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Ski movie deaths - Page 2

post #31 of 62

Some of the best ski porn I've seen in a while have been by Powderwhore productions, JH Airforce, Bill Kerig.........Ski porn with a background.

 

So many ski movies are ski porn at this area, and ski porn at that area.......and so on, which reminds me of Travelog at the Rotary.  I'm sure the ski porn makers need to pimp the resorts to get their sponsor dollars, so I understand, but I enjoy a movie "about something" much more.

 

If you haven't seen it, you should go get Swift Silent Deep.  THAT's an awesome ski movie!

 

There are people who were featured in that movie that are dead too.  One died recently of natural causes.

post #32 of 62

The notion that movies aren't showing full lines being skied is ludicrous. Most of the featured athletes are looking for the most aesthetic lines they can find. Not just for the camera, but for their own personal goals. I own just about every major release in the past 3 years as well as a ton of lesser known. All these movies contain lots of diverse skiing. From tree's to pillows to big mountain lines. I even have most of the more jib oriented films. They all bring their own value to the table, and all have great skiing.

 

The people that are dying aren't dying filming. For the most part they are succumbing to small factors that have big consequences. Stuff that the mountains are full of. Stuff that most of us don't encounter in our daily skiing. Anyone who spends a lot of time in alpine sports performing on the cutting edge is going to encounter dangers, and will have lost friends. And it's not because Sean Pettit is hucking his meat off a 60 ft cliff into soft snow.

post #33 of 62

2008, Billy Poole, working with a Warren Miller film crew, died executing a large cliff drop during filming. It was tragic and the crew packed up and went home to regroup.

 

Ski porn stars have different identities and different skiing styles. Some seem to be in more danger in their choice of persona than others.

 

Some skiers that have lost their lives, whether professionals or not, have such great physical strength and such developed skills that their ski technique is not the weakness that puts them in danger. It is the overconfidence in their strength and technique that is the tragic flaw.  A thousand factors that figure into the conditions of the moment, including stuff about your life, have to be balanced in your mind.

 

A friend has said several times, he skis BC and Squaw and is a skilled mountaineer, that people too often take the resort attitude of "pushing it" out into sketchier BC venues where it is a poor fit, sometimes leading to accidents.

 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

So who has died while filming for TG, MSP, etc? It's also ridiculous to say that all you have seen is sttraightline to hucks. Do you people even watch ski movies?

 

 

 

 

 



 


Edited by davluri - 11/6/11 at 9:23am
post #34 of 62

Maybe I'm old fashioned but I'd way rather see a long sequence of great turns on epic terrain in deep powder.  Those sick jumps do nothing for me.  And that's probably how most of the deaths occur: hucking ridiculous cliffs.

 

Maybe I'm a minority.  But why do they assume I want to see massive air all day?  It's boring.  I'd rather see a better version of what I can already do.


Edited by hirustler - 11/6/11 at 10:22am
post #35 of 62

It would interest me to know what people find to be the climax or the focus or the best part of a ski porn film. example: I like first a long narrow cliff enclosed couloir that a skier makes turns through. second: dropping into a huge steep untracked face with lots of terrain, cliff bands, chutes, ridges and gulleys. Trees are a beautiful third. cliff dropping a distant 6th or so. One of my favorite scenes of hundreds of awesome scenes, is Nobis and Black simult-skiing a long, narrow, steep couloir in Italy I believe. wow, just wow. Also, Hoji on a big Alaska face, Davenport skiing a complicated line, Seth ripping it, Hugo stomping at speed, Roner base that couloir, Shane those first unexpected and shocking launches into space.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post

Maybe I'm old fashioned but I'd way rather see a long sequence of great turns on epic terrain in deep powder.  Those sick jumps do nothing for me.  And that's probably how most of the deaths occur: hucking ridiculous cliffs.

 

Maybe I'm a minority.  But why do they assume I want to see massive air all day.  It's boring.  I'd rather see a better version of what I can already do.



 

post #36 of 62



Fully agree. I'd bet that most skiers would rather see something they can do themselves, rather than watching people huck massive cliffs all day, which most skiers can't do

Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post

Maybe I'm old fashioned but I'd way rather see a long sequence of great turns on epic terrain in deep powder.  Those sick jumps do nothing for me.  And that's probably how most of the deaths occur: hucking ridiculous cliffs.

