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~ 110 Underfoot: Blog, Bacon, Sidestash, S7, Cochise?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Long time lurker, first time poster and I dread being "that guy", but here I go anyhow...

 

Stats:

- Male

- Age:  42

- 5'11" 200 pounds

- Ability: about a 5 out of 6 (depending on terrain)

- Time on the hill:  Took all of my 20s and half my 30s off from skiing... now I get about 25 days a year in

- Daily drivers:  Fischer Watea 84s 177cm (Love them!)

- Boot:  Lange RX130s (last years... Love them!)

- Location:  Seattle, WA (ski primarily NW, including Whistler, with at least one trip per year out of state to ID, CO, UT, etc.).

 

Desire:

A 2nd pair for fresh snow days that I can go off on my own (off-piste) in the morning but then be able to still have fun (carve) on the groomers with the wife in the afternoon.  The groomers will be fairly cruddy on these, I would assume.

 

I have no desire to get rid of my Watea's... my assumption is that I should be looking for something in that 105 to 110 underfoot range.  I've been around to the shops and have started to triangulate what I'll want to demo, when the snow arrives.  The purpose of this post is to maybe get that demo list a little shorter, if I won't be able to do a demo day but will have to demo through the shop.  If that's the case, then I may only get to demo about 3 pair, maybe 4.

 

Here's my list:

- Atomic Blog:  3 out of 4 guys in a row (from 3 different shops) started with the Blog

- Line SF Bacon:  the only shop that carried them, started here then went to the Blog

- K2 Sidestash:  eveyone suggests them about 2 or 3 down the list.

- Rossignal S7:  not pushed that hard, which surprises me

- Blizzard Cochise:  one guy recommended, then another guy thought it's going to be too stiff for my tastes (based on my love affair with the Wateas).

- Line Influence 105

 

Anything else?

 

Please be gentle.

post #2 of 23

Take the Blog off your list it's a massive dissapointment for a man your size. I have experienced it's mediocrity in relation to men of our stature.

 

Include the following ski's for your consideration:

 

http://www.on3pskis.com/products/skis/jeffrey/

 

http://www.on3pskis.com/products/skis/vicik/

 

Here is my Vicik review: http://www.epicski.com/t/98258/review-2011-186-on3p-vicik

 

Since you are looking at S7 you should also look at the Billygoat:

 

http://www.on3pskis.com/products/skis/billy-goat/

 

As well as read Blister's review of the BG in relation to the S7: http://blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/2010-2011-on3p-billy-goat-186cm

 

FYI the Vicik, and the BG are available at Evo currently. And I know that ON3P will be doing some demo days in Washington.

post #3 of 23

I have only skied the S7 and Bacon, and i can tell you that they are both great skis. The bacons are better on groomers in my opinion, but the s7 is better when theres fresh. I personally think the Bacon is the best all around ski i have skied. Great all mountain ski.

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys!

 

 

post #5 of 23

I have skied all the skis you mentioned and owned an S7. From your list, I'd suggest the Line 105 but probably your best bet would be the Atomic Coax. The Coax has a lighter and more nimble feel that is more akin to your Wateas. It also has tip rise only like the Line and a more conventional shape and camber profile and thus will feel more or less normal when skiing with the wife. Naturally, it will not have the same feel in deeper snow as the more heavily rockered and or tapered skis. The Coax will be more versatile outside of the powder while the Bacon/S7 will be more versatile while you are in it. That distinction/preference will ultimately be your call.

 

SJ 

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by flagship11 View Post

Long time lurker, first time poster and I dread being "that guy", but here I go anyhow...

 

 

...Anything else?...

 


What shops have you been to? This list has me more than a bit surprised.

 

 

post #7 of 23

no love 4 the DPS 112? I would certainly put that ahead of a 7. plus it is actaully a lot of fun on soft groomers.

post #8 of 23

You might also consider the Praxis BC's. Gets good reviews for what you're looking for. I bought a pair that will be mounted with Plum's for the Tahoe back country.

post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

I've been to Alpine Ski, Seattle Ski and Sturtevants (twice)...

 

Thanks for the additional thoughts guys; and for being gentle!

post #10 of 23

You might want to consider Icelantic Shamans, 160-110-130, traditional camber, twin tip.  They're great in powder and they will really rip on groomers.  I like mine so much I hardly skied anything else last season.

post #11 of 23

how would you describe the way the 50mm sidecut in the forebody skis in powder and chop and crud?  what is their design for the tail being 30 less than the tip about, based on skiing them?

post #12 of 23

We never had any bottomless powder at Red Lodge last season so I only know how they handled in about 15-16" which was the most we ever got in one dump.  They were very easy to steer and, at least in that much powder floated quite nicely.  I spent some time more than once going back and forth between groomed and crud, in some cases the crud was fairly solid as it was late in the season and the skis did well, they just blasted on through without throwing me around.  I also skied a lot of bumps on them and while they certainly aren't the best bump skis and I am far from being a bump expert, the skis handled well.  I don't know their exact reasoning behind the 30mm difference tip to tail but one thing is fairly obvious and that is that if they were closer to symmetrical, the turning radius would be so small they would be pretty much uncontrollable.  The other reason is that combined with the twin tip, the tails release easily coming out of a turn which certainly helps in the bumps.  They can be pretty clunky if you don't ski very fast.  But, with even a decent amount of speed they are quite maneuverable and I never had reason to complain about how long it takes to get from one edge to the other.  I used them for teaching almost all the time and even used them for most of a 2-day PSIA level 2 prep clinic. 

post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by flagship11 View Post

I've been to Alpine Ski, Seattle Ski and Sturtevants (twice)...

 

Thanks for the additional thoughts guys; and for being gentle!



