These might work to help improve carving 

http://www.epicski.com/t/106382/fs-head-super-shape-skis-165cm-tyrolia-pro-demo-slide-bindings or

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2010-Dynastatr-Contact-Groove-Ti-PX12-Bindings-165-cm-/130596218651?pt=Skiing&hash=item1e6824271b#ht_500wt_1282

Dynastar Contact 10/11/Ltd (depending on year) 72 mm underfoot

 

Wider skis will likely work better in Breck, but might not be as user friendly learning to carve on hard snow...the Sultan 85 seemed pretty popular

 

Lots of good skis out there...you could try PMing Philpug to see if he has a recommendation he can hook you up with.

 

Depending on your dates, Chalet Frisco can be configured as a 2 bedroom


Edited by MEfree30 - 11/7/11 at 12:41am
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

I've read a few over the past couple of weeks as I was searching for reviews on certain skis, thats how I came across this site.

 

I'll keep an eye out for the skis you've just mentioned and message Philpug, thanks again you've been a big help.

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post

Unless you are heavy and strong for your 168 cm, a ski that is 176-181 is too long for a level 6+- from Wisconsin...I haven't skied any of the newest models...there are lots of ski reviews here, have you read any?

 

These might work to help improve carving 

http://www.epicski.com/t/106382/fs-head-super-shape-skis-165cm-tyrolia-pro-demo-slide-bindings or

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2010-Dynastatr-Contact-Groove-Ti-PX12-Bindings-165-cm-/130596218651?pt=Skiing&hash=item1e6824271b#ht_500wt_1282

Dynastar Contact 10/11/Ltd (depending on year) 72 mm underfoot

 

Wider skis will likely work better in Breck, but might not be as user friendly learning to carve on hard snow...the Sultan 85 seemed pretty popular

 

Lots of good skis out there...you could try PMing Philpug to see if he has a recommendation he can hook you up with.

 

Depending on your dates, Chalet Frisco can be configured as a 2 bedroom



I agree here, the depending on the ski, a 165-170 should suffice you fine. You mentioned the Atomic Smoke in your initial post, that is a good choice along with a K2 Rictor, Fischer Motive 80, Blizzard Magnum 7.6 and the Rossi 76. If I can help you with the purchase let me know. 

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 

Appreciate the advise Phil, It'll come in handy.  Saw a used pair of Sultan 85's on ebay, at the time the price was $126 with around 12 hours to go, I hesitated due to lack of pictures showing the condition of the skis and an absurd $75 for shipping, I don't recall a clear length given just listed at 160-170.  Anyways, they didn't sell as the reserve wasn't met so maybe they'll go back up with a better posting.

 

*Edit* For clarrification Phil, were you referring to the Rossi Experience 76 or the Avenger 76? Also what of the Atomic Blackeye TI?


Edited by Beryl 96 - 11/10/11 at 12:36pm
post #12 of 17

Beware of used skis on Fleabay.  I would not buy used skis unless I either knew the seller or could inspect them very carefully and I would definitely not buy used skis on-line without a return privilege.

post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hey there again, I've been eyeing this pair of 2011 Legend Sultan 80s. MeFree, I know you said the 85 would be good, wondering if you've got any opinion on these.

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beryl 96 View Post

Hey there again, I've been eyeing this pair of 2011 Legend Sultan 80s. MeFree, I know you said the 85 would be good, wondering if you've got any opinion on these.


To be clear, my opinion was based on a lot of reviews that I read which seemed to speak more of the 85 than the 80.  This is what http://www.expertskier.com/ said in their reviews

 

 

Strong skiers will probably still prefer the 85; ours did.

But, the majority of less than level 9 skiers will likely enjoy the 80 more than the more demanding 85. Well mannered, smooth and predictable.

Fast, aggressive skiers, see the Sultan 85.

 

I don't recall anyone here on Epic calling the 85 demanding, FWIW, but the majority of reviews are posted by level 7 to 9 skiers.

 

post #15 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by MEfree30 View Post


To be clear, my opinion was based on a lot of reviews that I read which seemed to speak more of the 85 than the 80.  This is what http://www.expertskier.com/ said in their reviews

 

 

Strong skiers will probably still prefer the 85; ours did.

But, the majority of less than level 9 skiers will likely enjoy the 80 more than the more demanding 85. Well mannered, smooth and predictable.

Fast, aggressive skiers, see the Sultan 85.

 

I don't recall anyone here on Epic calling the 85 demanding, FWIW, but the majority of reviews are posted by level 7 to 9 skiers.

 


With a little patience and searching, you should be able to find a good left-over ski for cheap.  Fat skis are all the rage, these days, but not the best for improving technique, nor for skiing on hard snow, so maybe you will luck out and find an unpopular skinny ski a shop wants to get rid of.

 

What to get.   First, get a subscription to the site in the post above.  It has reviews of skis from the last decade and more, listing stats, strengths, weaknesses, speed ranges, suitable ability levels, and impressions.  Judging from skis I have been on that have been reviewed, they are pretty decent reviews.  Second, get a ski for the conditions you ski most often.  Assuming you ski in a lot of resorts where they groom the runs or they end up being icy moguls, that means a rather thin expert-level ski.  Rent something else when you go where they have good ungroomed deep-snow skiing.   Get between 170 and 180, the closer to 170, the better.  Get a radius under 15 m for the specific purpose of making more turns (longer is more fun at speed, but you didn't as for a ski to enjoy blasting along at gs/sg speeds).  Narrower is better.   Get a ski that includes the expert (black shushing skier icon).  Make a short list or just keep checking the site when you see a ski on sale.

 

Boots first!  I went back to my old race boots on the last day of last season, and even though I knew it mattered I was amazed at how much it mattered. 

 

post #16 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot to both of you.  The boots I've got now are still serviceable, the ski's though I've literally outgrown and they just don't seem to hold up to what I demand of them.  They're short for me(162), slow, and don't hold an edge real well(at least not through a patch of untouched groomed ice), and that last bit cost me last season, was paying off medical bills till earlier this month haha.  I will definitely look into getting a good pair of boots once I replenish my funds from the holiday shopping.  I asked about these Sultan's because I suspect I may be getting a pair for Christmas.

post #17 of 17

If your boots are too big, which is likely, no ski will be up to what you want it to do because your foot has to move inside the boot before the ski will react.  By that time it is almost always too late.

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