 

Maybe I'm a minority.  But why do they assume I want to see massive air all day.  It's boring.  I'd rather see a better version of what I can already do.



 

post #37 of 62

I prefer to see skiing that is beyond my personal ability or guts.....I'll own up to that.


Edited by davluri - 11/6/11 at 12:44pm
post #38 of 62


Quote:

Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

The notion that movies aren't showing full lines being skied is ludicrous. Most of the featured athletes are looking for the most aesthetic lines they can find. Not just for the camera, but for their own personal goals. I own just about every major release in the past 3 years as well as a ton of lesser known. All these movies contain lots of diverse skiing. From tree's to pillows to big mountain lines. I even have most of the more jib oriented films. They all bring their own value to the table, and all have great skiing.

 

The people that are dying aren't dying filming. For the most part they are succumbing to small factors that have big consequences. Stuff that the mountains are full of.

Stuff that most of us don't encounter in our daily skiing. Anyone who spends a lot of time in alpine sports performing on the cutting edge is going to encounter dangers, and will have lost friends. And it's not because Sean Pettit is hucking his meat off a 60 ft cliff into soft snow.

 

Doug Coombs died when he slipped on some rocks trying to get a view of Chad VanderHam, who had just fallen off a cliff approximately 50m high, (163ft). He was not actually "skiing" at the time, not hucking, doing 50mph, or dropping anything. Basically, he was sidestepping. He had called for a rope, but slipped before anything was set up.

They were skiing the Le Polichinelle Couloir  at La Grave. Coombs guided there and had his Steep and Deep camps there often. Except for a couple of marked trails, it is guide only skiing as the exposure can get serious quickly. In the movie Steep, he talks about "getting complacent" in Alaska and taking risks, (avalanche), that he wouldn't have when he started. Moving to La Grave was part of breaking that. He talked about how you could go from sipping a cappucino to the most extreme skiing in minutes there.

 

You can read a report on the accident here by Matt Farmer, one of the four in the party. It is the basis for most stories on the event.

http://pistehors.com/news/ski/comments/two-americans-killed-in-la-grave-ski-accident/

 

Supposedly, this picture is Coombs and VanderHam skiing on the run they were killed. I've never seen it before, there's no attribution, description, or context for the page other than "Doug Coombs and Chad VanderHam, extreme skiers on their last run at La Grave, France"

It appears on a Christian UK website called Grace. Why it's there is a mystery. If it is what it says, it would've been taken by Matt F. or Christina B on April 3, 2006.

 

Based on descriptions of the route, I would think that's the town of Les Freaux below. That based on description of the possible route on the Skiers Lodge website. They run guided trips out of their hotel in La Grave: http://www.skierslodge.com/legend/#  They list that run as "serious". There is a "very serious", and an "extremely serious" designation also.

 

How deceptive photos are. It does not convey the danger of the situation.

 

Doug_Coombs_last_run.preview.jpg

from: http://www.freshworship.org/node/292           (photo not attributed)

 

An article on VanderHam, 31, underscores ecimmortal's point in this thread. He grew up in Minnesota, went to CO State, and spent some time at A Basin. He was a resident of Keystone, CO at the time of his death.

 

Quote:
VanderHam was the rare extreme skier. He did not enter contests, did not flaunt his talents and was not after a video segment. All he ever wanted was to be one of the elite — without the attention that comes with it.

"Local dies skiing with Doug Coombs"

BY DEVON O’NEIL

summit daily newsWednesday, April 5, 2006

http://www.summitdaily.com/article/20060405/NEWS/60406002

 

There are more photos of the run on which they were killed in this blog for the Denver Post. The photos were taken by Joe Vallone, a friend of Coombs and VanderHam and who went up there on the recovery mission.

See here:

"Coombs-VanderHam accident report"

Posted April 10, 2006, 9:19 pm MT

By   http://blogs.denverpost.com/sports/2006/04/10/coombs-vanderham-accident-report/612/

 

This photo is described as, "The point where Doug Coombs and Chad Vanderham were last seen."

 

20060411_081221_1-3rdcoulouirandlastscenepointforchadanddoug.jpg

Photo by Joe Vallone

 

 

This photo from a different angle gives a better idea and shows the mandatory left turn. That's the cliff on the left of the photo they fell off. Again, the picture doesn't convey the danger.