Not that I'd argue with TAJ about the BCs...awesome skis & on sale for another day or two (w/ coupon code knocking another 10% off...).

 

That said, you owe it to yourself to swing by and check out the wall at evo in Freemont. Good luck finding a better thought out wall of modern skis or a more consistently informed staff.

 

IMO Sturtevants has upped their game this year - but there is still a lot of variation in the point of view you'll get there. Pick a random staff member on the sales floor and they could personally use anything from an old school "all mountain" to an ON3P Billy Goat as their day to day ski.

 

If you do trek over to the east side again, you could do worse than to visit Gerk's in Redmond. 

post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 

Thanks.... I was already planning on heading to Evo this weekend and Gerks is on the list the next time I'm venturing east again too.

 

Thanks again for the thought out advice to all..... now if we could just get some snow so I could start demoing!

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post



Not that I'd argue with TAJ about the BCs...awesome skis & on sale for another day or two (w/ coupon code knocking another 10% off...).

 

That said, you owe it to yourself to swing by and check out the wall at evo in Freemont. Good luck finding a better thought out wall of modern skis or a more consistently informed staff.

 

IMO Sturtevants has upped their game this year - but there is still a lot of variation in the point of view you'll get there. Pick a random staff member on the sales floor and they could personally use anything from an old school "all mountain" to an ON3P Billy Goat as their day to day ski.

 

If you do trek over to the east side again, you could do worse than to visit Gerk's in Redmond. 



Good call on Evo!

Talked to two different guys.... they know their stuff!

post #16 of 23

 

Quote:

Ability: about a 5 out of 6 (depending on terrain)

So, you ski almost like the ski movie guys, but don't like straightlining when it gets steeper than 45 and don't drop anything higher than  40'? Well, that's impressive for someone who skis only 25 days a year....

post #17 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by apeyros View Post

 

So, you ski almost like the ski movie guys, but don't like straightlining when it gets steeper than 45 and don't drop anything higher than  40'? Well, that's impressive for someone who skis only 25 days a year....



Not even close.

The 5 out of 6 assessment is actually based on the Whistler/Blackcomb ski school ability level which is an accurate assessment (not self assessment) of my ability. 

http://www.whistlerblackcomb.com/snowschool/ability_charts.htm

 

"Able to ski strong parallel turns with a pole plant on all blue runs and easy black runs. Learning, short turns, off piste, moguls, powder and more difficult terrain."

 

 

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by poNTOonMcConks View Post

I have only skied the S7 and Bacon, and i can tell you that they are both great skis. The bacons are better on groomers in my opinion, but the s7 is better when theres fresh. I personally think the Bacon is the best all around ski i have skied. Great all mountain ski.



This is where I found the DPS Wailer 112rp to be a great balance.  It excelled in powder, but still handled the chop and groomers very well.  Not that I'd pick it if we had a snow drought, but it is very well balanced.

 

 

post #19 of 23



I'd have to agree, the DPS is even better than some pow specific skis i've been on recently, but it handles groomers like a champ! A little on the expensive side though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post



This is where I found the DPS Wailer 112rp to be a great balance.  It excelled in powder, but still handled the chop and groomers very well.  Not that I'd pick it if we had a snow drought, but it is very well balanced.

 

 



 

post #20 of 23

The DPS, though versatile, is certainly a powder specific ski isn't it, at 112mm?  We could be running out of useful terminology soon.

post #21 of 23



I guess it should be called pow- specific, but with skis like say, the Hellbent at 130mm or the pon2oon and skis along those lines, 112 to me doesn't seem like a big enough ski to be calling pow- specific anymore. Although there is that huge rocker...

Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

The DPS, though versatile, is certainly a powder specific ski isn't it, at 112mm?  We could be running out of useful terminology soon.



 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

The DPS, though versatile, is certainly a powder specific ski isn't it, at 112mm?  We could be running out of useful terminology soon.



While someone like me would consider it a Pow specific ski, there are many who are wow'd by its all mountain capabilities.  In fact, DPS' own description is.....

 

The Wailer 112RP is a true game changer. It is the most versatile ski ever built. It combines the loose and early planing feel of a fully rockered ski with aggressive sidecut and slight camber underfoot. It’s a one ski quiver for planing powder in the morning, laying trenches down to the lift on the groomers, and slaying crud in the afternoon. A 15m radius underfoot and great torsional stiffness allow for maximum versatility, while the rockered and tapered tips and tail allow the Wailer 112RP to get loose and be driven from the ball of the foot in deeper snow.

post #23 of 23


This is what I was saying about terminology, a total loss of specific meaning. Is powder specific really good in powder or completely unsuitable to anything else?

Quote:
Originally Posted by poNTOonMcConks View Post



I guess it should be called pow- specific, but with skis like say, the Hellbent at 130mm or the pon2oon and skis along those lines, 112 to me doesn't seem like a big enough ski to be calling pow- specific anymore. Although there is that huge rocker...



 



 



Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post



While someone like me would consider it a Pow specific ski, there are many who are wow'd by its all mountain capabilities.  In fact, DPS' own description is.....

 

The Wailer 112RP is a true game changer. It is the most versatile ski ever built. It combines the loose and early planing feel of a fully rockered ski with aggressive sidecut and slight camber underfoot. It’s a one ski quiver for planing powder in the morning, laying trenches down to the lift on the groomers, and slaying crud in the afternoon. A 15m radius underfoot and great torsional stiffness allow for maximum versatility, while the rockered and tapered tips and tail allow the Wailer 112RP to get loose and be driven from the ball of the foot in deeper snow.



 

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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › ~ 110 Underfoot: Blog, Bacon, Sidestash, S7, Cochise?