EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How to fall intentionally if needed?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to fall intentionally if needed? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

I get the feeling that the posters on this thread are picking on the poor OP just like the children at his hill are victimizing him by not getting out of his way quickly enough. Here is some helpful advice.

 

  1. Grow up. People here are giving your question the answer it deserves. Don't like the answer? Ask a better question.
  2. Respect gets respect. People on the slope are not obstacles to be overcome. They have a right to be there and deserve your respect. 
  3. People (especially beginners (and especially kids)) are unpredictable. Ski smart and give other skiers a wide berth relative to the speed you are going -- the faster you go, the wider the safety margin. 
  4. Learn to ski. You think you are a good skier. But if you can't turn when you want to and stop when you need to then you are not.
post #32 of 43

So how much further is it to a decent sized hill?

post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post



 

I understand what you are saying, but what pisses me the most is by posting a question I'm automatically assumed to be some fast maniac who can't ski, which in reality I'm anything but (the maniac part at least), and instead of answer the question people who knows nothing about me or the condition I ski in feel the need to give me a preaching lesson.


Not preaching, 'just saying' as they say. We all speak from our own perspectives. After skiing four plus decades now, I can honestly say that I've never had to fall to avoid someone. As such, your original question was just nothing I'd ever considered as a strategy, especially knowing how little control one has once they're down and sliding, and particularly so in hard snow conditions. In summary and without personal judgement, I think everyone's telling you that falling to avoid someone is a bad idea.

 


Edited by markojp - 10/27/11 at 12:19pm
post #34 of 43

One thing to add that others have hinted at but not mentioned directly: think about where your eyes are focused when you're skiing, because it sounds like you're staring at the ground.

 

I know I often didn't look as far in front of me as I should have. Instead, I was staring at the ground right in front of me, trying to read the terrain as if I was going to notice some bump, ice, etc., at the last second and have to adjust. That kept me from reading the situation in front of me on crowded slopes.

 

That habit was broken when I started teaching a friend of mine at the indoor slopes around these parts (near London). It's the worst chaos you've ever seen on a ski slope, and it taught me to always look well out in front at the people around me (even when riding the drag lift back up), because you never know when one will lose control and shoot across the hill. Every time we go, I spend most of the two hours dodging the people who are crashing and burning.

 

If you look far enough in front, you should always be able to avoid situations where you're too close to someone to avoid contact. And, if there's too big of a crowd to make your way through, then just stand still for a bit and wait for them to all fall down. It'll happen eventually.

 

As Ghost mentioned, intentional falls are only for when you've lost balance and can't regain control safely.

post #35 of 43

Another option for you on crowded slopes is to try something new that you don't yet know how to do, instead of doing your wide fast turns.  

 

How about working on 360s (whirlybirds)?  Or very, very short rounded turns heading straight down the fall line?   Both these are good things to get good a.  The first is just admirable, and the second one will serve you well in the bumps.  You can entertain yourself learning to do these things without picking up any serious speed as you travel down through the throngs of slow skiers.

 

 

post #36 of 43

I mean seriously, am I the only guy who thinks this thread is a total 100% laugh out loud put on. consider the writing style and the knowledge of skiing that sneaks into the perspective the pushing of popular epic buttons,. nah, I'm not going for it at all. I'd guess it's one of our multi-screen-name members having a little fun.

post #37 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post

Another option for you on crowded slopes is to try something new that you don't yet know how to do, instead of doing your wide fast turns.  

 

How about working on 360s (whirlybirds)?  Or very, very short rounded turns heading straight down the fall line?   Both these are good things to get good a.  The first is just admirable, and the second one will serve you well in the bumps.  You can entertain yourself learning to do these things without picking up any serious speed as you travel down through the throngs of slow skiers.

 

 



Or you could do like I did and take up Telemark skiing.  You'll get really good at falling and you won't have to worry about hitting the little kids on the slopes, 'cause they'll all be standing still, laughing and pointing, until you make your way past.

 

post #38 of 43

It sounds like your ski area sucks.

post #39 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by davluri View Post

I mean seriously, am I the only guy who thinks this thread is a total 100% laugh out loud put on. consider the writing style and the knowledge of skiing that sneaks into the perspective the pushing of popular epic buttons,. nah, I'm not going for it at all. I'd guess it's one of our multi-screen-name members having a little fun.



I was coming to believe this.  The belligerent insistence seems incredible.  But we have seen it before from some people we know are real...

post #40 of 43

If a blue slope full of umpaloompas is driving you nuts, go to the black runs.

post #41 of 43
So you are in your carve, and a kid wanders onto your projected line around the turn. You want to bail and get flung straight out from the turn, instead of following the line and plowing the kid?

You aren't as locked into your turn as you feel. If you just stand up a little and point your tips in the same direction you would go off on if you bailed, you'll get the same result and stay on your skis.

If you think you just had to bail, let up off your edges and roll into a hockey stop, then lay on over and pick your skis up. But remember you are then traveling with no control while leading with sharp edges. You would have been better just staying with the hockey stop, IMO. You'd still be going in the same direction the centripetal force will be sending you, and you will be in control.

You could also practice taking steps in your turn, and learn to walk yourself into a higher or lower line.

I see your problem, I just don't think a bail is the answer to it.

I'm not an instructor, and I'm just guessing at it. Take my advice on this at your own risk.
post #42 of 43

While the OP did expose himself as lacking in knowledge/awareness, he did it in good faith, looking for assistance i.e. they don't want to continue in that state.  Then it got messy: responders over react, OP has thin skin ...... etc.  Filtering out the emotion, this is a very good give and take of information and advice.  The only thing I would like to add is that deciding to fall down from a normal skiing stance is never the best choice, especially on firmer snow (but it's amazing how many people do it); in fact I can't think of any situation where it is anything but a last, incredibly desperate and ill-advised option - it never seems to end up well.  The last time I chose to fall (on nice soft, fresh snow), I ended up in the ER and lost 8" of intestines.  The "art" of falling really only comes in to play when when you suddenly realize you've messed up and it's already started i.e. it's happening anyway, better keep the damage to a minimum.

post #43 of 43

I dont think the OP is lookin atthis anymore but just in case... I have a similar experience in the local mts around Los Angeles. Very crowded, lots of little ones cruisin horizontally. My thought process is to ski behind them. They would have a very difficult time making a sudden change in direction with a snow plow. This may mean I have to make some longer turns mixed in with shorter turns and not directly down the fall line, but can still be fun.

agreen 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › How to fall intentionally if needed?