20060411_081816_3-mandatoryturn.jpg

Photo by Joe Vallone

 

VanderHam's ski stuck in the snow. Beyond that point, they both were killed by the fall:

 

20060411_081512_2-chadsskiaslastseen.jpg

Photo by Joe Vallone

 

 

This quote from Joe Vallone on VanderHam further illustrates the guy's approach.

Quote:

When it came to partners, hands down there was no discussion: Chad was the man and the best partner in crime you could ever ask for. Never said much about his skiing or what he did; didn’t seem to care either because he was too busy thinking of the next adventure. He loved life and the mountains like no one else. His composure in the mountains was unmatched. Attention to detail in such a calm demeanor even when things were going up the river. He had the head and the skills to solve any mountain situation.

from:

"A memorial to Chad VanderHam"

By

Posted April 10, 2006, 9:19 pm MT

http://blogs.denverpost.com/sports/2006/04/10/a-memorial-to-chad-vanderham/615/

 

Filming may push people, but I agree with ecimmortal, it's not a direct cause of a lot of the deaths.

A lot of the most dangerous places are rarely filmed, because they just don't show up that way, and you certainly can't go fast on them.

Dangerous is dangerous.

post #39 of 62

edit:  also, Great post /\/\/\

 

 

You could be completely correct about the 38 number, but don't most of the "skiing" related deaths get labeled "drownings" to keep that number down? 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

In 2009/2010 38 people died skiing at ski areas:

http://www.nsaa.org/nsaa/press/facts-ski-snbd-safety.asp

 

Skiing isn't safe, and a lot of non-skiers seem to think JSA (just skiing along) at ski areas is too dangerous, probably because they don't understand the motivations, rewards, and objective risks - they just see fatalities.  I suspect it's the same for ski mountaineers and extreme skiers.  I guess it depends on your perspective.  

 

And FWIW, Kip Garre wasn't skiing for a movie (or in a ski area) when he was killed.  I believe he wasn't skiing either, but climbing, but I could be wrong.



 

post #40 of 62

One factor, as I understand it, is that Chad and Doug were not equals, as in being ski buddies of roughly equal experience and skills. It is a major factor in this tragic incident. If this photo is real, you can see that.

 

looking at the photos of Davenport booting up during rescue efforts, I can not reconcile them with the Vallone photos. One is above a snowfield, the other above a forest. I'm missing something, I'm sure, or photos used are not all of the same event.

 

damn Explosiv's.

 

 


Edited by davluri - 11/7/11 at 10:08am
post #41 of 62

McConkey is the only one I can think of...
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post

So who has died while filming for TG, MSP, etc?

 

 



 

post #42 of 62

Wow, Tog, welcome back from your summer break!  Nice post, as usual!

post #43 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

McConkey is the only one I can think of...
 



 


I would honestly characterize that as a base jumping accident.

 

post #44 of 62


Billy Poole, RIP

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

McConkey is the only one I can think of...
 



 


The Coombs accident has nothing to do with films or pushing the envelope into (glorifying) a dangerous type of skiing, but does anyone have the problems I do with those photos?  And I will say that one of the best skiers in the world taking a person making that turn into that terrain is really strange.  When it's fall and death slide, your arms have to be in, your edge check has to be all the way around. I don't get it at all. I'm truly sorry if it sounds like I'm disrespecting a person who has passed away. I have felt the loss of Doug almost personally, such a huge loss for all of skiing.

 

post #45 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by habacomike View Post

So, I do wonder how much these guys and gals get paid to take such risks.  I bought both Attack of La Nina and One for the Road.  They were pretty cheap.  I can't imagine the segment that is willing shell out the shekels to either own them or see them is that big.  Looking at the casts of the movies, can these folk get more than a few thousand dollars for their appearance?  Even 50k?  Seems pretty unlikely.

 

James Heim's line in Attack of La Nina was unbelievable.  That spine must've been 60+ degrees.  And if he fell off of the traverse into it, a real possibility, he might not have made it.  And Rahlves continues to push the envelope of what is possible on skis.  All of these folk are taking big risks.  For what?  a few thousand bucks, and free heli rides?

 

Perhaps they need a union.  And this from the right wing Republican.

 

Mike


 

the thing is they would be doing it nor matter, the biggest deal for most of the people I have met is they get to fly for free.

