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tele skis

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Was looking at new skis for NTN tele setup.  Dynastar Legend 85's and 94's what are thoughts?  I ski the Legend 85's on alpine and love them.  Thought of going a little wider with 94 or staying with the 85's.  Can you go too wide with tele?  I'm a new telemark skier and have been alpine skier for many years.

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post #2 of 9

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIINGISGOOD View Post

Was looking at new skis for NTN tele setup.  Dynastar Legend 85's and 94's what are thoughts?  I ski the Legend 85's on alpine and love them.  

 

Then I bet you'll love them for tele.

 

Quote:
Thought of going a little wider with 94 or staying with the 85's.  Can you go too wide with tele?  I'm a new telemark skier and have been alpine skier for many years.

 

One of the great things about NTN is how well they drive wide skis.  Your boots will be the limiting factor, not the bindings.  I'd say go for the wide ones.  

 

post #3 of 9

I have been alpine and tele skiing for many years, mostly on area, and have teled on many kinds of skis, including lots of alpine skis. I decided to cull my tele quivere and reduced it to one pair, Fischer Watea 94s.  I have been very happy with this decision.  The only deficiency is in real deep powder. They work, but it would be nice to have a wider ski.  Keep in mind that I am 215 lbs. and tend to overpower a Watea 94 when using it for alpine skiing

 

IMO your favorite alpine ski is probably too stiff to be your favorite tele ski.  It is an obvious generalization, but when carving on alpine all your weight is on one ski at a time, but when carving on teles it is only about half your weight since you are using both skis for every turn.  I realize that often tele skiers are carving mostly on the front ski (particularly alpine crossover skiers), but when you are doing it right you are using much less weight to flex your skis, so a softer ski works better.

 

I have always felt that the best way to learn to tele "correctly", that is staying balanced between your skis instead of on one or the other, is to ski bumps.  A mellower flexing ski makes tele bump skiing much less of a struggle, and you can still rail hardback without a super stiff ski because you are using a lighter touch during the  turn.

 

If you are serious about tele skiing, you really need an daily driver and a fat powder ski, but that's another thread.  Like any kind of ski choice, flex is the key, and a tele skier is using less of their weight to flex the ski in most turn situations.

post #4 of 9

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post

I have been alpine and tele skiing for many years, mostly on area, and have teled on many kinds of skis, including lots of alpine skis. I decided to cull my tele quivere and reduced it to one pair, Fischer Watea 94s.  I have been very happy with this decision.  The only deficiency is in real deep powder. They work, but it would be nice to have a wider ski.  Keep in mind that I am 215 lbs. and tend to overpower a Watea 94 when using it for alpine skiing

 

IMO your favorite alpine ski is probably too stiff to be your favorite tele ski.  It is an obvious generalization, but when carving on alpine all your weight is on one ski at a time, but when carving on teles it is only about half your weight since you are using both skis for every turn.  I realize that often tele skiers are carving mostly on the front ski (particularly alpine crossover skiers), but when you are doing it right you are using much less weight to flex your skis, so a softer ski works better.

 

I have always felt that the best way to learn to tele "correctly", that is staying balanced between your skis instead of on one or the other, is to ski bumps.  A mellower flexing ski makes tele bump skiing much less of a struggle, and you can still rail hardback without a super stiff ski because you are using a lighter touch during the  turn.

 

If you are serious about tele skiing, you really need an daily driver and a fat powder ski, but that's another thread.  Like any kind of ski choice, flex is the key, and a tele skier is using less of their weight to flex the ski in most turn situations.


Well, let me throw out a couple of thoughts.  Things are changing in the tele world.  You're absolutely right about splitting the weight close to 50/50 for tele, but most everyone that is a good alpine skier with modern alpine skiing technique is well on the road to splitting their weight towards 50/50 on carved alpine turns.  In fact, I see a lot of discussion here on weighting the inside ski on parallel turns.  The OP claimed many years of alpine skiing, so I assumed...

 

In my recent years as a shop rat I found that just about all the people that were good alpine skiers liked tele skis that were similar to their alpine skis, because they quickly brought the same forces to bear on their tele stuff as their alpine.  They ended up feeling limited by softer skis.  Of course, people that liked soft alpine skis also liked soft tele skis.  

 

The other thing is NTN.  I don't know if you've skied NTN but it has a real gift for applying power to both skis but especially the rear ski.  NTN really helps to bring the power people like in alpine skiing to tele skiing.  

 

So, that's why I said what I said in my first post.  FWIW, I was strictly tele from '77 until a few years ago, and I still tele over 70 days a year.  

 

post #5 of 9

Bob:

 

I don't mean soft skis, just a little softer than your regular alpine skis.  Over the years I have had several pairs of skis that I skied alpine and then mounted for tele.  My experience was that skis I really liked for carving on hardpack or skiing bumps were not that great for the same functions when skiing tele.  I agree that NTN bindings and the newer heavy duty tele boots allow you to effectively drive almost any ski on the market, but my experience has been that my favorite alpine skis were not my favorite tele skis. A good ski is a good ski, so the tele/alpine distinction does not mean much (except for the binding mount point), but because of the technique difference and weight split I think a bit mellower flex works better for tele, at least it did for me.  MF

post #6 of 9

I'l second the softer ski for tele.  I really like dynastar 8800's and 8000's for alpine but set up  a pair of 4800's for tele and they work great.

 

royal

post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 

Also was looking at Nordica Steadfast ski.  It is an in between width of 90 under foot.  Any thoughts?  

post #8 of 9

I'll go with Bob on this one. If one is a technically sound and strong alpine skier, you'll pretty much like your favorite ski. The exception will be if you plan on doing a lot of skinning. If so, then there's a point where you'll have to consider ski/boot/binding weight in the equation as horizontal, vertical, and the 'down' component have to be balanced more than with lift access or limited side country 'touring'.

 

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

thnks for all great advice

 

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