 

post #46 of 62
post #47 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

 

Supposedly, this picture is Coombs and VanderHam skiing on the run they were killed. I've never seen it before, there's no attribution, description, or context for the page other than "Doug Coombs and Chad VanderHam, extreme skiers on their last run at La Grave, France"

It appears on a Christian UK website called Grace. Why it's there is a mystery. If it is what it says, it would've been taken by Matt F. or Christina B on April 3, 2006.

 

Doug_Coombs_last_run.preview.jpg

from: http://www.freshworship.org/node/292           (photo not attributed)

 


This one is in the NY Times, attributed to Matt Farmer.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/17/sports/othersports/17ski.html?ex=1305518400&en=e60e8fffe9031473&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

 

post #48 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post


Billy Poole, RIP


The Coombs accident has nothing to do with films or pushing the envelope into (glorifying) a dangerous type of skiing, but does anyone have the problems I do with those photos?  And I will say that one of the best skiers in the world taking a person making that turn into that terrain is really strange.  When it's fall and death slide, your arms have to be in, your edge check has to be all the way around. I don't get it at all. I'm truly sorry if it sounds like I'm disrespecting a person who has passed away. I have felt the loss of Doug almost personally, such a huge loss for all of skiing.

 


Hey, dav.  I don't take your post as disrespecting anybody but I do want to reply.

 

I honestly don't think it's fair to come to any conclusions at all regarding VanderHam's skiing based on the 1/250th of a second (give or take) that the camera shutter was open while he was making that turn.

 

I say that for a couple of reasons...

 

1. As someone who has taken thousands and thousands of skiing photos over the last several years, I can tell you without any reservation that a single image can make the very best of skiers look horrible.  Conversely, even a very poor skier can look like a rock star in a single exposure.  I've skied quite a bit over the years with several really, REALLY good skiers (Doug included) and there are moments in their technical runs that really don't look good if you isolate that instant when the camera shutter is open.

 

2. The street-level chatter here in JH when the incident occurred was that no one among Doug's friends doubted that VanderHam was completely qualified to be on skis in that couloir on that day.  Doug was an outstanding judge of skier ability.  I don't believe he would ever have put anyone into a truly dangerous situation (which this obviously was) without full confidence in their skills.  You mention that you took Doug's loss very hard - you can imagine how it felt here in Jackson Hole.  The interesting consequence of incidents like this (skiing, climbing, mountaineering, etc) is that the community of experts will very quickly sift through the reports and focus in on the weak link or poor decision (if there was one) that led to the disaster.  To my knowledge, no one here ever questioned Doug's decision making or VanderHam's ability.  

 

When someone starts down a couloir like that, there's no way of knowing for sure if the conditions will be favorable all the way down.  There are times when crap happens and this may have been one of them.

 

 

 

post #49 of 62

Yes, of course - I was just saying that's the only death I can think of that actually occurred while they were filming a ski movie.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ecimmortal View Post


I would honestly characterize that as a base jumping accident.

 



 

post #50 of 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

2. The street-level chatter here in JH when the incident occurred was that no one among Doug's friends doubted that VanderHam was completely qualified to be on skis in that couloir on that day.  Doug was an outstanding judge of skier ability.  I don't believe he would ever have put anyone into a truly dangerous situation (which this obviously was) without full confidence in their skills.  

 

 

I meant to post this from that NYT article I linked:

 

 

A former ski racer from Minnesota, Mr. VanderHam had been skiing with Mr. Coombs since visiting La Grave years earlier as a client in one of the steep-skiing camps. He showed an enthusiasm and ability that led Mr. Coombs to take him under his wing.

"Chad really admired Doug," Mrs. Coombs said. "By the time they skied that last run together, they were more equals."

post #51 of 62

Quote:

Originally Posted by segbrown View Post


This one is in the NY Times, attributed to Matt Farmer.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/17/sports/othersports/17ski.html?ex=1305518400&en=e60e8fffe9031473&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

 

Excellent article! Thanks for posting. That solves that on the photo. Strange how google brought up that other site.


Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post


Billy Poole, RIP


The Coombs accident has nothing to do with films or pushing the envelope into (glorifying) a dangerous type of skiing, but does anyone have the problems I do with those photos?  And I will say that one of the best skiers in the world taking a person making that turn into that terrain is really strange. 

 

When it's fall and death slide, your arms have to be in, your edge check has to be all the way around. I don't get it at all. I'm truly sorry if it sounds like I'm disrespecting a person who has passed away. I have felt the loss of Doug almost personally, such a huge loss for all of skiing.

 

 

davluri,

That guy who's making the turn in the photo had achieved AMGA's,  Ski Mountaineering Guide Certification about 3 weeks before.  That's one of the three elements of the total certifications leading to be an IMGA certifide guide. The other two being Alpine Guide certification and Rock Guide certification. He was well experienced in that terrain also. It was nothing new for him. He was completely qualified to be there.

 

The Mountains are dangerous. Things happen. That's the point.

 

The best statement is in that NY Times Article by Emily Coombs:

 

Quote: About Doug Coombs Death:

"He  just slipped looking for Chad, and he didn't have all his senses because it was a friend," she said in the telephone interview. "A little adrenaline probably made him react a little more quickly than he would have."  - Emily Coombs

 

"Skiing Beyond Safety's Edge Once Too Often", pg. 3

Published: May 17, 2006

 

Here's the Ski Mountaineering Guide Exam:

http://amga.com/programs/ski_SMGE.php

 

Chad Vanderham AMGA Scholarship:

http://amga.com/programs/schol_chadvanderham.php

Doug Coombs Memorial Fund:

http://www.getoutdoors.com/goblog/index.php?/archives/539-Doug-Coombs-Memorial-Fund.html

 

post #52 of 62
Thread Starter 

So... lots of food for thought.  I appreciate everybody who has posted on this thread.  I supposed I should have been more careful in the title.  I apologize for a lack of specificity on my part.   

 

Summary:  people do all sorts of crazy s#$t. Sometimes the camera's rolling, sometimes not.   They aren't always paid, usually it's for "the stoke".    Even if they're as well prepared as possible, s#$t happens and people die.  We glorify their exploits (when it works).   When it doesn't work they get an obituary.   

 

Not sure I'll ever get anything resolved in my own mind about any of this.  I'm a therapist and often deal with people who are grieving a loss.  I guess my perspective is to try to minimize unnecessary losses.   

 

 

 

 

 

post #53 of 62

No apologies needed here.

(hey, no one mentioned the headgear issue...I didn't use that other word, cause the spambots will find it and hijack the thread)

 

There's definitely something to the movie thing, though a look at the deaths belies that fact. I don't know the numbers, but it seems as if very few were actually filming when they died.

What do you say about climbing mountains?  It's similar, and people die.  Probably more even.

 

I'd recommend the films "Steep", and "Edge of Never"  here. It gives a little perspective beyond just filming. I'm sure someone else will recommend something else.

 

To minimize "unnecessary" losses, you just have to not go out there. Once you go into the mountains in that type of terrain, it's dangerous.  Most of those people were definitely unwilling to stay home and stay safe. They needed to go out there. It's just the way it is. Humans have always been that way. Hey, maybe it's selfish, but that's a judgement based on being safe is always right.

post #54 of 62

I really wasn't able to say what I meant (and will likely fail again).

 

Judgement was fine all around. that wasn't it. It was execution. It appeared in the photo that we are seeing the turn that starts the run with the dogleg. In the moment we see, the skier's position seems not to be establishing total control. If it's just an awkward split second, well my error, and no disrespect is meant. I hope it has now been long enough to say that. My mind says: something went wrong. what was it? I don't mean to try to define it. Someone just had a bad run is all, and this one time, there were harsh consequences.

 

The films Tog mentioned are on topic.


Edited by davluri - 11/7/11 at 5:41pm
post #55 of 62


"Claim" could be another one

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

No apologies needed here.

(hey, no one mentioned the headgear issue...I didn't use that other word, cause the spambots will find it and hijack the thread)

 

There's definitely something to the movie thing, though a look at the deaths belies that fact. I don't know the numbers, but it seems as if very few were actually filming when they died.

What do you say about climbing mountains?  It's similar, and people die.  Probably more even.

 

I'd recommend the films "Steep", and "Edge of Never"  here. It gives a little perspective beyond just filming. I'm sure someone else will recommend something else.

 

To minimize "unnecessary" losses, you just have to not go out there. Once you go into the mountains in that type of terrain, it's dangerous.  Most of those people were definitely unwilling to stay home and stay safe. They needed to go out there. It's just the way it is. Humans have always been that way. Hey, maybe it's selfish, but that's a judgement based on being safe is always right.



 

post #56 of 62


Quote:

Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I really wasn't able to say what I meant (and will likely fail again).

 

Judgement was fine all around. that wasn't it. It was execution. It appeared in the photo that we are seeing the turn that starts the run with the dogleg. In the moment we see, the skier's position seems not to be establishing total control. If it's just an awkward split second, well my error, and no disrespect is meant. I hope it has now been long enough to say that. My mind says: something went wrong. what was it? I don't mean to try to define it. Someone just had a bad run is all, and this one time, there were harsh consequences.

 


I believe you're right in that photo is the start of the dogleg.  Definitely something went wrong, because he fell somewhere soon after - but I think it's around the corner because Matt couldn't see it. I guess Chad also tumbled because his ski stuck in the snow vertically right at the edge. Who knows, maybe he caught a rock and fell.

It was just an unforgiving place for that type of fall, whatever it was he could not arrest it soon enough.

These are mountain deaths as opposed to some sort of stunt or performance related death that was the focus of the op. Oddly, it seems that most of the deaths have been more in that category. McConkey being the obvious exception. (Even if his is categorized as a base jump, he took off with skis on.)

 

There's no disrespect in acknowledging a mistake. Emily Coombs essentially said Doug dropped his guard for a moment because of the situation. That doesn't take away a lifetime of achievement, and a lifetime of achievement doesn't prevent the consequences of the moment.

 

Then there's this type of risk taking. Surely, this could be classified as "unnecessary". eek.gif

 

PPcover.jpg

 

Interview with Philippe Petit:

Quote:

Death frames the high wire. But I don't see myself as taking risks. I do all of the preparations that a non-death seeker would do. The WTC walk was crazy though; I was lucky. It was terrifying. Still, I grabbed the balancing pole not with the feeling of a man who is about to die.

 

Psychology Today

"Fluke Skywalker: Philippe Petit:

 

I heard an interview with him on npr in Sept. of this year.  I was blown away by the guy. I had no idea. His views relate to this whole subject.

They've just made a movie about Petit and the tower walk, "Man on Wire".

 

"Why did you do this?"

"Why? There is no why."

 

...."I did something magnificent and mysterious, and I got a 'Why?'...It seems to me very American question... And the beauty of this, is that I didn't have any why."

- from "Man on Wire"

see here for clip from movie and interview sept. '11 : http://www.studio360.org/2011/sep/02/philippe-petit-man-on-wire/

 

It really was a magnificent achievement, performance, creation and lives on even though the Towers are gone.

 

 

post #57 of 62

Here's a gorgeous film that addresses this in a way, like Edge of Never.

It's been posted on Epic before.

"Ten: A Cameraman's Tale"

by guido perrini

www.guidoperrini.com

 

 

 

post #58 of 62

Tog thanks for posting that.  Its been a while.

 

post #59 of 62

Being fairly new to skiing, i totally agree with this. I get nothing out of death defying hucks. I know ill never do that, nor have the desire to do so. 

I come from a kayaking background, nothing Gnar, but ive been around it more than skiing.  Some guys feel a need to paddle dangerous rivers, and I just do not get the risk vs reward. There are "safer" rivers that are just as much fun, without as much consequence. The guys that do this that have families, i really dont get. 

 

I see it like being addicted to a narcotic. It always takes a little more to get that feeling youre chasing. It's called adrenalin "junkie" for a reason.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hirustler View Post

Maybe I'm old fashioned but I'd way rather see a long sequence of great turns on epic terrain in deep powder.  Those sick jumps do nothing for me.  And that's probably how most of the deaths occur: hucking ridiculous cliffs.

 

Maybe I'm a minority.  But why do they assume I want to see massive air all day?  It's boring.  I'd rather see a better version of what I can already do.



 

post #60 of 62

I truly want to know, from professional psychologists in our community, what is the escalation of risk and pain, and even death, about. and from doctors out there, what is the release of endorphins caused by and how does that progress? medically speaking, what is the emotional, hormonal, and physiological reward of risk taking?

 

Since my death experience, my nervous system is a bit raw and hyper-sensitive. I can't watch pumped up violence because I'm already pumping everything I experience up 10X and it becomes unbearable. Watching what they are filming now is literally painful to me. Are there souls so numb that this level of risk, watched or participated in, is the only thing that wakes them up? I think so.

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